Essential Oil Spotlight: Neroli

Neroli (Citrus aurantium) essential oil is extracted from flowers of the bitter orange tree. Its scent is somewhat floral with citrus undertones. It smells sweet, delicate, and slightly bitter at the same time.

The orange flower was named after the princess Anne-Marie, countess of Neroli, who used it to perfume her bath water. It is now considered one of the finest perfumery ingredients and is particularly important in eau-de-cologne toilet water. The flowers were once popularly used in bridal bouquets to symbolize innocence and fertility.

Some properties of this oil include antibacterial, antidepressant, anti-infectious, antiparasitic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, aphrodisiac, deodorant, sedative, and tonic.

Historically, neroli has been regarded by the Egyptian people for its great attributes of healing the mind, body, and spirit. It brings everything into the focus of one and at the moment.

Today, neroli essential oil is commonly used for anxiety, emotional balance, relaxing, sensitive skin, and stress. It may also support the digestive system and may help inhibit bacterial infections, parasites, and viruses. Other possible uses include insomnia, menopause, PMS, stress-related conditions, and skin conditions.

The body systems affected by neroli essential oil include the digestive system and skin.

Applications of Neroli Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Neroli essential oil can be used neat (with no dilution). Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma directly. The aroma of neroli has some powerfully soothing psychological effects. It is calming and relaxing to the body and spirit. It may also help to strengthen and stabilize the emotions and bring relief to seemingly hopeless situations. It encourages confidence, courage, joy, peace, and sensuality.
Internal Application: Neroli essential oil can be taken internally. Try diluting 1 drop of neroli essential oil in 1 tsp. (5 ml) honey or 4 oz. (125 ml) of beverage (such as non-dairy milk). It is not to be used for children under 6 years of age and should be used with caution and in greater dilution for children over 6 years of age.
Safety Note: Consult with a physician before using if pregnant or being treated for a medical condition.

5 Ways to Use Neroli Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Here are a few great diffuser blends to help you calm down when stressed, anxious, or needing to sleep:

2. Use in a Massage Oil
Neroli essential oil is very calming to the body and mind. When you get feeling too stressed or anxious, try massaging one of these blends into your tense muscles.

Relaxing Massage Blend:
3 drops neroli
3 drops petitgrain
3 drops marjoram
1 drop spikenard
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) carrier oil
Calming
Massage Blend:

6 drops petitgrain
5 drops orange
4 drops neroli
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) carrier oil

Common carrier oils to use for massage include Fractionated Coconut Oil, Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil.

3. Roll on for quick help in calming down or soothing digestive pains.
Stress and anxiety follow us wherever we go, so making this Stress Relief Roll-on for on-the-go use can help during those difficult times. Neroli is also beneficial for those who suffer from insomnia or sleep issues, as it helps to relax the mind and calm any emotions that prohibit sleep. Try the Sleep Restfully Roll-on when you have restless nights. Aside from its calming and relaxing properties, neroli is also helpful for the digestive system and may help inhibit bacteria, infections, parasites, and viruses. If you are experiencing digestive pains, chronic diarrhea, colic, or intestinal spasms, try rolling the Digestive Support blend on your abdomen.

Stress Relief Roll-on:
3 drops bergamot
2 drops orange
2 drops lavender
2 drops neroli
1 drops lemongrass
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil*
Sleep Restfully Roll-on:
4 drops orange
3 drops cedarwood
3 drops neroli
2 drops Roman chamomile
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil*
Digestive Support Roll-on:
5 drops neroli
4 drops orange
2 drops peppermint
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil*
Add oils to a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the bottle the rest of the way with a carrier oil.

Note: These recipes are formulated for 5–6% dilution in a 10 ml roll-on bottle (perfect for daily use if needed). For a stronger dilution, simply cut the amount of carrier oil in half, or use a 5 ml roll-on bottle.

*Common carrier oils for use in a roll-on bottle include Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, and Jojoba Oil.

4. Add to a Relaxing Bath
Neroli calms and slows the mind and is useful for insomnia, hysteria, and all states of anxiety and depression. Combine one of the following oil blends with 1/4–1/2 cup (60–120 g) epsom salt, and evenly disperse throughout the tub. Alternatively, you can add these essential oil combinations to these bath bombs. These blends can also be used in a diffuser, roll-on, or linen spray.

