“Introduction to Modern Essentials™”: A Mini Textbook for Essential Oil Classes

This year, we introduce our newest edition of the “Introduction to Modern Essentials” booklet. We’ve updated this booklet to include a lot of fantastic information and recipes to make this booklet the best mini textbook for your essential oil classes!
A great way to approach these classes is to keep them focused on educating people about essential oils, but allow individuals to experience and use the oils as part of each class.

At the end of each class, invite those who would like to know more about your chosen brand of pure, therapeutic-grade oils to come talk to you after class or at a separate meeting. These meetings are great opportunities to share with others why you made the choice to naturally support the health of yourself and your family with essential oils.

Class Ideas

Essential Oils 101
Use the first few pages of this booklet to introduce individuals to essential oils and why they are being used by millions of people around the world as a natural way to
support health. This idea can be used on its own or combined with a make-and-take idea.

Scavenger Hunt
Doing this scavenger hunt activity can not only help bring some fun to your class and make it memorable, but it also gives your students a reason to look through the “Introduction to Modern Essentials” booklet. As they look through it and find the answers to the questions, they will learn so much about the essential oils and what the oils can do for specific conditions. They will also learn how they can use the booklet to find answers to their own questions. This activity can be used as a class idea on its own, or it can be added to another class idea as a bonus activity.

Aromatherapy Make & Take Class
Use the information on the diffusing pages to teach how the natural aromas of essential oils can affect the mind and emotions. Allow individuals to sample and make their favorite blend from the “Diffuser Blend Recipes” pages. Add their blend to water in a mini spray bottle for a take-home room and linen spray. An emulsifier (optional) will help distribute the essential oil evenly throughout the water.

Roll-On Balms
Use the information on the “Roll-On Blend Recipes” pages to teach about topical application of essential oils, and allow individuals to make their own natural roll-ons in mini roll-on bottles to take home with them. You can find roll-on bottles and carrier oils at aromatools.com.

Relaxing with Massage Oils
Use the information on the “Using Essential Oils—Applying on Location” and “Using Essential Oils—Massage” pages to teach about massage and topical application of essential oils. Allow individuals to use the “Massage Oil Recipes” to make their own natural massage oils in small bottles to take home with them. You can find small bottles (such as a 1/2 oz. or 1 oz. plastic bottle) and carrier oils at aromatools.com.

Essential Oil–Enhanced Baths
Use the information on the diffusing pages to teach how the natural aromas of essential oils can affect the mind and emotions. Allow individuals to sample and make their favorite blend of bath salts from the “Bath Salts Recipes” page. Have them place their scented bath salts in a jar to take home with them. You can find jars and epsom salt at aromatools.com.

icecream

Gourmet Ice Cream Chef Competition
Use the pages on cooking with essential oils to teach about how to use pure, therapeutic-grade essential oils in cooking. Give everyone 1 cup (240 ml) cream and 2 Tbsp. (25 g) sugar, or substitute your own favorite sweetener and sweeten to taste. Allow class members to create their own naturally flavored ice cream base using essential oils. Since only a small amount (a drop or less) of essential oil is needed, give each guest a small bottle to blend their essential oil “flavor profile” in, and then dispense a drop or less of the blend from the bottle (use a toothpick if less is needed).

Place the base in a quart-sized (1 L) zip-top bag, and seal the bag. Place that bag inside a gallon-sized (4 L) zip-top bag filled with ice and 1/2 cup (250 g) of rock salt. Shake until the cream has frozen (about 10–15 minutes). Use small spoons to allow everyone to taste the creations, and award prizes based on best tasting or most daring (black pepper ice cream, anyone?). You could also add another dimension by adding natural vanilla bean to the flavor mix!

Winter Wellness with Essential Oils
Using the Personal Usage Guide section, lead the members of the class through various ailments that often occur during the winter time (such as cold sores, common colds, congestion, coughs, earache, fever, etc.) Allow individuals to make a cough relief roll-on by using the blend recipe found under “Coughs” or an immune support roll-on by using the blend recipe found under “Colds.” Jojoba oil and roll-on bottles can be found at aromatools.com.

Hot-Chocolate-SocialHot Chocolate Social
Provide hot chocolate and various hot chocolate toppings, such as whipped cream, crushed candy canes, marshmallows, and chocolate chips. Also provide various essential oils to add to the hot chocolate. Peppermint, orange, cinnamon, cassia, and cardamom essential oil all make great additions to hot chocolate. Instruct guests to just dip a toothpick in the oil and then swish the toothpick around in their hot chocolate. Click here for a great hot chocolate recipe.

