Essential Oils for Cut Flowers

Who doesn’t love having decorative spring flowers to brighten their home? The only downside to bringing cut flowers inside is that they don’t seem to last very long. We have been experimenting with cut flowers, and we found that adding a drop of melaleuca to the water helps them last longer!

Useful tips when caring for cut flowers:

  • Cut the stems of the flowers at an angle. This allows the flower to soak up nutrients more easily.
  • Add a drop of melaleuca essential oil to a flower water mix (see recipe below). The melaleuca helps kill bacteria that leads to mold growth.
  • Use filtered water to reduce the amount of chlorine and other minerals or chemicals often found in tap water. These substances diminish plant health.
  • Change flower water and recut flower stems (just a tiny bit) every 2–3 days. A cut flower stem eventually seals up, preventing nutrient assimilation. So cutting the stems and adding more nutrients helps preserve the flowers.
  • Keep cut flowers away from direct heat and light (if possible).

Decorative Flower Vases

  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Stir together sugar and melaleuca in a glass measuring cup.
  2. Add apple cider vinegar and filtered water. Mix well until sugar is dissolved.
  3. Add the water mixture to bottles or clear plastic tubes.
  4. Cut flower stems at an angle a little longer than the desired length. Arrange flowers in the bottles or tubes.
  5. Change flower water and cut stems just a little bit every 2–3 days.

Extra Ideas:

  • Clear plastic tubes make great single flower vases. You can easily decorate them by gluing ribbon, buttons, or other items to the outside.
  • If you are using cut flowers for an event—essential oil class, wedding reception, or party—you may want to use a floral essential oil instead of melaleuca to enhance the scent of your decoration. Then, when you are ready to display your flowers elsewhere (after 2+ days), add melaleuca essential oil to the replacement water. Some floral oils include lavender, ylang ylang, geranium, clary sage, Roman chamomile, jasmine, and rose.

Flower arrangements in glass bottles or clear plastic tubes make great centerpieces and decorations for essential oil classes!

Essential Oil Spotlight: Orange

Orange essential oil (Citrus sinensis) is cold expressed from the rinds of the fruit. It is very easy to extract—if you have ever peeled an orange, you have likely ended up with essential oil on your hands. The oil is deep golden yellow with a characteristic orange peel aroma.

Orange essential oil is used primarily for anxiety, digestion (sluggish), fear, heart palpitations, insomnia, menopause, nervousness, uplifting, and withdrawals.

Oranges have historically been used for palpitations, scurvy, jaundice, bleeding, heartburn, relaxed throat, prolapse of the uterus and the anus, diarrhea, and blood in the feces. This essential oil may also help appetite, rickety bones, bronchitis, colds, colic (dilute for infants; helps them sleep), dermatitis, digestive system, fever, flu, lower high cholesterol, mouth ulcers, muscle soreness, obesity, sedation, tissue repair, water retention, and wrinkles.

Some of the properties of orange essential oil include anticancer, antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, digestive, sedative, and tonic.

Applications of Orange Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Orange essential oil can be applied neat (with no dilution) when used topically. Apply directly on area of concern or to reflex points. Avoid direct sunlight for up to 12 hours after using on skin.
Aromatic Application: Orange essential oil can be diffused or inhaled directly. Orange oil is calming and uplifting to the mind and body when inhaled.
Internal Application: Orange essential oil can be taken internally and is often used as a flavoring in cooking. Put 1–2 drops of orange oil under the tongue or in a beverage. It can also be taken in capsules.

5 Ways to Use Orange Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Orange essential oil is effective to help influence emotions. It is often used for balancing emotions, confidence, happiness/joy, loss, counteracting negative emotions, feeling overburdened/overwhelmed, pity (especially self-pity), and uplifting the mind. Try diffusing orange essential oil alone or in one of the following recipes:

Here are a few other diffuser blends that use orange essential oil:

2. Add to a Massage Oil or Bath
Try adding one of the following blends to 1 1/2 Tbsp. massage oil, such as fractionated coconut oil, coconut oil, jojoba oil, or sweet almond oil. You can also use these blends in a diffuser or a bath (combine with 1/4 cup epsom salt to evenly disperse throughout the tub).

Uplifting Massage
5 drops juniper berry
3 drops orange
3 drops lime
Invigorating Massage
3 drops cypress
2 drops bergamot
2 drops orange
Relaxing Massage for Men
5 drops sandalwood
4 drops orange
2 drops vetiver

3. Combine in a Roll-on Blend
Orange essential oil is known for helping heart issues, stimulating sluggish digestion, relieving insomnia, and turning frowns into smiles. If you need help with any of these conditions, try making a blend and rolling it on the area of concern or on the bottoms of your feet. Just add the recommended number of drops to a 10 ml roll-on bottle, and then fill the rest of the bottle with a carrier oil, such as fractionated coconut oil, jojoba oil, or sweet almond oil. These recipes are formulated at a 5% dilution ratio.