Calming Peace:
5 drops neroli
3 drops Roman chamomile
2 drops petitgrain
Insomnia & Sleep:
4 drops neroli
2 drops juniper berry
2 drops chamomile
Nervous Tension:
2 drops bergamot
2 drops marjoram
1 drop neroli
2 drops sandalwood

5. Create a Peaceful Atmosphere for Romance or Meditation
The reputed aphrodisiac quality of neroli stems from its ability to calm any nervous apprehension that may be felt before a sexual encounter. Neroli can be a means of overcoming sexual difficulties that rise from anxiety or tension. The traditional use of orange blossom in bridal wreaths arose from this property of neroli, though it has long been forgotten.
Try diffusing this blend or use it in a linen spray:

Peaceful Romance:
5 drops neroli
1 drop sandalwood

Neroli also helps in creating a peaceful atmosphere when it is used in meditation. Diffuse neroli essential oil (or the Peaceful Romance blend above), and rub a drop of the oil over the heart to achieve a calm heart and relaxed mind.

5. Nourish Your Skin
Neroli is beneficial for all skin types, especially if there is dryness, redness, or irritation. Neroli stimulates the regeneration of new cells and the elimination of old ones, improving skin’s elasticity. It is generally helpful for all kinds of skin problems such as thread veins, scarring, and stretch marks. Try using the blend below as a facial cream or skin cream to help nourish your skin.

Improved Skin:
3 drops neroli
2 drops frankincense
2 drops Roman chamomile
1–2 tsp. (4–8 g) Coconut Oil

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, p. 96.
Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol & David Schiller
Aromatherapy: An A–Z by Patricia Davis
Aromatherapy Blends & Remedies by Franzesca Watson

9th Edition of Modern Essentials + the New Handbook!

This year, along with the 9th Edition of Modern Essentials, we are also introducing the newest member of the Modern Essentials Family—the Modern Essentials Handbook!
As the name implies, the Modern Essentials Handbook is THE book that should be in the hands of every oil user, at home or on the go. And with an anticipated low introductory price, this book is an affordable option to gift to new essential oil users, as well as to have personal copies at home, at the office, in the car, at school, or everywhere that essential oils are used!
Features of the Modern Essentials Handbook include:

  • A beautifully redesigned introduction section that helps new (and old) users quickly and easily learn what essential oils are, where they come from, how they can be used, what tools are essential to use oils effectively, and how to use essential oils safely and effectively.

  • Beautiful new “Essential Essentials” oil highlight pages that feature additional information and images for some of the top oils and blends (helping new oil users know which oils and blends they should acquire to get started).

  • Convenient size that makes it easy to slip this book in a purse, bag, backpack, suitcase, or car so it can go anywhere! (The size of the Handbook is 6.75″ x 9″.)
  • Oil prompts note pages in the back of the book that allow users to keep their favorite oils and recipes handy.

  • All of the information users need to safely and effectively use pure, therapeutic-grade oils for hundreds of health conditions—physical, mental, and emotional.
  • A low price, making this very affordable—buy a case to give away to new users, or just have several copies on hand.
  • A beautiful new cover, with a unique texture and a stunning oil-drop pattern highlight that is visible when it catches the light.

All of these features really make the Modern Essentials Handbook the go-to book that everyone who uses, or is interested in, oils should have in their hands.

This new book complements our traditional Modern Essentials book (which we have given a new subtitle: “The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils”) very well.
While the Handbook is the “go-to” book, everyone should have a copy of the big Modern Essentials at home as a reference book for going deeper and learning more about essential oils as well as teaching others about the oils. Modern Essentials goes much more in depth on:

  • Application methods
  • Blending
  • Chemistry and chemical constituents
  • The historical use of essential oils and aromatic plants
  • How essential oils affect the body
  • Published scientific and medical research studies for single oils and conditions that support the therapeutic use of essential oils
  • Additional charts and illustrations
  • More detailed information and research supporting the use of ingredients found In essential oil–infused supplements and personal care products

The 9th Edition of Modern Essentials keeps all the features we know and love from the 8th Edition and has been updated with a beautiful new cover, 4 new oils, and additional personal care products.

Take advantage of the introductory prices and free shipping specials going on this week at AromaTools.com, and order these books today!