Once everyone has helped themselves to hot chocolate and is sitting comfortably, this is a great time to share information about essential oils. You could focus on the health benefits of the oils you offered as hot chocolate mix-ins, provide basic introductory information about essential oils, discuss essential oils for winter wellness, or talk about cooking with essential oils.

Enhance Emotional Well-Being with Essential Oils
Use the diffusing pages and the “Emotions and Essential Oils” pages to teach how the natural aromas of essential oils can affect the mind and emotions. Lead the members of the class through various mental and emotional conditions found in the Personal Usage Guide section such as anxiety, calming, concentration, depression, grief/sorrow, memory, mental fatigue, relaxing, shock, stress, and uplifting. Allow individuals to smell the various oils or oil blends for emotional well-being, and invite them to create their own nasal inhaler using 1–3 oils (for a total of 5–8 drops) to take home with them.

If you have a great class idea that others can do with this booklet, please share it with us!

How to Hold a Make & Take Class

Make-and-take classes are surging in popularity because they are easy to hold, give your attendees hands-on experience, and allow your guests to leave with something containing essential oils to use at home. Essential oils often sell themselves if they can be introduced with adequate information and something simple for your new contact to try.

at_eo_mt_class_studentMake-and-take classes (and other essential oil classes, for that matter) can seem quite daunting, but they don’t have to be! In this post, we will show you a simple outline that can be adapted to whatever make-and-take class you choose to do.

When planning for a class, you will need to do the following:

  1. Select a date, time, and location. Keep in mind who you want to attend when deciding these things, but don’t get caught up in trying to make it work for everyone—you can always hold more than one of the same class.
  2. Invite people, and remind them about it a week before and the day before the class.
  3. Order your materials. AromaTools has a lot of ingredients and containers that are commonly used for essential oil DIY projects. AromaTools also offers a free event program and additional resources to help you with your classes. Click here for more information.
  4. Gather essential oils and other needed materials. Print any instructions, handouts, and labels as needed.at_eo_mt_class_supplies
  5. Prepare a short lesson. The length of your lesson can depend on how much time it will take for your make-and-take project. If you try to keep your lesson to less than 30 minutes, you should have enough time for questions and your make-and-take project. Here are a few ideas for lesson topics:
    • the basics of essential oils;
    • how essential oils support a specific body system;
    • the most common essential oils and how to use them;
    • essential oils for [fill in the blank] (children, pregnancy, animals, emotions, cooking, cleaning, weight loss, exercising, basic first aid, women, romance, winter wellness, etc.).

    Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils can be a great resource in helping you plan your lesson.at_me8_lifestyle2

  6. Hold your class. Remember to keep it simple: give your short lesson; answer questions; show how to do the make-and-take project; then let your guests do their project, mingle, eat refreshments, and leave.
  7. Follow up. If you were introducing anyone to essential oils through your class, make sure to contact them later that week and answer any further questions they have or invite them to another class later.

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These are a few things you will need to consider when preparing for your class:

  • Decide if you want to discuss any business opportunities or keep the lesson education-based. If you do want to market a specific essential oil company, be careful not to make any health claims about the essential oils; speaking generally about health benefits is better. You can always give your class attendees an “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet or refer them to other information that provides more specific uses for essential oils.
  • Decide if and how you want to charge for the make-and-take project. Some charge a flat fee for their classes; others give their attendees 1 free item and charge for extras; and some provide (or charge for) materials but not the essential oils.
  • Depending on the make-and-take item, you may want to prepare a sample ahead of time so you can show the finished product.
  • Figure out how to set up your make-and-take station(s). Make sure to have at least one station and arrange it so the attendees can either all make the project at the same time or walk down a line to put together their item. Of course, the way you set this up depends on the number of attendees, the project, the supplies you have on hand, etc.
  • It’s a good idea to have printed instructions of how to make the item so your attendees can refer to it as they make their product and be able to take it home with them so they can make more if desired. You may even want to provide labels so your attendees can remember what they made and what they can do with it after the class.
  • Other optional suggestions include holding a drawing to get contact information, offering refreshments, and providing additional handouts or prizes.

If you would like some specific class ideas, check out our Essential Oil Class Ideas category. Also, feel free to browse our Essential Ideas category for more make-and-take class projects and topics:

Do you have any tips for holding an essential oil make-and-take class? Let us know in the comments below! 

Class Idea: Make & Take Autumn Room Sprays

Seasons are changing, and autumn time is here. The leaves are changing colors and falling on the ground. Along with these changes, we begin to notice different smells such as apples baking, pumpkins and squashes cooking, and sweet spices like cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, cardamom, and ginger. Maybe you aren’t surrounded by those smells, but wish that you were. Well, we’ve got the solution and essential oils to make it easy for you!

