Essential Oil Spotlight: Basil


Basil essential oil (Ocimum basilicum CT linalool) is steam-distilled from the leaves, stems, and flowers of the basil plant. This oil is characteristically known for its herbaceous, spicy, anise-like, camphorous, and lively aroma.

Anciently, basil was used to treat respiratory problems, digestive and kidney ailments, epilepsy, poisonous insect or snake bites, fevers, epidemics, and malaria. The French have historically used basil to help aid migraines, mental fatigue, and menstrual periods.

Today basil is most commonly used for autism, bee/hornet stings, bronchitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, cramps (abdominal), earache, hiatal hernia, incisional hernia, infertility, mouth ulcers, muscular dystrophy, ovarian cyst, and viral hepatitis. This essential oil primarily affects the cardiovascular system, muscles, and skeletal system.

Basil contains antibacterial, antidepressant, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antispasmodic (powerful), antiviral, decongestant (veins, arteries of the lungs, prostate), diuretic, disinfectant (urinary/pulmonary), energizing, stimulant (nerves, adrenal cortex), and uplifting health properties.

Other possible uses of basil oil include anxiety, chills, concentration, digestion, fainting, insect repellent, chronic mucus, vomiting, and whooping cough.

Applications of Basil Essential Oil and Safety Data:

Topical Application: Basil can be applied neat (with no dilution) directly to the area of concern and reflex points. Dilute with a carrier oil when using on sensitive skin or children (see safety data below).
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma directly. The aroma of basil helps one maintain an open mind and increases clarity of thought.
Internal Application: Basil is recognized as safe for internal consumption by the FDA and may be used as a food flavoring agent or taken in capsules.
Safety Data: Basil is not to be consumed internally by children under 6 years old and should be used with caution and in greater dilution for children 6 years old and older. The use of this oil should be avoided during pregnancy. Basil should not be used by people with epilepsy. This oil may also irritate sensitive skin; test by applying to a small area before continuing application.

5 Ways to Use Basil Essential Oil:

1. Massage
There’s nothing like a simple soothing massage with some of your favorite essential oils to calm your mood. Try these massage blends to help boost your mental health and aid carpal tunnel syndrome.

Mental Fatigue Massage Blend
4 drops basil essential oil
4 drops lemon essential oil
4 drops juniper essential oil
2 Tbsp. (25 ml) carrier oil or butter
Combine essential oils with your favorite carrier oil or butter, and lightly massage into your neck, hands, and feet.
Carpal Tunnel Massage Oil
3 drops basil essential oil
3 drops marjoram essential oil
2 drops lemongrass essential oil
2 drops cypress essential oil
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) Fractionated Coconut Oil
Blend oils together, and massage gently into your arm from your shoulder down to your fingertips. You can also make this massage oil in a roll-on bottle for easier application.

2. Earache
Basil is great for helping to dull painful earaches. Add 1 drop each of basil and melaleuca to a cotton ball, and hold over the ear canal for 30 minutes. Do not place directly into the ear canal.

3. Diffuse
Basil’s aroma can have an amazing influence, as it helps one maintain an open mind and increases clarity of thought. Try out some of these diffuser blends to help you focus and engage better in all your endeavors.

4. Bath
Bath salts are perfect for relaxing, but they are also a great way to soak up the benefits of essential oils. Try out the following recipe to help calm your anxiety and energize your body. Remember that basil may irritate sensitive skin, so be careful and dilute further if necessary.

Calm the Anxiety Bath Salts
2 cups (500 g) Epsom Salt
1/2 tsp. (2 g) baking powder
1 tsp. (5 ml) Sweet Almond Oil
3 drops lime essential oil
2 drops basil essential oil
16 oz. PET Jar
Combine salt and baking powder. In a separate bowl, mix essential oils with almond oil. If desired, mix in a few drops of food coloring. Slowly stir oils into the salt mixture, and blend well. Allow the salts to sit for a couple hours in order for the salt to soak up the scent. Add 1/2–1 cup (125–250 g) of salt mixture to your bath under the running tap.

5. Cooking
Basil essential oil is a great ingredient to add to your kitchen. This oil can add rich flavor to any of your recipes with just a drop or less. When adding basil essential oil to your food, start with a toothpick dipped in the oil and stirred into the mixture, and add more until you reach the desired taste. Keep in mind that cooking (or heating) the oil tones down the bold flavor. Here are some of our favorite recipes with basil essential oil!

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, pp. 38–39.
Aromatherapy Blends & Remedies by Franzesca Watson
Organic Beauty With Essential Oil by Rebecca Park Totilo

Essential Oil Spotlight: Rosemary

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) essential oil is steam-distilled from the flowering rosemary plant. It is known for its herbaceous, strong, camphoraceous odor, with woody-balsamic and evergreen undertones. The aroma of rosemary can stimulate memory and open the conscious mind.

Historically, the rosemary plant was regarded as sacred by many civilizations and was used to protect against infectious diseases. Today, rosemary essential oil is most commonly used for addictions (alcohol), arthritis, cancer, cellulite, constipation, diabetes, fainting, flu (influenza), inflammation, lice, low blood pressure, sinusitis, and vaginal infections.

Rosemary affects the immune, respiratory, and nervous systems and contains the following health properties: analgesic, antibacterial, anticancer, anticatarrhal, antifungal, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and expectorant.

Other possible uses of rosemary essential oil include bronchitis, colds, nervous exhaustion, immune system (stimulate), preventing respiratory infections, and stress-related illnesses.

Applications of Rosemary Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Rosemary essential oil can be applied neat (with no dilution), or dilute 1:1 (1 drop essential oil to 1 drop carrier oil) for children and those with sensitive skin.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale aroma directly. The aroma of rosemary stimulates memory and opens the conscious mind.
Internal Application: Take in capsules, or place 1–2 drops under the tongue. Rosemary can also be used as a flavoring in cooking.
Safety Data: Avoid using rosemary during pregnancy. Not for use by people with epilepsy. Avoid if dealing with high blood pressure. Not to be used internally for children under 6 years old; use with caution and greater dilution for children 6 years old and over.