New Mini Tear Pads for Essential Oil Classes

With school back in session, it’s the perfect time to get ready to teach new essential oil classes. AromaTools has some new materials that are perfect for sending your attendees home with the important information from your class.
These mini tear pads are less expensive and less bulky than regular sized tear pads, which makes them easy to carry around and to hand out to interested people or class attendees. Here are a few class ideas that you can do with each mini tear pad:

Aromatherapy Mini Tear Pad

The Aromatherapy Mini Tear Pad is great for teaching the basics of using essential oils aromatically. It includes information on how aromatic use is beneficial to the body and ways to diffuse or inhale the aroma of an essential oil. Also included are some perfume blends and diffuser blends. Here are a few ideas for using this tear pad in your essential oil classes:

Topical Application Mini Tear Pad

The Topical Application Mini Tear Pad teaches the basics of using essential oils topically. It includes information about why topical application benefits the body and ways to use essential oils topically. On the back, you will find essential oil suggestions for massage oil and a couple bath blends.

Dilution Mini Tear Pad

The Dilution Mini Tear Pad goes hand-in-hand with the Topical Application Mini Tear Pad, or it can be used separately. When teaching about using essential oils topically, you’ll want to include information about how to properly dilute essential oils for daily use, short-term use, or use on young, sensitive, or elderly skin. This tear pad includes common carrier oils for dilution, suggests roll-on bottles as handy aids, and has a dilution chart showing how many drops of carrier oil to use.

Internal Application Mini Tear Pad

The Internal Application Mini Tear Pad teaches which oils can be used internally, why internal use of essential oils can be beneficial for the body, and how to use essential internally. It also includes a few simple recipes for using essential oils in food or drink.

Essential Oils & Cooking Mini Tear Pad

The EOs & Cooking Mini Tear Pad outlines the benefits for using essential oils in your cooking, and the back covers guidelines for substituting essential oils for zest, herbs, or spices commonly used in cooking recipes. This tear pad can be used on its own or along with the Internal Application Mini Tear Pad.

  • Essential Oil Class Ideas: This tear pad is often used for a Cooking with Essential Oils class. Just give a little background about essential oils and how they can enhance the flavor of a dish and provide additional health benefits. Then prepare a simple dish using essential oils and allow your guests to sample it. Click here for cooking recipes that use essential oils.
  • Essential Oil Refreshments: If you want to include essential oil refreshments at any class, it may be a good idea to include this tear pad on the refreshment table so that your attendees can learn how to cook with essential oils on their own.

Do you have any suggestions or ideas for using these mini tear pads? Comment below. We’d love to learn from you!

Just Add Oils to Your Back-to-School Tools (Including 7 Diffuser Blends)

Summer is almost over, and the school year is about to start. As you start gathering your pencils, notebooks, textbooks, and other school supplies, consider gathering some aromatherapy supplies as well. Essential oils can be very beneficial for students and teachers and can enhance the learning experience. In fact, studies have shown that essential oils can help increase memory, enhance concentration, promote calmness, boost energy, and fight bugs.
Even just smelling the scent of an essential oil can affect emotions and improve mental clarity. One study showed that “when essential oils are diffused while studying and smelled during a test, test scores may increase by as much as 50%. Different essential oils should be used for different tests, but the same essential oil should be used during the test as was used while studying for that particular test. The smell of the essential oil may help bring back the memory of what was studied.”

Modern Essentials lists the following oils to help with memory: rosemary, peppermint, frankincense, basil, clove, lemon, juniper berry, cedarwood, ginger, grapefruit, lime, bergamot, rose, dill, lavender, lemongrass, and petitgrain.

Want to give it a try? Here’s how: pick a single oil or an oil blend to inhale while you are studying for your test or attending class. You could even label the oil(s) you choose with a class subject. Every time you study that subject, diffuse those oils or place them in a nasal inhaler and periodically breathe in the scent as you study. During the test, pull out the nasal inhaler again and breathe the scent again when you need a little memory boost.
Nasal inhalers make it easy to take the scent of oils with you wherever you go. They even allow you to breathe in the scent without making others around you smell the oil as well. We’ve created 7 essential oil diffuser blends that can also be used in nasal inhalers. Simply drop the oils on the wick; then insert the wick into the inhaler, and push the base in to close it. Place the inhaler close to your nose, and inhale the aroma.

Each of the following diffuser blend recipes can be doubled and placed in a nasal inhaler:

Morning Sunshine:
2 drops orange
2 drops peppermint
2 drops lime
Calm Down:
4 drops lavender
2 drops Roman chamomile
2 drops cedarwood
Afternoon Energy Boost:
3 drops peppermint
2 drops rosemary
2 drops grapefruit
Anxiety Helper:
4 drops lavender
2 drops lemon
2 drops ylang ylang
Mental Clarity:
3 drops lemon
1 drop basil
1 drop rosemary
1 drop frankincense
Smarty Pants:
3 drops peppermint
2 drops basil
Study and Testing Time:
3 drops peppermint
3 drops rosemary
2 drops lemon

Another alternative to nasal inhalers are Whispi® diffusers. You can also make the above blends in a small bottle, then put 1–2 drops of the blend on aromatherapy jewelry. A key chain case is a great way to store and transport your oils—it even has a carabiner to attach to your backpack.