You will love how these room sprays bring the autumn scents into your home! You could just make them for yourself, but why not turn it into an easy essential oil make-and-take class and share the love with others?

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The idea for this class is really simple:

  1. Invite all the people you want. Make sure to remind them about the class a week before and the day before, because people really do forget.
  2. Order these items from AromaTools (aromatools.com):
  3. Gather the rest of your materials. These are the other items you will need:
    • Essential oils: cinnamon, ginger, clove, orange, cardamom, rosemary, and patchouli
    • Distilled water
    • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) measuring spoon(s)
    • Scissors (for cutting out the labels)
    • Funnels (helpful, but optional)
  4. Print off these instructions on regular paper and these labels on the blank label sheets from AromaTools.
  5. Prepare a short lesson about essential oils and their benefits. A great topic to discuss is how the essential oils in these sprays have antibacterial properties and can help purify the air and support the immune system. Remember to keep the lesson free of health claims and speak generally of supporting the immune system rather than listing specific conditions if you plan on discussing any business opportunities with an essential oil company. You can find great information for your lesson in Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils. Here are a few pages from the 8th Edition to help you get started: pp. 6–10; 28; 29; 218–19; 288.
  6. Make one of each of the sprays listed below before the class so your attendees can try them and choose a scent they would like to make.
  7. Prepare your make-and-take stations. Set up the materials so it is easy for everyone to make their room spray. It is up to you whether or not you charge your attendees for making make one or more sprays, but we suggest allowing each attendee one free spray and charging for extras if they desire more than one. Make sure to have enough instruction sheets to allow each attendee to take one home in case they would like to make any of the other sprays on their own.
  8. Offer refreshments, if desired.

This is a great class to simply give your attendees a little information about essential oils, time for asking questions, and a fun autumn-scented spray to take home with them. If you want to discuss the business side of essential oils, this class is an easy one to do that as well.

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Fall Room Sprays

  • Servings: Yield=2 Tbsp. (30 ml)
  • Time: 2–5 minutes active
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. Pour glycerin and essential oil in the spray bottle; swirl to combine.
  2. Fill the rest of the bottle up with distilled water. Screw the lid on, and shake to mix. If possible, let sit overnight before using to allow the ingredients to integrate.
  3. To use, spray around the room as needed. Do not spray directly in the face.

Essential Oil Autumn Blends:

Pumpkin Spice:
3 drops cinnamon
2 drops ginger
2 drops clove
2 drops orange
1 drop cardamom
Spiced Chai:
3 drops cardamon
2 drops cinnamon
2 drops clove
1 drop ginger
Orange Pomander:
4 drops orange
2 drops clove
2 drops rosemary
Fall Leaves:
6 drops orange
1 drop patchouli
1 drop ginger
Autumn Spice:
4 drops orange
3 drops ginger
2 drops cinnamon
Snickerdoodle:
5 drops orange
2 drops cinnamon
1 drop clove

Build Your Business with “Modern Essentials™ Living”

Have you heard about the Modern Essentials™ Living book? This amazing resource contains cooking recipes, craft ideas, cleaning recipes, body care recipes, class ideas, diffuser blends, and a chart listing common uses for many essential oils and blends. It introduces essential oils in a way that is completely marketing compliant, so it is a safe resource to use in any setting! We want to discuss a few ways you can use Modern Essentials™ Living to help build your business.

Use Modern Essentials™ Living in Your Classes

Modern Essentials™ Living is a perfect resource to use in any marketing or educational class. Here are a few ideas for how to use this book in a class setting:

  • Use one of the class ideas suggested in Modern Essentials™ Living on pp. 189–202. As you apply a facial mask, make jewelry, drink hot chocolate, make cleaning sprays, or make wintertime shower disks, you can talk about the essential oils and even discuss how to make money by being a distributor.
  • You don’t have to stick to our class ideas—you can come up with your own! Try teaching an essential oil cooking class by making one of the food recipes in Modern Essentials™ Living. As you cook, discuss the tips and tricks found on pp. 9–17 for using essential oils in your cooking.
  • DIY classes (also known as make-and-take classes) are very popular because they tend to be more interactive and let your attendees leave with something to try that contains essential oils. Try holding a make-and-take class of your own, and use the craft, body care, cleaning, or holiday ideas in Modern Essentials™ Living as your DIY project. Don’t forget to introduce the essential oils and let your attendees know where they can purchase them.
  • Have a few copies of Modern Essentials™ Living on hand to pass around your classes. This is a great way to show “newbies” all the different ways you can use essential oils other than the standard application methods. You may even have some people ask to buy one of your copies!
  • The Modern Essentials™ Living book can be used as a drawing prize. You can have your class attendees enter a drawing as they arrive (you may even want to offer this as an incentive to arrive early). Whenever you choose to close the drawing, select a winner and give him or her a copy of Modern Essentials™ Living!