Circulation Roll-on
7 drops orange
3 drops ylang ylang
2 drops lavender
Digestive Roll-on
(eases constipation)

7 drops orange
3 drops black pepper
2 drops peppermint
Insomnia Roll-on
6 drops orange
6 drops lavender
Happy Roll-on
4 drops orange
4 drops lavender
4 drops ylang ylang

4.  Put in a Natural Mouthwash
Try putting orange essential oil in a coconut oil mouthwash. Just add 1 drop each orange and lemon essential oil to 1 tsp. coconut oil. Swish the solution around in your mouth, and then swallow or spit into the garbage. (Don’t spit into the sink because coconut oil can solidify in the pipes.)

5. Use in Cooking Recipes
Orange essential oil is easy to add to any of your favorite recipes. Just substitute 1 drop of orange oil for 1 tsp. of orange zest. Here are a few of our favorite recipes to help you get started:

Other Ideas Using Orange Essential Oil

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, p. 94.
Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol Schiller & David Schiller

Hasselback Herb Potatoes with Essential Oils

Have you tried hasselback potatoes yet? They are a lot like baked potatoes, but rather than piercing the potatoes with a fork, you cut slices in them with a knife, then fill the slices with yummy ingredients either before or after baking them. When making hasselback potatoes with essential oils, it’s best to add the oils after baking the potatoes so you don’t lose the health benefits of the oils.

Start by slicing the potatoes, drizzling them with olive oil, and sprinkling salt and pepper on top before baking them. While they bake, mix up the herb butter by melting butter and stirring in the essential oils. If you happen to taste the herb butter, you may find the essential oils to be a bit strong. Just trust us, though—the final product tastes delicious!

When the potatoes are soft on the inside and crispy on the outside, pull them out of the oven. Then, while they are still hot, drizzle on the herb butter. Make sure to get it in between the slices.
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Simply Luxurious Moisturizing Lotion

So many of us use lotion every day, but many of the commercially available lotions contain ingredients that could actually be harmful to our bodies when used daily. Skin is very porous and absorbs just about everything put on it, so it’s best to use lotion made of natural ingredients. And the best way to know what is in your lotion is to make it yourself!

This lotion recipe is really simple to make. First, melt your hard oils (cocoa butter, beeswax, and coconut oil). Then add your soft or liquid oils (sweet almond oil, fractionated coconut oil, and jojoba oil). Finally, blend together the water and oils until the mixture emulsifies. You’ll hear and feel a change, but keep blending to prevent the water and oil from separating later. Watch the video at the end of this post to see how simple this lotion is to make!

The best part about making your own lotion is that you get to customize the scent! Essential oils make that really easy. You can simply add your favorite essential oil or blend, or you can add oils that help with specific health issues. Whatever you choose to create, this lotion makes a great base because it is simple to make, absorbs easily, moisturizes well, and feels so luxurious!

Moisturizing Lotion

  • Servings: Yield=8 oz. (240 ml)
  • Difficulty: Moderate
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Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. In a double boiler, melt cocoa butter and beeswax pellets over low heat. Once melted, add the coconut oil, and continue heating until almost melted. Remove from heat, and stir until everything finishes melting.
  2. Stir in the sweet almond oil, fractionated coconut oil, and jojoba oil.
  3. Heat distilled water until warm.
  4. Using a hand mixer, start beating water, and slowly add the oil mixture while continuing to beat. Keep beating for a few minutes. As you blend, you will hear a change and feel the lotion thicken. Let stand for a few minutes. If lotion separates during this time, continue to blend it again for a couple more minutes. If it doesn’t separate, then it has emulsified properly.
  5. Mix in the essential oil.
  6. Pour lotion into a plastic zip-top bag. Snip off a corner of the bag, and squeeze the lotion into your container of choice.
  7. To use, pump a little into your hand, and massage into the skin as needed.

Here are some lotion containers we recommend:

Acrylic Lotion Pump Bottles: These will turn your lotion into a fancy personalized gift.
8 oz. Bottle with Pump Top: These are the perfect size for making a batch to use at home.
Small Lotion Tottles: These are small and portable—perfect for your purse or bag. You can even add a carabiner to clip it to the outside of your bag.
For an extra touch, try adding this cute vinyl “Moisturizer” label!

If you’re a visual learner, watch this video to see just how simple this lotion is to make.

“Introduction to Modern Essentials™”: A Mini Textbook for Essential Oil Classes

This year, we introduce our newest edition of the “Introduction to Modern Essentials” booklet. We’ve updated this booklet to include a lot of fantastic information and recipes to make this booklet the best mini textbook for your essential oil classes!
A great way to approach these classes is to keep them focused on educating people about essential oils, but allow individuals to experience and use the oils as part of each class.

At the end of each class, invite those who would like to know more about your chosen brand of pure, therapeutic-grade oils to come talk to you after class or at a separate meeting. These meetings are great opportunities to share with others why you made the choice to naturally support the health of yourself and your family with essential oils.