Want to learn more? We’ve put together several other posts on how essential oils can be useful at school. Follow the links below to see these helpful hints:
Backpack Essentials for Students
Backpack Essentials for Teachers
Back to School Tip #1: Stinky Locker?
Back to School Tip #2: School Lunch?
Back to School Tip #3: Multiple Choice?
Back to School Tip #4: First-Period Chemistry?
Better Focus Diffuser Blend

How do you use essential oils at school? What essential oil tools do you use to enhance learning? We’d love to hear your experiences!

Reducing Stress with Essential Oils

“Stress is the body’s response to difficult, pressured, or worrisome circumstances. Stress can cause both physical and emotional tension. Symptoms of stress include headaches, muscle soreness, fatigue, insomnia, nervousness, anxiety, and irritability.” (Modern Essentials, p. 341)

We all experience stress at some point in our lives. Some deal with stress almost constantly. And often times, little things can trigger a lot of stress. We live in a fast-paced environment that makes it difficult to slow down, take deep breaths, and calm our bodies—but this is what we need to do! Stress can be very harmful to our health, and it is important to learn how to deal with stress appropriately so it doesn’t control or ruin our lives.

Essential Oils for Stress:

According to Modern Essentials, the following oils may help reduce stress:
General Stress: lavender, Focus Blend, lemon, ylang ylang, bergamot, petitgrain, Joyful Blend, Restful Blend, grapefruit, Massage Blend, Roman chamomile, geranium, spikenard, Grounding Blend, frankincense, marjoram

Chemical Stress: lavender, rosemary, grapefruit, geranium, clary sage, lemon

Emotional Stress: Joyful Blend, clary sage, Reassuring Blend, bergamot, Comforting Blend, petitgrain, geranium, Roman chamomile, sandalwood

Environmental Stress: bergamot, cypress, geranium, cedarwood

Performance Stress: grapefruit, bergamot, ginger, rosemary

Physical Stress: Restful Blend, lavender, bergamot, geranium, marjoram, Roman chamomile, rosemary, thyme

Ways to Use Essential Oils to Reduce Stress

1. Aromatic Application
One of the best ways to get an essential oil quickly into our bodies for emotional balance is to inhale it. There are several ways to do this:

  • Inhale oil directly from the bottle.
  • Apply oil to hands, tissue, or nasal inhaler, and inhale.
  • Diffuse into the air with a diffuser.
  • Wear as perfume or cologne.

2. Topical Application
Most methods of topical application include relaxing your muscles as you apply the essential oil. This is especially helpful when dealing with stress because we tend to hold our stress in our muscles (i.e., tense shoulders, tight back, neck pain, etc.). Here are a few ways to apply essential oils topically for stress:

  • Add 5–10 drops of essential oil to 1 Tbsp. (15 ml) fractionated coconut oil, jojoba oil, or sweet almond oil, and massage on skin. Massage gently into tight muscles.
  • Add 1–2 drops to 1/4 cup (60 g) epsom salt, and dissolve in warm bathwater before bathing. Lavender essential oil is great for a relaxing bath!
  • Dilute oils as recommended, and apply 1–2 drops on neck, back, or bottoms of feet.

If you experience stress due to tiredness or insomnia, try this massage blend:
15 drops clary sage
10 drops lemon
5 drops lavender
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) Fractionated Coconut Oil

3. Essential Oil Stress Balloons
These stress balloons can be a great reminder to calm down if stress is overwhelming you. Plus, they are fun to play with (which can release endorphins and reduce stress).

Essential Oil Stress Balloons

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. In a glass bowl, mix together the epsom salt and essential oils until well combined.
    As you mix, break up as many clumps as you see so that the epsom salt doesn’t get stuck in the funnel.
  2. Place a funnel into the opening of the latex ballon, and carefully pour the epsom salt into the balloon. It is helpful to have a bowl beneath where you pour so you can catch any fallen salt and pour it into your balloon before tying it.
  3. Once all the epsom salt is in the balloon, pull the salt down into the balloon.
    Make sure the neck is clear of salt before tying off the balloon.
  4. To use, squeeze as you would a stress ball. After several squeezes, you should begin to smell the oil from inside the balloon.