5 Ways to Use Rosemary Essential Oil

1. Diffuser Blends
With the incredible properties of rosemary essential oil, you can’t resist trying it in this “Study Buddy” diffuser blend to aid you in your studies or whenever you need a mental boost. Also try some of these other blends with rosemary to enhance your life!

2. Roll-ons
Rosemary is extremely valuable when it comes to roll-ons. These great roll-on blends are sure to help with constipation and joint soreness. Just add these oils to a 5 ml roll-on bottle, and fill the remainder of the bottle with fractionated coconut oil or another carrier oil of your choice.

Constipation Relief
1 drop rosemary
1 drop lemon
1 drop peppermint
1 tsp. (5ml) Fractionated Coconut Oil
Apply to stomach and back, and gently massage in. This is a 4% dilution, so it is safe to use daily or as needed.
Sore Joint Relief
3 drops eucalyptus
3 drops peppermint
3 drops rosemary
1 tsp. (5ml) Fractionated Coconut Oil
Apply on location, and then apply an ice pack on top. This is a 10% dilution, so it should not be used daily. If you would like to use this roll-on daily, add the same amount of essential oils to 2 tsp. (10 ml) of fractionated coconut oil in a 10 ml roll-on bottle.

3. Bath
Baths have always been regarded as a simple way to relax, calm nerves, and energize the body. Try some of these easy bath ideas using rosemary essential oil for a nice pick-me-up. Just combine the ingredients, and dissolve 1/2 cup (120 g) of salt mixture under the running tap for a soothing warm bath.

Hangover Pick-Me-Up
5 drops grapefruit
2 drops rosemary
1 drop juniper berry
1 cup (240 g) Epsom Salt
Good Morning Bath
2 drops lemon
2 drops lavender
2 drops rosemary
1/2 cup (120 g) Epsom Salt

4. Massage
Massage is a great way to use rosemary because of its anti-inflammatory properties and how it affects the nervous system. Try this massage blend for a soothing and stress-relieving massage.

Stress-Release Massage Oil
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) Sweet Almond Oil
3 drops bergamot
2 drops rosemary

5. Cooking
Rosemary is a popular flavor, and the herb can be easily substituted with essential oil for the same rich flavor. Start by dipping a toothpick in the oil and stirring that into your food, and add more until you achieve the desired flavor. Here are some delicious recipes for you to try using rosemary essential oil:

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, pp. 94–95.
Organic Beauty with Essential Oil by Rebecca Park Totilo

Essential Oil Spotlight: Frankincense

Frankincense (Boswellia frereana, Boswellia carterii, Boswellia sacra) essential oil is steam-distilled from the gum/resin of Burseraceae trees and shrubs. It is well known for its rich, deep, warm, balsamic, and sweet odor.

Frankincense has been used historically as a holy oil in the Middle East. Today it is primarily used for arthritis, asthma, balance, brain (injury), cancer, depression, inflammation, memory, scar prevention, and warts. Frankincense contains anticatarrhal, anticancer, antidepressant, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antitumor, expectorant, immune stimulant, and sedative health properties.

Other common uses of frankincense include aging, bronchitis, diarrhea, herpes, meningitis, sciatic pain, stress, tonsillitis, and wounds. It contains sesquiterpenes, enabling it to go beyond the blood-brain barrier, and can also help the body against infection. It affects emotional balance, the immune and nervous systems, and skin.

Applications of Frankincense Essential Oil and Safety Data:

Topical Application: Frankincense can be applied neat (with no dilution) directly to the area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma of frankincense directly. The aroma of frankincense helps to focus energy, improve concentration, and minimize distractions.
Internal Application: Frankincense can be taken internally. Place 1–2 drops under the tongue, or take in a capsule. Dilute 1 drop oil in 1 tsp. (5 ml) honey or in 1/2 cup (125 ml) of beverage.
Safety Data: For internal application, frankincense is not for children under 6 years old and should be used in greater dilution for children 6 years old and older.

5 Ways to Use Frankincense Essential Oil:

1. Diffuse
Here are some great diffuser blends to help you concentrate and focus your energy.

2. Roll-on Blends
The anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties of frankincense make this an ideal oil to use for arthritis pains. Frankincense is great for your skin and can help to prevent and repair scars. Frankincense has a powerful effect on emotions and helps to focus energy, improve concentration, and minimize distractions—all very helpful when you need to communicate effectively! Try these roll-ons if you need help in these areas:

Arthritis Roll-on
3 drops frankincense
4 drops peppermint
2 drops marjoram
2 tsp. (10 ml) Fractionated
Coconut Oil
Scar Roll-on
4 drops frankincense
4 drops helichrysum
2 tsp. (10 ml) Sweet Almond Oil
Communication
Enhancement Roll-on

5 drops frankincense
5 drops clary sage
5 drops sandalwood
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil
Add essential oils to a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the remainder of the bottle with a carrier oil. Apply the formula to the area of concern (for the Communication Enhancement blend, apply to upper chest, back of the neck, and shoulders). These blends are a 5% dilution, so you can use them daily if needed.

3. Direct Application
Frankincense can be used directly without dilution. Try these simple solutions:

  • Confusion: Inhale frankincense aroma directly from bottle, or rub a drop on your hands and breathe in.
  • Headache: Rub 1 drop each of lavender, peppermint, and frankincense to the base of your neck and forehead, then cup your hands and breath in deep.
  • Inflammation from Injury: Combine 3 drops frankincense and 2 drops lavender in a bowl of cold water. Dampen a washcloth in the mixture, and hold on location for 15–30 minutes.

4. Massage Oil
Frankincense essential oil is helpful in lifting a depressed mood. Try using this massage blend when you are feeling a bit down.

Mood-Elevating Massage Blend
5 drops frankincense
5 drops ginger
5 drops grapefruit
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil
Combine these oils, and massage on the upper chest, back of the neck, and shoulders. Some common carrier oils for massage include Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, and Jojoba Oil.

5. Bath
Make a bath bomb with the following blend for a refreshing bath that is sure to help you breathe easy. You can also simply add this essential oil blend to 1/4 cup (60 g) epsom salt and add to your bath while filling.