Class Ideas

Essential Oils 101
Use the first few pages of this booklet to introduce individuals to essential oils and why they are being used by millions of people around the world as a natural way to
support health. This idea can be used on its own or combined with a make-and-take idea.

Scavenger Hunt
Doing this scavenger hunt activity can not only help bring some fun to your class and make it memorable, but it also gives your students a reason to look through the “Introduction to Modern Essentials” booklet. As they look through it and find the answers to the questions, they will learn so much about the essential oils and what the oils can do for specific conditions. They will also learn how they can use the booklet to find answers to their own questions. This activity can be used as a class idea on its own, or it can be added to another class idea as a bonus activity.

Aromatherapy Make & Take Class
Use the information on the diffusing pages to teach how the natural aromas of essential oils can affect the mind and emotions. Allow individuals to sample and make their favorite blend from the “Diffuser Blend Recipes” pages. Add their blend to water in a mini spray bottle for a take-home room and linen spray. An emulsifier (optional) will help distribute the essential oil evenly throughout the water.

Roll-On Balms
Use the information on the “Roll-On Blend Recipes” pages to teach about topical application of essential oils, and allow individuals to make their own natural roll-ons in mini roll-on bottles to take home with them. You can find roll-on bottles and carrier oils at aromatools.com.

Relaxing with Massage Oils
Use the information on the “Using Essential Oils—Applying on Location” and “Using Essential Oils—Massage” pages to teach about massage and topical application of essential oils. Allow individuals to use the “Massage Oil Recipes” to make their own natural massage oils in small bottles to take home with them. You can find small bottles (such as a 1/2 oz. or 1 oz. plastic bottle) and carrier oils at aromatools.com.

Essential Oil–Enhanced Baths
Use the information on the diffusing pages to teach how the natural aromas of essential oils can affect the mind and emotions. Allow individuals to sample and make their favorite blend of bath salts from the “Bath Salts Recipes” page. Have them place their scented bath salts in a jar to take home with them. You can find jars and epsom salt at aromatools.com.

icecream

Gourmet Ice Cream Chef Competition
Use the pages on cooking with essential oils to teach about how to use pure, therapeutic-grade essential oils in cooking. Give everyone 1 cup (240 ml) cream and 2 Tbsp. (25 g) sugar, or substitute your own favorite sweetener and sweeten to taste. Allow class members to create their own naturally flavored ice cream base using essential oils. Since only a small amount (a drop or less) of essential oil is needed, give each guest a small bottle to blend their essential oil “flavor profile” in, and then dispense a drop or less of the blend from the bottle (use a toothpick if less is needed).

Place the base in a quart-sized (1 L) zip-top bag, and seal the bag. Place that bag inside a gallon-sized (4 L) zip-top bag filled with ice and 1/2 cup (250 g) of rock salt. Shake until the cream has frozen (about 10–15 minutes). Use small spoons to allow everyone to taste the creations, and award prizes based on best tasting or most daring (black pepper ice cream, anyone?). You could also add another dimension by adding natural vanilla bean to the flavor mix!

Winter Wellness with Essential Oils
Using the Personal Usage Guide section, lead the members of the class through various ailments that often occur during the winter time (such as cold sores, common colds, congestion, coughs, earache, fever, etc.) Allow individuals to make a cough relief roll-on by using the blend recipe found under “Coughs” or an immune support roll-on by using the blend recipe found under “Colds.” Jojoba oil and roll-on bottles can be found at aromatools.com.

Hot-Chocolate-SocialHot Chocolate Social
Provide hot chocolate and various hot chocolate toppings, such as whipped cream, crushed candy canes, marshmallows, and chocolate chips. Also provide various essential oils to add to the hot chocolate. Peppermint, orange, cinnamon, cassia, and cardamom essential oil all make great additions to hot chocolate. Instruct guests to just dip a toothpick in the oil and then swish the toothpick around in their hot chocolate. Click here for a great hot chocolate recipe.

Once everyone has helped themselves to hot chocolate and is sitting comfortably, this is a great time to share information about essential oils. You could focus on the health benefits of the oils you offered as hot chocolate mix-ins, provide basic introductory information about essential oils, discuss essential oils for winter wellness, or talk about cooking with essential oils.

Enhance Emotional Well-Being with Essential Oils
Use the diffusing pages and the “Emotions and Essential Oils” pages to teach how the natural aromas of essential oils can affect the mind and emotions. Lead the members of the class through various mental and emotional conditions found in the Personal Usage Guide section such as anxiety, calming, concentration, depression, grief/sorrow, memory, mental fatigue, relaxing, shock, stress, and uplifting. Allow individuals to smell the various oils or oil blends for emotional well-being, and invite them to create their own nasal inhaler using 1–3 oils (for a total of 5–8 drops) to take home with them.

If you have a great class idea that others can do with this booklet, please share it with us!