Essential Oil Make & Take Class Idea

You can teach an essential oil class on reducing stress! Use the information in this article and Modern Essentials (see page references below) for your lesson. You can also use any of the following articles as well:
Living a Stress-Free and Healthy Life with Essential Oils
Using the “Introduction to Modern Essentials” as a Mini Textbook for Essential Oil Classes
Coloring with Essential Oil–Scented Pencils for Mental Health
Stress Less Diffuser Blend
Lavender Essential Oil Spotlight
Essential Oil Application: Aromatic
Essential Oil Application: Topical
Essential Oil Dilution
Modern Essentials, 8th Edition, p. 29 (“Nose and Olfactory System”)
Modern Essentials, 8th Edition, p. 341 (“Stress”)
Modern Essentials, 8th Edition, pp. 266–69 (“Emotions”)
Modern Essentials, 8th Edition, pp. 224–25 (“Anxiety”)

After a short lesson about stress and essential oils, allow your attendees to make the Essential Oil Stress Balloon (recipe above), a massage oil blend (oil suggestions above), a roll-on stress blend, or essential oil–scented pencils or send your attendees home with a coloring book, an “Introduction to Modern Essentials” booklet, a lavender essential oil sample, or a diffuser blend in a little sample bottle.

Source: Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Lavender

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) essential oil has a wonderful, sweet, floral aroma with herbaceous, balsamic, and woody undertones. The aroma of lavender has been used for many years in sachets, pillows, and potpourri to help promote feelings of serenity and peace.

Lavender essential oil is a universal oil that has traditionally been known to balance the body and to work wherever there is a need. The list of common primary uses, historical uses, French medicinal uses, and other possible uses contains over 120 conditions. So, if in doubt, use lavender!

Lavender essential oil possesses analgesic, anticoagulant, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, antifungal, antihistaminic, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antimutagenic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, antitumor, cardiotonic, regenerative, and sedative properties.

Body systems often affected by lavender essential oil include the cardiovascular and nervous systems, emotions, and the skin.

Research being conducted on lavender continues to show new possible uses and therapeutic benefits that lavender may possess. To learn more about a number of these research studies, including summaries and sources, please see the book Modern Essentials.

Applications of Lavender Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Lavender essential oil is one of the gentlest essential oils and can be used safely on children, pregnant women, elderly people, animals, and those with sensitive skin. It can be applied neat (with no dilution) when used topically. Apply directly on area of concern or to reflex points.
Aromatic Application: Lavender essential oil can be diffused or inhaled directly. Lavender oil promotes consciousness, health, love, peace, and a general sense of well-being when inhaled. It also nurtures creativity.
Internal Application: Lavender essential oil can be taken internally. Try placing a drop or two under the tongue, taking it in a capsule, adding a little to a beverage, or using it as a flavoring in cooking. If adding lavender to a food or beverage, try using just a toothpick at first, and add more to taste.

5 Ways to Use Lavender Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
The scent of lavender blends well with most oils, especially with citrus oils and other floral oils. As an antihistamine, lavender essential oil is beneficial for relieving allergy symptoms. Its sedative properties make it a great option for promoting a good night’s rest. Try diffusing one of the following blends in your diffuser. You could also add a drop of lavender essential oil to a cloth, tissue, nasal inhaler, or the palms of your hands and breathe in the aroma.

Continue reading

How You Can Use The New Modern Essentials Forum

Imagine a website where you can look up an essential oil to see what others have used the oil for. Would you like a website that you can look up a condition you are struggling with and see what oils others have successfully used? Now imagine that you can ask a question about anything concerning essential oils and get answers from others who also use essential oils. A website like this does exist—and if you haven’t heard about the new Modern Essentials Forum, then now’s the time to learn because it needs people like you to add your experiences and participate online.

The Modern Essentials Forum is a place open to the essential oil community to openly and honestly ask questions and share their experiences concerning essential oils & health-related topics. ModernEssentialsForum.com is a place where you can read and write testimonials about specific oils & blends without worrying about saying the wrong thing.

The Modern Essentials Forum has several different sections: The Basics, Usage Guide, Oil Guide, Business, and Ask & Share (Forum).

The Basics

In The Basics section, you can learn all about the basics of essential oils including general essential oil information about application methods and carrier oils, essential oil troubleshooting (what to do if you have an adverse reaction to an essential oil or accidentally use essential oils inappropriately), and essential oil lingo explained.