Calm Breathing Bath Bomb:
6 drops frankincense
2 drops eucalyptus
2 drops lavender

To learn more about this amazing essential oil, see the book Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, pp. 94–95.
Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol & David Schiller

Essential Oil Spotlight: Myrrh

Myrrh essential oil is steam-distilled from the gum/resin of the Commiphora myrrha tree. Historically, myrrh has been used as an incense in religious rituals, in embalming, and to help with cancer, leprosy, and syphilis.

The warm, balsamic, and earthy aroma of myrrh promotes awareness and is uplifting. Myrrh is known to have an effect on the hormone, immune, and nervous systems as well as supporting the skin.

Myrrh is highly regarded for its anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antitumor, astringent, and tonic properties. Myrrh has commonly been used to help with cancer, chapped/cracked skin, congestion, dysentery, gum disease, Hashimoto’s disease, hepatitis, hyperthyroidism, infection, liver cirrhosis, skin ulcers, stretch marks, ulcers (duodenal), and weeping wounds.

Other possible uses for myrrh include appetite (increase), asthma, athlete’s foot, candida, catarrh (mucus), coughs, eczema, digestion, dyspepsia (impaired digestion), flatulence (gas), fungal infection, gingivitis, hemorrhoids, mouth ulcers, decongesting the prostate gland, ringworm, sore throats, skin conditions (chapped, cracked, and inflamed), wounds, and wrinkles.

It may also help support the body when dealing with bronchitis, diarrhea, thrush, vaginal thrush, and viral hepatitis.

Applications of Myrrh Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Myrrh essential oil is safe to use without dilution, but it can also be diluted as needed. Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale myrrh essential oil directly. The aroma of myrrh promotes awareness and is uplifting.
Internal Application: Myrrh essential oil can be taken internally in capsules. You can also place 1–2 drops of myrrh under the tongue, dilute in 1 tsp. (5 ml) of honey, or add to 1/2 cup (125 ml) of a beverage (such as non-dairy milk).

5 Ways to Use Myrrh Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
This diffuser blend of myrrh, rose, and lemon can help calm anxiety and soothe heated emotions:

2. Add to Lotion or Cream
Myrrh is known for aiding the skin and is often used to reduce wrinkles, help cracked, chapped, or inflamed skin, and aid the body with healing wounds. It is also beneficial to the respiratory system and may help with coughs, congestion, sore throats, mucus, and inflammation. Try adding myrrh to this Coconut Oil Soothing Balm (for wounds), Antiwrinkle Cream, Winter Salve, Chest Salve, or Simply Luxurious Moisturizing Lotion. You can also use one of the following blends (feel free to double or triple these blends as needed for your recipe):

Respiratory Aid:
6 drops myrrh
4 drops eucalyptus
2 drops thyme
Skin Repair:
5 drops myrrh
3 drops frankincense
2 drops lavender

3. Use in a Roll-on
Myrrh can also be used in a roll-on blend for easy application to wounds, chapped, cracked, or inflamed skin, or on the face as a moisturizer. Here is a good recipe that can work for any of these issues:

Skin Repair Roll-on:
5 drops myrrh (3 drops for children)
3 drops frankincense (2 drops for children)
2 drops lavender (1 drop for children)
2 tsp. (10 ml) jojoba oil
(Original recipe is 5% dilution; children’s recipe is 3% dilution)
Add all ingredients to a 1/3 oz. roll-on bottle.

4. Add to a Bath
Myrrh can also aid the skin, hormone, immune, and nervous systems when added to bathwater. Try mixing 3–5 drops myrrh with 1/4 cup (60 g) epsom salt, or add to a bath bomb.
-Mix with epsom salt, and add to the bathtub as it fills with water. You can also make bath bombs and add 5–10 drops myrrh and 10–15 drops frankincense for a really luxurious bath!

5. Add to Your Oral Care
Though you don’t often see myrrh used in toothpaste or mouthwash, myrrh essential oil is actually a great oil to use in oral care. It is said to help with sore throat, mouth ulcers, gingivitis, gum disease, and wounds. Try adding myrrh to your toothpaste/tooth powder, or make this simple mouthwash to help promote a healthy mouth and prevent gum disease:

Mouthwash:
1/2 tsp. (2 g) Himalayan sea salt
1 cup (240 ml) distilled warm water
10 drops myrrh essential oil
10 drops Natural Essential Oil Emulsifier
8 oz. Glass Bottle with Black Cap
Shot Glass
Stir salt into the warm water until dissolved. Let cool. Add essential oils and essential oil emulsifier to the 8 oz. glass bottle. When the salt water is cool, add it to the bottle, screw the lid on, and shake to combine. Shake before use. Use a shot glass to pour a little into your mouth, then swish and gargle for 30 seconds. Swallow or spit as desired. You can also soak your floss in the mixture before flossing.

To learn more about this amazing essential oil, see the book Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, pp. 94–95.
Aromatherapy Blends & Remedies by Franzesca Watson

Essential Oil Spotlight: Peppermint

Peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil is steam-distilled from the leaves of the plant. Its odor is minty, sharp, and intense.

Some properties of this oil include analgesic, antibacterial, anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, and invigorating.

For centuries, peppermint has been used to soothe digestive difficulties, freshen breath, and relieve colic, gas, headaches, heartburn, and indigestion.

Today, peppermint essential oil is commonly used for alertness, asthma, bacterial infections, chronic fatigue, cold sores, constipation, cooling, cramps/charley horses, dysmenorrhea, fever, flu (influenza), halitosis, headaches, heartburn, herpes simplex, hot flashes, hypothyroidism, indigestion, itching, lactation (decrease milk production), migraines, motion sickness, muscle fatigue, nausea, osteoporosis, sinusitis, throat infection, varicose veins, vomiting, and several other health conditions.

The body systems affected by peppermint essential oil include the Digestive System, Muscles and Bones, Nervous and Respiratory Systems, and Skin.