Using Modern Essentials™ Living at Trade Shows

Running an essential oil booth at a trade show is the perfect example of marketing essential oils. But you need a way to get people interested in the essential oils without making health claims. This is where Modern Essentials™ Living can be beneficial! Here are a few ways you can use this book at a trade show:

  • Have several copies available for people to browse through. This can help them get an idea of how the oils can be used without you needing to explain it to them.
  • Make some of the products for people to try as they come to your booth. This can give them a way to experience essential oils aromatically and topically. If the venue allows it, you may even be able to offer essential oil food samples.
  • You may want to consider offering a class at another time and have interested people sign up for your classes while at the trade show. It is often difficult to relay all the information you would like to while having short conversations with passersby, so a class is a way you can educate interested parties a little more thoroughly. If you want to hold a make-and-take class, be sure to have the finished product available at the trade show to provide an example of what will be made in the class.

Use Modern Essentials™ Living to Build and Educate Your Team

One of the best ways to build an essential oil business is to educate your team members about the many ways essential oils can be used. Here are a few ideas of you can do this with Modern Essentials™ Living:

  • Send out an email every once in a while that contains a tip/trick about essential oils. Modern Essentials™ Living contains many bits of useful information including application methods, cooking tips, recipes, class ideas, diffuser blends, and even information about what each oil can do (found in the Quick Usage Chart). If you share information from the book, just make sure to reference it as your source and let your team members know where they can get a copy for themselves!
  • Keep a copy of the book in a waiting area at your office or home. Make sure it is visible and easy to pick up and browse through.
  • Another way Modern Essentials™ Living can be used is to offer it to clients who sign up under you or for rank advancements of your team members.


As you can see, there are many ways Modern Essentials™ Living can help you succeed in your essential oil business. Check out this article to learn more about this amazing resource and see sample pages: Introducing Modern Essentials™ Living.

Do you have any other ideas of how you can use this book to build your business? Comment below! We would love to hear them!

Class Idea: “Intro to Modern Essentials™” Scavenger Hunt

One of the tough things about giving someone a sample of an essential oil is that often that person doesn’t know what to do with it (other than whatever you tell them to). When you share essential oils with a “newbie,” it is important to also give them something containing more information about essential oils. The “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet is the perfect companion to essential oil samples!

What Is Great about This Booklet?

This little booklet is packed with a lot of great information! The first section introduces essential oils and teaches what they are and how they can be used to help enhance health and wellness. The 8th edition of this booklet now includes recipes for diffuser blends, roll-on blends, massage oil blends, bath salts recipes, and cooking guidelines in this section. The next section lists the 44 most common essential oils and some of the ways each one is used. In the last section, the Personal Guide, readers can discover which essential oils, essential oil blends, and essential oil–inspired supplements are commonly used for hundreds of different health conditions. Not only does this booklet give your “newbie” enough information to start using the essential oils, but there is also a place on the back to include your contact information so they know how to contact you if they wish to purchase more oils.

Introduction to Essential Oils Class Idea

The goal of this class is to help your attendees learn about essential oils and show them how to find answers to their essential oil questions.

Start the class with a short lesson introducing and explaining the essential oils. You can use the Introduction to Essential Oils section found in the “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet. Another great resource and handout is the “Modern Essentials™: An Introduction to Essential Oils” Tear Pad. You can also use the Science and Application section found in Modern Essentials™ (the large book) for even more information. We recommend reading this section, if possible, so you are better able to answer any questions your students may have.

Conduct a scavenger hunt activity. Pass out an “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet to everyone in the class. (We recommend letting them take their booklet home with them as a free gift. Make sure to include your contact information on the back!)

Here’s how to do the scavenger hunt activity:

  • You (the teacher) ask a question from the list (7th edition list) (8th edition list).
  • Everyone (all class attendees) tries to find the answer in their booklet.
  • The first person to find the answer raises their hand and waits to be called on to state the answer and where they found it.
  • Give a little time so everyone can also find the answer by going to that page. During this time, you can pass the winner a small treat (this is optional but fun!).
  • Repeat with a new question.