Usage Guide

The Usage Guide section allows you to alphabetically search for a condition to learn more about that condition and the top recommended essential oils. You may also find a “Simple Solution” recipe to try. If you have had an experience with using an essential oil for that specific condition, feel free to leave a testimonial about it so others can learn from your experience!

Oil Guide

In the Oil Guide section, you can look up a single oil or oil blend to learn it’s primary uses. You can also look up a carrier oil to learn all about it including what it is made from, ways to use it, and its aroma, viscosity/texture, absorption/feel, color, and shelf life. If you know something about any of these oils, feel free to leave a comment or share an experience you’ve had!

Business

You can find several essential oil business-related articles under the Business section including “How to Hold a Make & Take Class,” “AromaTools® Can Help You with Essential Oil Education and Marketing,” “Top 10 Must-Have Essential Oil Accessories for New Oil Users,” “Intro to Modern Essentials™: A Mini Textbook for Essential Oil Classes,” and several more.

Ask & Share (Forum)

The bulk of the discussion happens in the Ask & Share (Forum) section. This is where you can start a discussion, answer another person’s question, or carry on a conversation about any of the topics. This is the place where we can all learn from each other!

Take the time to share your experiences, ask questions, and help others on their essential oil journey on modernessentialsforum.com!

Essential Oil Spotlight: Orange

Orange essential oil (Citrus sinensis) is cold expressed from the rinds of the fruit. It is very easy to extract—if you have ever peeled an orange, you have likely ended up with essential oil on your hands. The oil is deep golden yellow with a characteristic orange peel aroma.

Orange essential oil is used primarily for anxiety, digestion (sluggish), fear, heart palpitations, insomnia, menopause, nervousness, uplifting, and withdrawals.

Oranges have historically been used for palpitations, scurvy, jaundice, bleeding, heartburn, relaxed throat, prolapse of the uterus and the anus, diarrhea, and blood in the feces. This essential oil may also help appetite, rickety bones, bronchitis, colds, colic (dilute for infants; helps them sleep), dermatitis, digestive system, fever, flu, lower high cholesterol, mouth ulcers, muscle soreness, obesity, sedation, tissue repair, water retention, and wrinkles.

Some of the properties of orange essential oil include anticancer, antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, digestive, sedative, and tonic.

Applications of Orange Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Orange essential oil can be applied neat (with no dilution) when used topically. Apply directly on area of concern or to reflex points. Avoid direct sunlight for up to 12 hours after using on skin.
Aromatic Application: Orange essential oil can be diffused or inhaled directly. Orange oil is calming and uplifting to the mind and body when inhaled.
Internal Application: Orange essential oil can be taken internally and is often used as a flavoring in cooking. Put 1–2 drops of orange oil under the tongue or in a beverage. It can also be taken in capsules.

5 Ways to Use Orange Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Orange essential oil is effective to help influence emotions. It is often used for balancing emotions, confidence, happiness/joy, loss, counteracting negative emotions, feeling overburdened/overwhelmed, pity (especially self-pity), and uplifting the mind. Try diffusing orange essential oil alone or in one of the following recipes:

Here are a few other diffuser blends that use orange essential oil:

2. Add to a Massage Oil or Bath
Try adding one of the following blends to 1 1/2 Tbsp. massage oil, such as fractionated coconut oil, coconut oil, jojoba oil, or sweet almond oil. You can also use these blends in a diffuser or a bath (combine with 1/4 cup epsom salt to evenly disperse throughout the tub).

Uplifting Massage
5 drops juniper berry
3 drops orange
3 drops lime
Invigorating Massage
3 drops cypress
2 drops bergamot
2 drops orange
Relaxing Massage for Men
5 drops sandalwood
4 drops orange
2 drops vetiver

3. Combine in a Roll-on Blend
Orange essential oil is known for helping heart issues, stimulating sluggish digestion, relieving insomnia, and turning frowns into smiles. If you need help with any of these conditions, try making a blend and rolling it on the area of concern or on the bottoms of your feet. Just add the recommended number of drops to a 10 ml roll-on bottle, and then fill the rest of the bottle with a carrier oil, such as fractionated coconut oil, jojoba oil, or sweet almond oil. These recipes are formulated at a 5% dilution ratio.