Research has shown that peppermint essential oil has helped increase endurance during exercise, decreased effects of gamma radiation exposure, reduced pain from headaches, reduced symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, enhanced memory, reduced the intensity of nausea in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, shown antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral properties in various tests (one test showed peppermint essential oil inhibiting resistant strains of Staphylococcus, E. Coli, Salmonella, and Helicobacter pylori), aided digestion by reducing constipation and increasing bowel movement, relieved pain and symptoms of indigestion, and prevented seizures in mice.

Research being conducted on peppermint continues to show new possible uses and therapeutic benefits that peppermint may possess. To learn more about a number of these research studies, including summaries and sources, please see the book Modern Essentials.

Applications of Peppermint Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Peppermint essential oil can be used neat (with no dilution), or it can be diluted 1:1 (1 drop essential oil to 1 drop carrier oil) for children and those with sensitive skin. Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma of peppermint essential oil directly. The aroma of peppermint is purifying and stimulating to the conscious mind and may aid with memory and mental performance. It is cooling and may help reduce fevers.
Internal Application: Peppermint essential oil can be taken internally. Try placing a drop or two under the tongue, taking it in a capsule or in a beverage, or using it as a flavoring in cooking.
Safey Note: Repeated use of peppermint essential oil can possibly result in contact sensitization. Use this oil with caution if dealing with high blood pressure or if pregnant.

5 Ways to Use Peppermint Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Here are a few great diffuser blends to help you get energized and focused:

2. Use in a Massage Oil
Peppermint is really great at helping to relax muscles and relieve aches and pains. Here is a recipe for a Sore Muscles Salve. You can also try one of the following massage recipes:

Rejuvenating
Massage Blend:

5 drops bergamot
5 drops lemon
3 drops peppermint
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil
Fatigue Relief
Massage Blend:

6 drops peppermint
5 drops rosemary
4 drops grapefruit
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil
Sore Muscles
Massage Blend:

4 drops ylang ylang
4 drops peppermint
3 drops thyme
3 drops ginger
1 drop lemon
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil

3. Roll on for a quick energy boost or digestive support.
Peppermint essential oil is great at increasing energy, alertness, and stamina. When you start to feel sluggish during the day and need a little pick-me-up, try rubbing this roll-on on your wrists, neck, or bottoms of your feet. You could also use the Rejuvenating or Fatigue Relief Massage Blend recipes above in a roll-on if you prefer (make sure to halve the recipe for daily use).

Pick Me Up Roll-on:
5 drops lavender (2 drops for daily use)
4 drops peppermint (2 drops for daily use)
3 drops grapefruit (1 drop for daily use)
3 drops lemongrass (1 drop for daily use)
1 tsp. (5 ml) carrier oil like Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil
Add oils to a 5 ml roll-on bottle, or double the recipe if using a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the bottle the rest of the way with a carrier oil. If you plan on using this roll-on on a daily basis, use the drops suggested for daily use, then fill the rest of the roll-on bottle with a carrier oil.

Peppermint oil is also known for supporting the digestive system and can help with constipation, diarrhea, indigestion, irritable bowel system, nausea, vomiting, and gastric ulcers, among other digestive issues. Try rubbing this roll-on blend over your stomach when your digestive system needs a little help.

Digestive Support Roll-on:
2 drops ginger
4 drops peppermint
5 drops lavender (2 drops for children)
5 drops lemon (1 drop for children)
4 drops fennel (1 drop for children)
1 tsp. (5 ml) carrier oil like Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil
Add oils to a 5 ml roll-on bottle, or double the recipe if using a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the bottle the rest of the way with a carrier oil.

4. Cool Your Body
Peppermint is a cooling oil and can help you cool off your body when you get too hot. Here are a few ways you can use peppermint oil to cool off:

  • If you live in a hot climate, these Frozen Eucalyptus Mint Towels may be a lifesaver for you! They are also great for using while you are outside doing yard work or watching your kids at the park.
  • Add a drop of peppermint oil to your water on a hot day. This is a great idea for hiking trips or occasions when you are outside all day.
  • Try a cooling bath using peppermint essential oil. (See recipe below.)
Cooling Bath Salts:
1–2 drops peppermint essential oil
1/4 cup (60 g) Epsom Salt
Mix ingredients together. Add bath salts to the bathtub as it fills up with warm or cool water.

5. Add to Cooking Recipes
Peppermint essential oil can be added to any of your favorite cooking recipes. Just use 1 drop of peppermint oil for every 1 tsp. of dried peppermint leaves or 1 Tbsp. fresh peppermint leaves. Peppermint essential oil can also replace peppermint extract (although you’ll use significantly less). Just add a drop, mix in, taste, and then add more if needed. These are a few of our recipes that include peppermint essential oil:

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, pp. 102–103.

Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol & David Schiller

Essential Oil Spotlight: Cardamom

Cardamom essential oil (Elettaria cardamomum) is steam-distilled from the seeds of the plant. It has a sweet, spicy, balsamic scent with floral undertones.

It has antibacterial, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, decongestant, diuretic, expectorant, stomachic, and tonic properties.

Anciently, cardamom was used for epilepsy, spasms, paralysis, rheumatism, cardiac disorders, all intestinal illnesses, pulmonary disease, fever, and digestive and urinary complaints. It is said to be able to neutralize the lingering odor of garlic.

If you are acquainted with Indian food, you may associate the flavor and smell of this oil with sweet Indian dishes such as rice pudding, as the cardamom spice is a common ingredient in this dish and gives it a cool, minty aroma and taste. It may be that rice pudding is often served at the end of the meal because of cardamom’s ability to neutralize lingering odors that cause halitosis.

Today cardamom is commonly used for coughs, digestive support, headaches, inflammation, muscle aches, nausea, and respiratory ailments. Cardamom may also help with appetite loss, bronchitis, colic, debility, dyspepsia, flatulence, halitosis, mental fatigue, heartburn, sciatica, ulcers, and vomiting. It may also be beneficial for menstrual periods, menopause, and nervous indigestion.

Cardamom is most known for supporting the digestive and respiratory systems of the body.