Doing a scavenger hunt activity can not only help bring some fun to your class and make it memorable, but it also gives your students a reason to look through the “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet. As they look through it and find the answers to the questions, they will learn so much about the essential oils and what essential oils can do for specific conditions. It also helps them learn how they can use the booklet to find answers to their own questions. Doing this activity will increase the likelihood of your attendees trying the essentials oils and even purchasing more.

Open the class up for questions. Be sure to leave time to answer questions your attendees have. Try to keep the questions in this class focused more on the essential oils and their benefits. Refrain from marketing a particular brand of essential oils, but rather refer them to another class (even if you hold your marketing class after a 10-minute break) to learn more about where they can purchase essential oils. Remember: Your goal with this class is to help your attendees learn more about the essential oils and how to find information about which oil(s) to use for their health challenges.

This class idea was suggested to us by Jenny Keller. Do you have a class idea you would like to share with others? If so, fill out this survey or comment below. We would love to hear from you!

This “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet makes a great mini textbook for essential oil classes. Click here to see more ideas for using this booklet in your classes!

EO Life Hack: Use a Hole Punch for EO Samples

Have you ever been worried that your essential oil sample will get lost or that the person you gave it to won’t know how to use it? Worry no more! You can use a 1/2″ hole punch to attach an essential oil sample bottle to almost any paper product (such as your business card, essential oil information, brochures, recipe cards, Modern Essentials™ Reference Cards, etc.). Just punch a hole in an open spot, push the sample bottle through the opening, and screw on the lid to hold it in place. Now the receiver will be able to easily keep the essential oil sample and information together!

Get Organized with an Essential Oil Business Binder!

Do you have an essential oil business and need a way to stay organized? Keeping your business-related documents organized can help you push forward in your business-building adventures. This binder can help you keep the documents you need together and accessible for when you go to business meetings, mentor business builders in your downline, and keep track of information that you can use when filing your taxes.

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To create an essential oil business binder, we suggest getting a 3-ring binder and including the below sections and pages. We have designed a few different files that you are welcome to print off and include in your binder. Here are the sections we have included:

My Business Goals Page

If you really want to make your business into something that will provide an income, you need to set some goals to help you stay focused as you build your business. This page provides space for you to set 3 goals and list the steps you need to take in order to accomplish them. If you have more goals than this, try to narrow them down to your top 3 goals so you don’t get overwhelmed. As you accomplish these goals, make new goals so you can continue pressing forward. This page should be placed somewhere that you will see it often to help you remember where to focus your energy. For general help making goals, click here.

Essential Oil Business Planner

This section includes a 2016 calendar, a monthly calendar, and a weekly goal-setting page. The 2016 calendar gives you a general view of the year. The monthly calendar is not specific to a month, so you can print off as many pages as you want and fill in that information. Another way this calendar can be used is to laminate it and write on it with a fine-tip dry erase marker. The weekly goals page can also be laminated and be used to help you plan out your week and assign smaller goals (or the steps to the larger goals) to your week.

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Essential Oil Business Contacts

This section includes a contact information page that can help you keep track of the contact information of your upline, downline, AromaTools™, or other business contact information. We also suggest getting business card–size sleeve protectors to help you store your own business cards and those you receive from others.

The other page in this section, called My Business Builders Info, will help you keep track of the people in your downline that also want to build an essential oil business. This page will be useful in keeping track of information that you can use to help mentor them. One of the best ways to build a good downline is to teach and mentor those who are also interested in building a business; so use this page to take notes about them and their goals so you can follow up each time you do a mentoring session.

Essential Oil Business Samples

The best way to get someone to buy essential oils is to offer a sample that they can try. People often fall in love with the essential oils and the benefits they receive when using the oils. Giving a person the chance to simply try out the oils before making a purchase will increase the likelihood of making a sale or signing someone up under you. An important thing to keep in mind is that some people just like free stuff and have no intention of purchasing, so we suggest you don’t give out more than 3 samples per contact. The Sample Tracker page helps you keep track of who you have given a sample to so you can follow up with them at a later date and see how the oils worked for them. Following up on the people you gave samples to will help make sure your samples aren’t going to waste and that you are getting a return on your investment.

AT_EOBB_SampleTracker

The Essential Oil Sample Inventory Page is useful if you make a number of samples ahead of time, so you can keep track of the oils you are giving out in samples. This can be useful information for a number of reasons such as:

  • knowing what oils are the most popular,
  • helping you keep popular samples in stock,
  • and analyzing your costs for samples.