Circulation Roll-on
7 drops orange
3 drops ylang ylang
2 drops lavender
Digestive Roll-on
(eases constipation)

7 drops orange
3 drops black pepper
2 drops peppermint
Insomnia Roll-on
6 drops orange
6 drops lavender
Happy Roll-on
4 drops orange
4 drops lavender
4 drops ylang ylang

4.  Put in a Natural Mouthwash
Try putting orange essential oil in a coconut oil mouthwash. Just add 1 drop each orange and lemon essential oil to 1 tsp. coconut oil. Swish the solution around in your mouth, and then swallow or spit into the garbage. (Don’t spit into the sink because coconut oil can solidify in the pipes.)

5. Use in Cooking Recipes
Orange essential oil is easy to add to any of your favorite recipes. Just substitute 1 drop of orange oil for 1 tsp. of orange zest. Here are a few of our favorite recipes to help you get started:

Other Ideas Using Orange Essential Oil

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, p. 94.
Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol Schiller & David Schiller

35 Aromatherapy Jewelry Blends

One of our Facebook friends asked us for some recommendations for diffuser blends to use on aromatherapy jewelry. We took the challenge and did some research and experimenting, and now we present to you the following list.

Aromatherapy jewelry is a fairly broad category and consists of any type of jewelry that is porous enough to absorb essential oil such as clay, lava rocks, wicks, felt pads, etc. The oils slowly diffuse by the air current caused by your body movement or existing in the environment. The oils can last anywhere from a few hours to several days (depending on the amount of oil used and the thickness of the oils). Here are a few examples of aromatherapy jewelry that you can purchase from AromaTools:


There are ways to make aromatherapy jewelry on your own, which allows you to create your own custom look. You can find instructions on making clay jewelry here and instructions for making a solid perfume locket here.

Aromatherapy Jewelry Diffuser Blends

The amount of oil drops used on aromatherapy jewelry can range from 1–10 drops depending on the type of jewelry. Clay pendants only need 1–2 drops; wicks can use up to 10 drops. Because of this variance, we decided to keep our blend or oil suggestions to 1–4 drops total. If you really like a recipe, try mixing up a slightly larger batch (20 drops total) in a small sample bottle and then applying 1–2 drops of the blend to your jewelry.

One important thing to remember when adding oils to aromatherapy jewelry is to avoid using essential oils that can irritate the skin, because the jewelry is often worn in direct contact with the skin. If you have sensitive skin and know a certain oil causes irritation, then avoid using that oil with your aromatherapy jewelry.

  • Alertness:
    • Blend 1: 1 drop peppermint, 1 drop orange
    • Blend 2: 1 drop peppermint, 1 drop lemon, 1 drop rosemary
  • ADD/ADHD: 1 drop lavender, 1 drop basil
  • Addictions: 1–2 drops grapefruit
  • Anxiety: 1 drop orange, 2 drops lavender
  • Appetite Suppressant: 1–2 drops grapefruit
  • Calm and Relax:
    • Blend 1: 1 drop ylang ylang, 2 drops lavender, 1 drop Roman chamomile
    • Blend 2: 1 drop lavender, 1 drop Roman chamomile
    • Blend 3: 1 drop bergamot, 1 drop ylang ylang
    • Blend 4: 1 drop bergamot, 1 drop cedarwood, 1 drop juniper berry
    • Blend 5: 1 drop lavender, 1 drop orange, 1 drop cedarwood, 1 drop frankincense
  • Energy:
    • Blend 1: 1–2 drops peppermint
    • Blend 2: 1 drop lime, 1 drop grapefruit, 1 drop orange (or tangerine), 1 drop spearmint (or peppermint)
    • Blend 3: 1 drop bergamot, 1 drop wintergreen
  • Fear: 1 drop lavender, 1 drop ylang ylang
  • Focus: 1 drop lavender, 1 drop petitgrain, 1 drop rosemary, 1 drop orange
  • Irritability: 1 drop cedarwood, 1 drop juniper berry, 1 drop fir
  • Memory: wear and smell while studying and again while taking the test to help recall facts.
    • Blend 1: 1–2 drops rosemary
    • Blend 2: 1 drop rosemary, 1 drop peppermint
  • Mood Swings:
    • Blend 1: 1 drop lavender, 1 drop rosemary, 1 drop peppermint
    • Blend 2: 1 drop clary sage, 1 drop bergamot
  • Mosquito Repellent:
    • Blend 1: 1 drop lavender, 1 drop lemongrass, 1 drop peppermint (or spearmint)
    • Blend 2: 1 drop eucalyptus, 1–2 drops lavender, 1 drop lemongrass
    • Blend 3: 1 drop lavender, 1 drop patchouli
  • Motion Sickness: 1–2 drops peppermint
  • Nausea/Morning Sickness: 1 drop ginger, 1 drop peppermint
  • Romantic Feelings: 1 drop ylang ylang, 1 drop clary sage, 1 drop sandalwood
  • Stress:
    • Blend 1: 1–2 drops lavender
    • Blend 2: 1–2 drops grapefruit
    • Blend 3: 1 drop lemon, 1 drop orange, 1 drop clove, 1 drop cedarwood
  • Uplifting:
    • Blend 1: 1–2 drops lemon
    • Blend 2: 1 drop ylang ylang, 1 drop lavender, 2 drops orange
    • Blend 3: 1 drop lime, 1 drop bergamot, 1 drop orange, 1 drop peppermint
    • Blend 4: 2 drops petitgrain, 1 drop juniper berry, 1 drop orange
    • Blend 5: 2 drops lavender, 1 drop rosemary