Applications of Cardamom Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Cardamom essential oil is safe to use without dilution, but it can also be diluted as needed. Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale cardamom essential oil directly. The aroma of cardamom is uplifting, refreshing, and invigorating. It may be beneficial for clearing confusion.
Internal Application: Cardamom essential oil can be taken internally and is often used as a flavoring in cooking. Put 1–2 drops of cardamom oil under the tongue or in a beverage. It can also be taken in capsules.

5 Ways to Use Cardamom Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Try these blends in your diffuser to increase your mental alertness, open your airways, and enjoy the scent of autumn leaves:

2. Use in Roll-on Blends

Cardamom essential oil is helpful to the respiratory and digestive systems. It can also help relieve a headache. Rub the respiratory blends (below) on the chest, throat, back, and/or sinuses to help open airways and clear coughs. Rub the digestive blends on the abdomen to help reduce flatulence, bloating, belching, hiccups, and heartburn. Cardamom is a safe essential oil to use with children, so it is a great choice over peppermint to open their little airways and support their digestive systems.

Respiratory Support (6+ years):
5 drops eucalyptus
5 drops peppermint
5 drops lemon
3 drops cardamom
2 drops rosemary
2 drops melaleuca
(20% dilution in a 5 ml roll-on or
10% dilution in a 10 ml roll-on)
Little Lungs Respiratory Support (Children):
1 drop cardamom
1 drop frankincense
(2% dilution in a 5 ml roll-on or
1% dilution in a 10 ml roll-on)
Digestive Support (6+ years):
5 drops cardamom
3 drops ginger
3 drops peppermint
(10% dilution in a 5 ml roll-on or
5% dilution in a 10 ml roll-on)
Tiny Tummies Digestive Support (Children):
1 drop cardamom
1 drop orange
1 drop fennel
(3% dilution in a 5 ml roll-on or
1.5% dilution in a 10 ml roll-on)
Headaches:
4 drops peppermint
3 drops cardamom
3 drops rosemary
(10% dilution in a 5 ml roll-on or
5% dilution in a 10 ml roll-on)

Add oils to a 5 ml roll-on bottle or 10 ml roll-on bottle depending on desired dilution percentage. Fill the bottle the rest of the way with a carrier oil. Common carrier oils for use in a roll-on bottle include Fractionated Coconut OilSweet Almond Oil, and Jojoba Oil.

3. Use in a Bath or Shower:

Cardamom essential oil is excellent as a bath oil. Combine one of the following oil blends with 1/4–1/2 cup (60–120 g) epsom salt, and evenly disperse throughout the tub. Alternatively, you can add these essential oil combinations to these bath bombs.

Muscle Aches:
2 drops cardamom
1 drop peppermint
1 drop clove
1 drop copaiba
Congestion Bomb:
2 drops eucalyptus
2 drops peppermint
2 drops cardamom
2 drops Douglas fir (or another fir oil)

If you prefer taking showers, try adding the Congestion Bomb blend or cardamom essential oil to these shower disks. The steam from the shower and the cardamom essential oil can be beneficial to clearing congestion.

4. Use in Breath Mints

Cardamom is beneficial in helping halitosis (bad breath) and is said to be able to neutralize the odor of garlic. Try adding cardamom essential oil to homemade breath mints, or use in a breath spray.

5. Add to Cooking Recipes

Cardamom essential oil is often used in Indian cooking, but it is great to add to any of your favorite recipes. It pairs well with chocolate, rice, honey, coconut oil, spices like cinnamon and clove, and works in both savory and sweet dishes. This oil can taste strong, so start with a toothpick and add more to taste. Here are some of our recipes that use cardamom essential oil:

Sources: Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, p. 45.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Siberian Fir

Siberian fir (Abies sibirica) essential oil is steam-distilled from the needles and twigs of the tree. It has a fresh, woody, earthy, sweet scent.

Some properties of this oil include analgesic, antiarthritic, anticatarrhal, antiseptic (pulmonary), expectorant, and stimulant.

Siberian fir is found throughout the cold taiga forest in northern Eurasia and North America. Though highly regarded for its fragrance, the fir tree has been prized through the ages for its medicinal virtues in regards to respiratory complaints, fever, and muscular and rheumatic pain.

Fir creates the symbolic effect of an umbrella protecting the earth and bringing energy in from the universe. At night the animals in the wild lie down under the tree for the protection, recharging, and rejuvenation it brings them.

Today, Siberian fir essential oil is commonly used for bronchitis, bursitis, cartilage inflammation, cleaning, emotional balance, energizing, frozen shoulder, furniture polish, massage (soothing), muscle fatigue, muscle pain, overexercised muscles, relaxing, and sprains. Fir may also be beneficial for reducing aches/pains from colds and the flu, fighting airborne germs/bacteria, arthritis, asthma, supporting the blood, bronchial obstructions, coughs, fevers, oxygenating the cells, rheumatism, sinusitis, and urinary tract infections.

Siberian fir essential oil affects the respiratory system.

Applications of Siberian Fir Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Siberian fir essential oil can be used neat (with no dilution). Dilute with carrier oil for children or those with sensitive skin. Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma of Siberian fir essential oil directly. The aroma of Siberian fir creates a feeling of grounding, anchoring, and empowerment. It can stimulate the mind while allowing the body to relax.
Internal Application: Siberian fir essential oil can be taken internally via capsule or beverage. Try diluting 1 drop of Siberian fir essential oil in 1 tsp. (5 ml) honey or 4 oz. (125 ml) of beverage (such as non-dairy milk). It is not to be used for children under 6 years of age and should be used with caution and in greater dilution for children over 6 years of age.
Safey Note: This oil can irritate sensitive skin.

5 Ways to Use Siberian Fir Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Siberian fir is both stimulating and relaxing, which can leave the body feeling refreshed and grounded. Try these blends in your diffuser when you feel the need to be a little more grounded, energized, or relaxed:

2. Add to a Body Salve
Due to its anticatarrhal and expectorant properties, Siberian fir is great for respiratory issues. Its analgesic and antiarthritic properties make it a good oil to use on muscles and joints. Siberian fir is also helpful for cuts and scrapes due to its analgesic and antiseptic properties. Try adding Siberian fir essential oil to the following coconut oil salve, or use one of the blends below.