The Essential Oil Business Inventory pages can also help you keep track of the oils or other products that you are using solely for business purposes. There is also a Wishlist page where you can write down oils or accessories that you want to get when you place your next order. On the Wishlist page, you can include a note about where to buy the item, how many you want, or who you are buying it for.

Essential Oil Business Tracking Sheets

Included in this section are a number of tracking sheets that may help when filing taxes. These tracking sheets are the following:

  • Expense Tracker
  • Income Tracker
  • Mileage Tracker

If you are reporting your essential oil business with your taxes, it is useful to keep track of your income and expenses so you know exactly what to report. If you travel a lot for your business, you can keep track of your mileage to report as a business expense.

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Essential Oil Business Information

This section is a great place to include any business information, such as how your specific essential oil company compensates or the benefits they provide. Anything with the marketing icon on aromatools.com can be used to help promote your essential oil business.
AT_EOBB_EOInformationThe following are some of our most popular products that would be great to include with your binder:

Essential Oil Business Notes

This lined page helps you keep your notes in one place. We suggest printing this page double sided and including a few in your binder. If you tend to write a lot of notes, you can include a notebook instead. Use this section when you attend classes and gather information or when you are being mentored by your upline members.

Files Available for Download

We have created 4 different designs and some simple refill pages if you wish to save printer ink for the files that you tend to print multiple copies of.

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We hope you are able to utilize some of our ideas to help you get your essential oil business organized this year!

Don’t have an essential oil business? Check out our Essential Oil Notebook for staying organized with your personal essential oil use.

Class Idea: Make & Take Aromatherapy Clay Jewelry

Have you ever wanted to try making your own aromatherapy clay jewelry? When you make your own, you can customize it however you wish. The downside of making your own jewelry is that if you are only wanting to make one or two pieces, the cost for the materials may be more than the cost of buying the finished product (you can buy aromatherapy jewelry at AromaTools™). So, here’s a fun idea that can help minimize the cost and allow you to make your own jewelry: host an essential oil jewelry make-and-take class!

Simply invite a few oil–loving friends or even potential oil lovers over for a fun night making clay jewelry. Have them bring a stamp or two and any ribbons or cord materials they may have; and if you are looking to share the costs, you can even ask them to bring a dollar or two for materials.

If you are inviting people who are new to essential oils, you may want to consider preparing a very short lesson about what essential oils are, how they are beneficial when used aromatically, and why aromatherapy jewelry is a great way to achieve these benefits. Present your lesson in the beginning before showing everyone the materials and how to make the jewelry. Then spend the rest of the time making clay pendants and beads, answering questions about essential oils, or simply enjoying the company of friends!

If you are doing this as a class or group activity, just follow steps 1–6 in the recipe below (until they need to air dry); and then let them take their pendants home and finish them on their own.

Here’s a simple breakdown of the process:
Step-by-StepClayPendant4_1000

The best thing about making your own clay jewelry is that you can make something that is your style, in whatever color you wish, and with whatever design you desire. You can even make something a boy would love to carry around or have in his room! And, you aren’t limited to just jewelry. Even though necklace pendants are pretty popular, you can make charm bracelets, earrings, keychain pendants, car air fresheners, bathroom diffusers, etc. The possibilities are endless, so the hardest part is deciding what to make!

Aromatherapy Clay Jewelry

  • Time: 30–45 minutes active; 24–72 hours inactive
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • Air-dry white or terra-cotta clay (The Crayola Air-Dry brand works well.)
  • Food coloring (optional; used for dying the white clay any color you desire)
  • Rolling pin
  • Cutout object (This can be a circular hairspray cap, small cookie cutters, or anything else to cut out the clay into the shape you desire. When making pendants for necklaces, you will want the size to be less than 1 1/4 inch in diameter. If you are making bracelets, you will want the size to be around 3/4 inch in diameter. Other stationary objects like bathroom diffusers can be larger.)
  • Stamps (sized to fit the shape of your clay item)
  • Chopstick or shish kebab stick (This is used to make a hole for the cord. It needs to be big enough to fit 2 strands of string through.)
  • Wax paper
  • Sand paper (Optional)
  • Paints (Optional)
  • Ribbon, string, cord, or other jewelry-making materials
  • Essential oil(s)

Instructions:

  1. Lay out a section of wax paper on a table to create your work station. This will help with cleanup and make it easier to roll out the clay and move the pieces.
  2. Optional step: Take a glob of the clay and color it using food coloring if desired. (Note: The clay always dries to be a lighter color.) (*Helpful hint: to make sure the food coloring stays in the clay and doesn’t drip off, create a well in the top of the piece of clay with your finger, drop only 2 drops of coloring in the well at a time, fold the clay so it closes over the well opening, and then continue to knead the clay as normal. If it starts to feel dry, just add a few drops of water.)
  3. Roll out the clay on the wax paper. You want it about 1/8–1/4 inch for pendants smaller than 1 1/4 inches. If you are creating larger pendant diffusers for a small room, you may want it to be thicker so it doesn’t break as easily.
  4. Use your cutout object to cut out the pendants. With the remaining clay, you can form beads by rolling it into small pieces and poking a hole through them with the chopstick or other stick.
  5. Stamp your design on the pendants, and poke a hole through each of them for the cord with the chopstick or other stick.
  6. Transfer pendants and beads to a paper plate, and allow them to air dry for 2–3 days.
  7. Once dry, you can sand rough edges with sandpaper, decorate with paint, and/or finish making them into a piece of jewelry.
  8. When figuring out the length of cord you will need, position the cord around the wrist or neck to the length you desire. Then cut double the length you think you will need. (You can always cut more off if it ends up being too long. We have found that adding any beads or knots takes up more string than you think it will).
  9. Put the ends together, creating a loop at the other end. String the pendant through the loop and the cut ends through the loop, securing the pendant in the middle before adding any beads.
  10. If desired, a bead can be used to make a clasp for a necklace or bracelet by tying the bead to one side and making a loop big enough to go around the bead on the other side and securing it with a knot.
  11. To use, simply place a drop of essential oil on the pendant, and rub the oil around. After a minute, the clay should have soaked up the oil and begun to diffuse. Reapply oil as the scent fades.

Let’s not forget that Mother’s Day is coming up; so think about all the great gifts this project could make for the special women in your life! It is so easy, even a kid could do it! In fact, this would be a great Mother’s Day gift from a child.

Make & Take Class Idea: Natural Cleaning Sprays

With the weather turning warmer, you may be getting anxious to start your spring cleaning…or you may be dreading it. Either way, making all-natural cleaners can help you get started on the right foot! But rather than simply making the cleaners on your own, why not turn it into a Make & Take Essential Oil Class?

Prepare a Short Lesson on Essential Oils

Start the class with a little lesson about the basics of essential oils and how they can help boost the effectiveness of your cleaning products. You can find information about these topics in Modern Essentials. Check out the “Introduction to Essential Oils” (p. 6–10) and “Kitchen and Bathroom Cleaning and Disinfecting” (p. 60) sections of the Science & Application section of Modern Essentials as well as the “Housecleaning” section (p. 260) in the Personal Usage Guide section for help in planning your lesson.

“Many essential oils have demonstrated the ability to inhibit or kill various types of bacteria, mold spores, and even viruses. These disinfectant properties of essential oils make them a natural substitute for the harsh chemicals used in many commercial cleaners. Essential oils can also work as natural deodorizers, without the artificial fragrances used in some products” (Modern Essentials, p. 60).

After presenting your short lesson about essential oils to your class, allow your students time to make their own cleaning spray, ask you questions, or look up conditions in a Modern Essentials book.

Figure Out How You Will Do the Make & Take Workshop

There are a few different ways you can approach the workshop portion of the class. First, figure out which recipes you want to use, and then gather the necessary items. You can use any of the following recipes, the recipes found in the “Kitchen and Bathroom Cleaning and Disinfecting” section found in Modern Essentials, or any recipes of your own. If using the recipes below, the only items you will need are 8 oz. glass spray bottles, essential oils, and a few household ingredients such as water, white vinegar, Castile Soap, rubbing alcohol, cornstarch, and measuring cups/spoons.

We have also designed some labels and recipe cards for the cleaning sprays in this post. Feel free to print these out and use them for your class:
Click here to download the labels. These labels will fit on this label sheet.
Click here to download the recipes.

The following are some ideas for doing this Make & Take Class:

  • Give away a cleaning spray to those who are new to essential oils or to those who sign up with you at your class.
  • Charge per cleaning spray your attendees create. Just figure out the cost for all the items needed to make each spray, and let them make as many as they want and be charged accordingly. Make sure to include tax and shipping costs that you may have paid when figuring the cost. Do these calculations beforehand, and create a price sheet so you can easily reference it during the class.
  • Offer a kit price. If you are offering a few different recipes for sprays, you may want to come up with a kit price that allows them to make one of all the different cleaning sprays.
  • Figure out costs without oils. If you are doing this class as something fun for people who already use essential oils, you can have them bring their own oils or make the spray without the oils and have them add the oils later. This would reduce the cost for each spray, so you may want to calculate those costs beforehand.
  • Charge only for the bottle. Since all of the ingredients are pretty inexpensive and can be used for a variety of purposes (or may even be items you already own), you may want to consider only charging for the glass spray bottle. When calculating the price, make sure to include any tax or shipping costs. If you do this, you can offer a flat price and let your students choose which cleaner they want to make or how many they want to make without the hassle of explaining the various prices.