Source: Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Cinnamon

Cinnamon essential oil (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) is steam-distilled from the bark of the tree. It contains antibacterial, antidepressant, antifungal, anti-infectious (intestinal, urinary), anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiseptic, antispasmodic (light), antiviral, astringent, immune-stimulant, purifying, sexual-stimulant, and warming properties. It also enhances the action and activity of other oils.

Cinnamon essential oil is commonly used for airborne bacteria, bacterial infections, bites/stings, breathing, diabetes, diverticulitis, fungal infections, immune system (stimulates), infection, libido (low), mold, pancreas support, physical fatigue, pneumonia, typhoid, vaginal infection, vaginitis, viral infections, and warming the body.

Historically, this most ancient of spices was included in just about every prescription issued in ancient China. It was regarded as a tranquilizer, tonic, and stomachic and as being good for depression and a weak heart.

This oil may be beneficial for circulation, colds, coughs, digestion, exhaustion, flu, infections, rheumatism, and warts. Cinnamon oil fights viral and infectious diseases, and testing has yet to find a virus, bacteria, or fungus that can survive in its presence.

Applications of Cinnamon Essential Oil and Safety Data

Cinnamon essential oil is one of the strongest essential oils, and care should be taken when using it.
Topical Application: Before applying cinnamon oil topically, make sure to dilute it 1:3 (1 drop essential oil to at least 3 drops carrier oil). Please note that repeated use of cinnamon essential oil can result in extreme contact sensitization, so make sure to dilute well, avoid when pregnant, and frequently give your body a break in between uses.
Aromatic Application: When diffusing cinnamon essential oil, be careful to not inhale directly from the diffuser, as it may irritate the nasal membranes.
Internal Application: Cinnamon essential oil can be used in cooking, but make sure to start with only a toothpick and add more if needed.

5 Ways To Use Cinnamon Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Try this blend in your diffuser to increase your mental alertness:

2. Use in a Romantic Massage Oil
Because cinnamon essential oil is known to be an aphrodisiac and is a warming oil, it makes a great addition to a romantic massage oil. Here is a great recipe to help you and your spouse enjoy an intimate massage together:

Romantic Massage Oil:
5 drops ylang ylang
1 drop cinnamon
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil such as Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil.

3. Add to a Breath-Freshening Spray
Try adding 2–3 drops each of cinnamon and orange essential oil to this Essential Oil Breath Spray recipe.

4. Add to Cooking Recipes
Cinnamon essential oil is great to add to any of your favorite recipes. We had a difficult time picking from our recipes that use cinnamon essential oil, but here are some of our favorites:

5. Protect Your Plants with This Gardening Spray
Keep birds and bugs from eating your plants with this garden spray.

Protective Gardening Spray

  • Servings: Yield=1 gallon (about 4 liters)
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. To a small glass bowl, add the emulsifier, essential oils, and dish soap in order; gently stir after adding each ingredient. Pour a little (up to 1 cup or 250 ml) water into the bowl, and stir to combine.
  2. Pour mixture into a gallon-sized (4-liter) water jug (mostly full of water). Place the cap on, and carefully shake to combine. Pour mixture into your 16 oz. glass spray bottles.
  3. To use, spray the tops and bottoms of the plant leaves. It is best to spray on a cloudy day or in the evening so the sun and cinnamon essential oil combination doesn’t burn the plants. Apply every couple weeks or as needed. Wait 2–3 days after spraying to harvest any food.

To learn more about cinnamon essential oil, see the book Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources: Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, pp. 48–49; 329–30.