Coconut Oil Salve

  • Servings: Yield=1/4 cup (60 ml)
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. Melt the beeswax in a double boiler.
  2. Once the beeswax is melted, add the coconut oil. Remove from heat once melted. Allow to cool.
  3. When cool, add the essential oil, and use a hand blender to combine. Blend on high for several seconds until well incorporated and creamy.
  4. Spoon the cooled cream into sealable glass containers. The salve is ready to use.
  5. If using for cuts and scrapes, avoid contaminating the cream with stray bacteria—try not to touch it directly with your hands. Instead, use a cotton swab or clean tissue to apply it to a wound.

Essential Oil Blends:

Muscles:
6 drops Siberian fir
4 drops rosemary
4 drops black pepper
Respiratory:
6 drops Siberian fir
4 drops eucalyptus
3 drops peppermint
2 drops sandalwood
Cuts and Scrapes:
5 drops Siberian fir
5 drops melaleuca
5 drops frankincense
5 drops lavender

3. Use in Furniture Polish
Siberian fir is a great oil to add to natural furniture polish that can be used for wood, leather, stainless steel, and other metals. It polishes woods and metals, softens leather, removes sticky residue, and more.

Furniture Polish

  • Servings: Yield=2 Tbsp. (30 ml)
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. Add all ingredients to the spray bottle. Shake to combine.
  2. To use, shake and spray on rag, then rub onto any wood, metal, or leather surface needing polishing.

4. Add to Deodorant, Perfume, or Room Spray

Siberian fir smells so good and its scent is so grounding; it is a great oil to add to deodorant, perfume, or a room spray. Simply add one of the following blends to this soft deodorant recipe, this hard deodorant recipe, this room spray recipe, or this perfume recipe.

Oriental Nights:
7 drops frankincense
5 drops Siberian fir
3 drops orange
Rejuvenate Yourself:
5 drops Siberian fir
5 drops lavender
Sweet Sunrise
7 drops Siberian fir
4 drops rosemary
3 drops bergamot

5. Open Airways with a Steam Facial Bath
Because it contains expectorant and anticatarral properties, Siberian fir is great to use for respiratory issues, especially a stuffy nose. Try this recipe for a steam facial bath to help open your airways:

Open Airways:
5 drops Siberian fir
5 drops eucalyptus
5 drops melaleuca
Mix essential oils in a sample bottle, and then add 1 drop (2–3 bottle taps) to a bowl full of steaming hot water. Put a towel over your head to trap the steam, and lean over the bowl (don’t let your face touch the hot water). Breathe deeply for several minutes. Repeat every hour as needed over the course of a day or two to help relieve sinus congestion.

Source:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, p. 112.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Blue Tansy

Blue tansy (Tanacetum annuum) essential oil is steam-distilled from the leaves and flowers of the plant. It has a camphoraceous, sweet, and herbaceous scent.

Some properties of this oil include analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antihistamine, hypotensive, hormone-like, and nervine.

Anciently, tansy was used to help heal wounds, as a diuretic, and for dealing with kidney issues.

Today, blue tansy essential oil is commonly used for anxiety, calming, and wounds. Blue tansy may also help raise blood pressure, relieve itching, reduce pain, and sedate the nerves.

Blue tansy essential oil affects the nervous system.

Applications of Blue Tansy Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Blue tansy essential oil can be used neat (with no dilution), but it is best diluted, especially when used on children or those with sensitive skin. Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern. Note: The deep blue color of blue tansy can temporarily color your skin if used undiluted.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma of blue tansy essential oil directly. The aroma of blue tansy is uplifting, refreshing, and calming to a troubled mind. It may also help instill confidence and enthusiasm.
Internal Application: Blue tansy essential oil should not be taken orally.
Safety Note: Consult a physician before using if taking medications. Avoid using if you are pregnant or have high blood pressure.

5 Ways to Use Blue Tansy Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Try diffusing blue tansy alone or with the following blend for an uplifting and calming scent:

2. Natural Coloring/Fragrance
Blue tansy essential oil has a deep blue color due to the chemical chamazulene, a result from the distillation process. Because blue tansy essential oil contains chamazulene, it is a natural way to provide a blue color to your DIY products. Experimental research is indicating that this same chemical, chamazulene, could prove beneficial to the skin as well.

Try using blue tansy in place of soap dye in this DIY Kid’s Soap recipe. Consider using a few drops of blue tansy essential oil in a combination with lavender and/or Roman chamomile essential oil.

Try adding a few drops of blue tansy to this Sore Muscle Salve or this Coconut Oil Soothing Balm to not only give it a soothing color, but also increase the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of the final product.

3. Oil Cleansing Roll-On for Acne or Inflamed Skin
Oil cleansing, though not intuitive, can be beneficial for oily or acne-prone skin. Conventional skin cleansers tend to strip away the skin’s natural oil and sebum, which leads the skin to produce more. This creates a vicious cycle of more sebum production, which can lead to more acne. The oil cleansing method does the opposite—it adds oil, which tells the skin to slow sebum production and leads to less oily skin and acne. The essential oils listed in this blend are anti-inflammatory oils, so this roll-on blend works great on acne or other inflamed skin.

Acne Oil Cleanser Roll-On:
1 drop blue tansy
2 drops lavender
3 drops melaleuca
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) Sweet Almond Oil, Jojoba Oil, or Grape Seed Oil
Add oils to a 1 oz. roll-on bottle. Fill the bottle the rest of the way with a carrier oil.
To use, roll on the face, then use the fingers to massage into the skin. Use a warm, wet washcloth to remove the excess oil, and pat dry.

4. Soothing Massage
Blue tansy essential oil is commonly used to calm the mind and body. What better way to relax and calm down than with a massage? Here are a couple massage blends to get you started:

Calm & Relaxing:
5 drops tangerine
5 drops orange
3 drops ylang ylang or bergamot
1 drops patchouli
1 drop blue tansy
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) carrier oil*
Muscle Aches Be Gone:
5 drops wintergreen
5 drops cypress
2 drops blue tansy
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) carrier oil*
*Common carrier oils to use for massage include Fractionated Coconut OilCoconut OilSweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil.