Recipes for Cleaning Sprays

When making these recipes, you can adjust the oils to your preferences or to the preferences of your class attendees. Modern Essentials recommends the following disinfecting oils: Protective Blend, lemon, Cleansing Blend, melaleuca, lime, cinnamon, thyme, and peppermint (p. 60).

All-Purpose Cleaner (with Castile Soap)

  • Servings: Yield = 8 oz.
  • Time: 3 minutes
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

Instructions:

Pour Castile Soap and essential oils into the glass bottle. Swish mixture to combine. Fill the rest of the bottle with water. Screw on the spray top, and shake to combine. Shake before using. Use to clean; then spray on a vinegar-water solution after to clean away any soap scum.

Alternate All-Purpose Cleaner (with Vinegar)

  • Servings: Yield = 8 oz.
  • Time: 2 minutes
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

Instructions:

Drop essential oils into the glass bottle. Add vinegar, and then fill the rest of the bottle with water. Screw on the spray top, and shake to combine. Shake before using.

Streak-Free Mirror/Glass Cleaner

  • Servings: Yield = 8 oz.
  • Time: 3 minutes
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbsp. white vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp. rubbing alcohol
  • 1 1/2 tsp. cornstarch (this is what makes it streak-free!)
  • 8–10 drops citrus essential oil (lemon, lime, grapefruit, etc.)
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 8 oz. glass spray bottle

Instructions:

Mix together all ingredients except water in a spray bottle. Screw on the spray top, and shake to combine. Unscrew the spray top, and fill the rest of the bottle with water. Screw on the spray top, and shake to combine.

Dusting Spray/Wood Furniture Cleaner

  • Servings: Yield = 8 oz.
  • Time: 3 minutes
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 1 tsp. olive oil
  • 5–10 drops essential oil (lemon or white fir are commonly used)
  • 3 Tbsp. white vinegar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 8 oz. glass spray bottle

Instructions:

Mix all ingredients together except water in a spray bottle. Swish mixture to combine. Fill the rest of the bottle with water. Screw on the spray top, and shake to combine. Shake before using.

Source: Modern Essentials, Sixth Edition

Essential Oil Hot Chocolate Social

Next time you need to plan an essential oil event, consider holding a hot chocolate social! This is a great idea for a team meeting or for a class to introduce new clients to essential oils.

Hot-Chocolate-Social

Provide hot chocolate and various hot chocolate toppings, such as whipped cream, crushed candy cane, marshmallows, and chocolate chips. Also provide various essential oils to add to the hot chocolate. Peppermint, orange, and cassia essential oil all make great additions to hot chocolate. Instruct guests to just dip a toothpick in the oil and then swish the toothpick around in their hot chocolate.

Once everyone has helped themselves to hot chocolate and is sitting comfortably, this is a great time to share information about essential oils. You could focus on the health benefits of the oils you offered as hot chocolate mix-ins, provide basic introductory information about essential oils, discuss essential oils for winter wellness, or talk about cooking with essential oils.

Make sure that everyone is comfortable, enjoys some delicious hot chocolate, and has a really fun and positive experience! Be sure to send information about essential oils home with your guests so that they can continue to learn more about essential oils. It’s also really great if you can send your guests home with a sample of essential oil to try out for themselves.

If you’d like to make your own hot chocolate, here is a fun recipe:

Peppermint Hot Chocolate with Essential Oil

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 10 minutes
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 Tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp. sugar or other sweetener
  • Pinch of salt
  • 3/4 cup canned coconut milk (shake before opening)
  • 1 1/2 cups milk (almond or rice milk work too)
  • 1–2 drops peppermint essential oil

Instructions:

  1. In a saucepan, mix together the cocoa powder, salt, and sugar.
  2. Add coconut milk, and heat until combined.
  3. Slowly add milk while continuing to stir. Keep stirring until little bubbles start to form on the surface.
  4. Remove from heat. Allow to cool slightly. Stir in a drop or two of peppermint essential oil.
  5. Pour into mugs, and serve. Warning: It will be hot, so allow the hot chocolate to cool to a reasonable temperature before drinking.
  6. Top with whipped cream, marshmallows, chocolate chips, or ground peppermint candy.