5. Bath
You can also use blue tansy in a bath for a relaxing experience. Try the following bath blend, or add a drop or two of blue tansy essential oil to bath bombs.

Calming Blue Waters:
7 drops lavender
1–2 drops blue tansy
1/4–1/2 cup (60–120 g) Epsom Salt
Note: Despite the name, this won’t actually affect your bathwater color since the blue tansy oil is highly diluted.

Source:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, p. 44.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Copaiba

Copaiba (Copaifera officinalis, C. reticulata, C. coriacea, C. langdorffii) essential oil is steam-distilled from oleoresin, a substance made up of resin and essential oils. It has a soft, sweet, balsamic odor.

Some properties of this oil include analgesic, powerful anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiseptic, antioxidant, and stimulant for the circulatory and pulmonary systems.

The oleoresin has traditionally been used for inflammation (internal and external), skin disorders, respiratory problems (including bronchitis and sinusitis), and urinary tract problems (including cystitis and bladder/kidney infections). It has also been used for bleeding, gonorrhea, hemorrhages, herpes, incontinence, insect bites, pain, pleurisy, sore throats, stomach ulcers, syphilis, tetanus, tonsillitis, tuberculosis, and tumors.

Today, copaiba essential oil is commonly used for acne, antioxidant, anxiety, inflammation, muscle aches, and pain. Copaiba may also help with colds, constipation, diarrhea, dyspepsia, edema, flatulence, flu, hemorrhoids, nervous exhaustion, piles, poor circulation, stiffness, and wounds.

The body systems affected by copaiba essential oil include the cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems, muscles and bones, emotional balance, and skin.

Applications of Copaiba Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Copaiba essential oil can be used neat (with no dilution). Dilute with carrier oil for children or those with sensitive skin. Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma directly. The aroma of copaiba helps to elevate the mood and lift depression. It also helps to combat nervous tension, stress problems, and anxiety.
Internal Application: Copaiba essential oil can be taken internally via capsule or beverage. Try diluting 1 drop of copaiba essential oil in 1 tsp. (5 ml) honey or 4 oz. (125 ml) of beverage (such as non-dairy milk). It is not to be used for children under 6 years of age and should be used with caution and in greater dilution for children over 6 years of age.
Safey Note: Repeated use may result in contact sensitization. It may irritate sensitive skin in some individuals.

5 Ways to Use Copaiba Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Try diffusing these blends to elevate your mood, lift depression, or combat nervous tension, stress, or anxiety.

2. Massage Blends:
Copaiba essential oil supports the respiratory and nervous systems, muscles and bones, and the skin. It also has the ability to magnify the effects of other essential oils. Because of these facts, copaiba essential oil is good to use in massage blends. You can simply add 1–2 drops of copaiba essential oil to any of your favorite essential oil massage recipes. Or you can try one of the following:

Calming Massage:
5 drops chamomile
5 drops lavender
5 drops bergamot
2 drops copaiba
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil*
Sore Muscles Massage:
5 drops peppermint
5 drops lemongrass
4 drops marjoram
2 drops copaiba
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil*

*Common carrier oils for use in massage include Fractionated Coconut Oil, Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, and Jojoba Oil.

3. Skin/Facial Care:
Copaiba has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which makes it ideal to use on the skin, especially the face—no matter your age or whether you are dealing with acne or wrinkles. Try this cream on your skin or face:

Facial Cream

  • Servings: Yield=2 oz.
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. In a double boiler (or a heat-proof glass measuring cup placed in a saucepan of water), melt the beeswax pellets over medium heat.
  2. Once melted, reduce the heat to low, and add coconut oil. Stir until melted again.
  3. Add jojoba oil or almond oil and vitamin E oil. Remove from heat, and stir until all combined.
  4. Allow to cool for 10 minutes.
  5. Stir in essential oils.
  6. If you’d like a whipped consistency, blend with a hand mixer or blender when completely cool.
  7. Pour into lotion bottles or salve jars.
  8. To use, rub facial cream on face after removing makeup.

4. Muscle Pains Bath
Soaking in a warm bath is a great way to help sore muscles relax; adding epsom salt provides magnesium that helps relax muscles and reduce lactic acid, and the essential oils help the muscles rebuild as well as reduce pain. Next time your muscles hurt, try adding this blend to your bathwater:

Soothing Muscle Pains:
4 drops peppermint
3 drops marjoram
3 drops copaiba
1 drop black pepper
1/2 cup (120 g) Epsom Salt
Mix together, and add to bathwater as the tub is filling up. Soak for at least 15–20 minutes.

3. Roll-on Blends
Copaiba essential oil has the ability to enhance the effects of other essential oils. It is anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, so it is great to use for skin care (especially troubled skin or acne) or wound care. It also helps reduce stress and anxiety, which is beneficial in getting a good night’s rest. Copiaba’s ability to help reduce pain and inflammation make it ideal for use on headaches or muscle pain. Try making one of the roll-ons below and take advantage of the benefits of copaiba essential oil while on the go.

Skin Serum:
7 drops copaiba (4 drops for daily use)
5 drops lavender (3 drops for daily use)
5 drops frankincense (3 drops for daily use)
2 tsp. (10 ml) Jojoba Oil or Fractionated Coconut Oil (This recipe has an 8.5% dilution ratio. Follow the instructions for daily use if you plan on using it every day.)
Sweet Dreams Roll-on:
4 drops lavender (1–2 drops for children)
4 drops cedarwood (1–2 drops for children)
4 drops copaiba (1–2 drops for children
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil* (This recipe has a 6% dilution ratio. Adjust the recipe to 1 drop for children under 12 months and 2 drops for children 1–5 years old.)
Headache or Muscle Relief Roll-on:
15 drops peppermint (5 drops for daily use)
15 drops lavender (5 drops for daily use)
5 drops marjoram (3 drops for daily use)
3 drops copaiba (1 drop for daily use)
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil* (This recipe has a 19% dilution. It’s formulated for short-term use. If you need to use it daily, follow the instructions for daily use.)
Add oils to a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the bottle the rest of the way with a carrier oil.

*Common carrier oils for use in a roll-on bottle include Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, and Jojoba Oil.

Source:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, p. 55.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Neroli

Neroli (Citrus aurantium) essential oil is extracted from flowers of the bitter orange tree. Its scent is somewhat floral with citrus undertones. It smells sweet, delicate, and slightly bitter at the same time.

The orange flower was named after the princess Anne-Marie, countess of Neroli, who used it to perfume her bath water. It is now considered one of the finest perfumery ingredients and is particularly important in eau-de-cologne toilet water. The flowers were once popularly used in bridal bouquets to symbolize innocence and fertility.

Some properties of this oil include antibacterial, antidepressant, anti-infectious, antiparasitic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, aphrodisiac, deodorant, sedative, and tonic.

Historically, neroli has been regarded by the Egyptian people for its great attributes of healing the mind, body, and spirit. It brings everything into the focus of one and at the moment.

Today, neroli essential oil is commonly used for anxiety, emotional balance, relaxing, sensitive skin, and stress. It may also support the digestive system and may help inhibit bacterial infections, parasites, and viruses. Other possible uses include insomnia, menopause, PMS, stress-related conditions, and skin conditions.

The body systems affected by neroli essential oil include the digestive system and skin.

Applications of Neroli Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Neroli essential oil can be used neat (with no dilution). Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma directly. The aroma of neroli has some powerfully soothing psychological effects. It is calming and relaxing to the body and spirit. It may also help to strengthen and stabilize the emotions and bring relief to seemingly hopeless situations. It encourages confidence, courage, joy, peace, and sensuality.
Internal Application: Neroli essential oil can be taken internally. Try diluting 1 drop of neroli essential oil in 1 tsp. (5 ml) honey or 4 oz. (125 ml) of beverage (such as non-dairy milk). It is not to be used for children under 6 years of age and should be used with caution and in greater dilution for children over 6 years of age.
Safety Note: Consult with a physician before using if pregnant or being treated for a medical condition.

5 Ways to Use Neroli Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Here are a few great diffuser blends to help you calm down when stressed, anxious, or needing to sleep:

2. Use in a Massage Oil
Neroli essential oil is very calming to the body and mind. When you get feeling too stressed or anxious, try massaging one of these blends into your tense muscles.

Relaxing Massage Blend:
3 drops neroli
3 drops petitgrain
3 drops marjoram
1 drop spikenard
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) carrier oil
Calming
Massage Blend:

6 drops petitgrain
5 drops orange
4 drops neroli
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) carrier oil

Common carrier oils to use for massage include Fractionated Coconut Oil, Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil.

3. Roll on for quick help in calming down or soothing digestive pains.
Stress and anxiety follow us wherever we go, so making this Stress Relief Roll-on for on-the-go use can help during those difficult times. Neroli is also beneficial for those who suffer from insomnia or sleep issues, as it helps to relax the mind and calm any emotions that prohibit sleep. Try the Sleep Restfully Roll-on when you have restless nights. Aside from its calming and relaxing properties, neroli is also helpful for the digestive system and may help inhibit bacteria, infections, parasites, and viruses. If you are experiencing digestive pains, chronic diarrhea, colic, or intestinal spasms, try rolling the Digestive Support blend on your abdomen.

Stress Relief Roll-on:
3 drops bergamot
2 drops orange
2 drops lavender
2 drops neroli
1 drops lemongrass
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil*
Sleep Restfully Roll-on:
4 drops orange
3 drops cedarwood
3 drops neroli
2 drops Roman chamomile
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil*
Digestive Support Roll-on:
5 drops neroli
4 drops orange
2 drops peppermint
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil*
Add oils to a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the bottle the rest of the way with a carrier oil.

Note: These recipes are formulated for 5–6% dilution in a 10 ml roll-on bottle (perfect for daily use if needed). For a stronger dilution, simply cut the amount of carrier oil in half, or use a 5 ml roll-on bottle.

*Common carrier oils for use in a roll-on bottle include Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, and Jojoba Oil.

4. Add to a Relaxing Bath
Neroli calms and slows the mind and is useful for insomnia, hysteria, and all states of anxiety and depression. Combine one of the following oil blends with 1/4–1/2 cup (60–120 g) epsom salt, and evenly disperse throughout the tub. Alternatively, you can add these essential oil combinations to these bath bombs. These blends can also be used in a diffuser, roll-on, or linen spray.

Calming Peace:
5 drops neroli
3 drops Roman chamomile
2 drops petitgrain
Insomnia & Sleep:
4 drops neroli
2 drops juniper berry
2 drops chamomile
Nervous Tension:
2 drops bergamot
2 drops marjoram
1 drop neroli
2 drops sandalwood

5. Create a Peaceful Atmosphere for Romance or Meditation
The reputed aphrodisiac quality of neroli stems from its ability to calm any nervous apprehension that may be felt before a sexual encounter. Neroli can be a means of overcoming sexual difficulties that rise from anxiety or tension. The traditional use of orange blossom in bridal wreaths arose from this property of neroli, though it has long been forgotten.
Try diffusing this blend or use it in a linen spray:

Peaceful Romance:
5 drops neroli
1 drop sandalwood

Neroli also helps in creating a peaceful atmosphere when it is used in meditation. Diffuse neroli essential oil (or the Peaceful Romance blend above), and rub a drop of the oil over the heart to achieve a calm heart and relaxed mind.

5. Nourish Your Skin
Neroli is beneficial for all skin types, especially if there is dryness, redness, or irritation. Neroli stimulates the regeneration of new cells and the elimination of old ones, improving skin’s elasticity. It is generally helpful for all kinds of skin problems such as thread veins, scarring, and stretch marks. Try using the blend below as a facial cream or skin cream to help nourish your skin.

Improved Skin:
3 drops neroli
2 drops frankincense
2 drops Roman chamomile
1–2 tsp. (4–8 g) Coconut Oil

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, p. 96.
Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol & David Schiller
Aromatherapy: An A–Z by Patricia Davis
Aromatherapy Blends & Remedies by Franzesca Watson