EO-Flavored Water: Cinnamon Orange

The cinnamon-orange flavor combination is popular this time of year, so we decided to try it in our water using essential oils and found the result to be delicious! We tried it 3 different ways with essential oils and found they all taste great (although the orange slices added a little sweetness too!). Try using a cinnamon stick or orange slices with the complementary essential oil, or simply use a toothpick of cinnamon essential oil and a drop of orange essential oil in your water.

Guidelines for Adding Essential Oils to Your Water:

  • Make sure to use an essential oil–safe water bottle! Glass or metal cups, bottles, and straws work great. Plastic should be avoided, especially with cinnamon or citrus essential oils.
  • This Natural Essential Oil Emulsifier really helps disperse the oils throughout your water. Just add 1 drop of emulsifier for every drop of essential oil. If you don’t want to use the emulsifier, then remember to shake the bottle to mix in the oils before drinking. When taken internally, essential oils can irritate the mucous membranes—especially when concentrated on the surface of the water—so make sure to add an emulsifier or shake the bottle really well before drinking.
  • Remember, a little goes a long way! If you don’t know whether you’ll like the taste, start out small—dip a toothpick in the oil and swish it in your water (the more you dip, the more oil you’ll get). A good rule of thumb is 1 drop oil to 1–4 cups of water.
  • Safety Note: Essential oils are very concentrated, and it is easy to overload the body if adding oils to your water every day. Occasionally is fine, but make sure to give your body a break in between uses.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Frankincense

Frankincense (Boswellia frereana, Boswellia carterii, Boswellia sacra) essential oil is steam-distilled from the gum/resin of Burseraceae trees and shrubs. It is well known for its rich, deep, warm, balsamic, and sweet odor.

Frankincense has been used historically as a holy oil in the Middle East. Today it is primarily used for arthritis, asthma, balance, brain (injury), cancer, depression, inflammation, memory, scar prevention, and warts. Frankincense contains anticatarrhal, anticancer, antidepressant, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antitumor, expectorant, immune stimulant, and sedative health properties.

Other common uses of frankincense include aging, bronchitis, diarrhea, herpes, meningitis, sciatic pain, stress, tonsillitis, and wounds. It contains sesquiterpenes, enabling it to go beyond the blood-brain barrier, and can also help the body against infection. It affects emotional balance, the immune and nervous systems, and skin.

Applications of Frankincense Essential Oil and Safety Data:

Topical Application: Frankincense can be applied neat (with no dilution) directly to the area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma of frankincense directly. The aroma of frankincense helps to focus energy, improve concentration, and minimize distractions.
Internal Application: Frankincense can be taken internally. Place 1–2 drops under the tongue, or take in a capsule. Dilute 1 drop oil in 1 tsp. (5 ml) honey or in 1/2 cup (125 ml) of beverage.
Safety Data: For internal application, frankincense is not for children under 6 years old and should be used in greater dilution for children 6 years old and older.

5 Ways to Use Frankincense Essential Oil:

1. Diffuse
Here are some great diffuser blends to help you concentrate and focus your energy.

2. Roll-on Blends
The anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties of frankincense make this an ideal oil to use for arthritis pains. Frankincense is great for your skin and can help to prevent and repair scars. Frankincense has a powerful effect on emotions and helps to focus energy, improve concentration, and minimize distractions—all very helpful when you need to communicate effectively! Try these roll-ons if you need help in these areas:

Arthritis Roll-on
3 drops frankincense
4 drops peppermint
2 drops marjoram
2 tsp. (10 ml) Fractionated
Coconut Oil
Scar Roll-on
4 drops frankincense
4 drops helichrysum
2 tsp. (10 ml) Sweet Almond Oil
Communication
Enhancement Roll-on

5 drops frankincense
5 drops clary sage
5 drops sandalwood
2 tsp. (10 ml) carrier oil
Add essential oils to a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the remainder of the bottle with a carrier oil. Apply the formula to the area of concern (for the Communication Enhancement blend, apply to upper chest, back of the neck, and shoulders). These blends are a 5% dilution, so you can use them daily if needed.

3. Direct Application
Frankincense can be used directly without dilution. Try these simple solutions:

  • Confusion: Inhale frankincense aroma directly from bottle, or rub a drop on your hands and breathe in.
  • Headache: Rub 1 drop each of lavender, peppermint, and frankincense to the base of your neck and forehead, then cup your hands and breath in deep.
  • Inflammation from Injury: Combine 3 drops frankincense and 2 drops lavender in a bowl of cold water. Dampen a washcloth in the mixture, and hold on location for 15–30 minutes.

4. Massage Oil
Frankincense essential oil is helpful in lifting a depressed mood. Try using this massage blend when you are feeling a bit down.

Mood-Elevating Massage Blend
5 drops frankincense
5 drops ginger
5 drops grapefruit
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil
Combine these oils, and massage on the upper chest, back of the neck, and shoulders. Some common carrier oils for massage include Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, and Jojoba Oil.

5. Bath
Make a bath bomb with the following blend for a refreshing bath that is sure to help you breathe easy. You can also simply add this essential oil blend to 1/4 cup (60 g) epsom salt and add to your bath while filling.

Calm Breathing Bath Bomb:
6 drops frankincense
2 drops eucalyptus
2 drops lavender

To learn more about this amazing essential oil, see the book Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, pp. 94–95.
Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol & David Schiller

Peppermint Whipped Cream Cubes for Hot Chocolate

These frozen whipped cream cubes make hot chocolate a fun experience and add a little minty flavor to your cup as well! This recipe can be a healthier alternative to adding marshmallows to your hot chocolate, especially if you follow the substitutions to make this a healthy non-dairy topping!

Peppermint Whipped Cream Cubes

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

  • 1 cup (240 ml) heavy whipping cream (or coconut cream)
  • 2 Tbsp. (17 g) powdered sugar or 1 Tbsp. (15 ml) maple syrup
  • 2–3 drops peppermint essential oil

Instructions:

  1. Using an electric mixer, whisk together the whipping cream, powdered sugar, and peppermint essential oil until it thickens and forms stiff peaks.
  2. Cover a dish with parchment paper, and spread the whipped cream on the parchment paper. You’ll want it at least 1/2″ (1 1/4 cm) thick.
  3. Freeze the cream until solid (about an hour).
  4. Use a cookie cutter to cut out shapes in the cream, and place them in hot chocolate.

Extra Ideas:

  • A chocolate stirring spoon makes the drink more decadent. You can even add a drop of peppermint to the chocolate before pouring into the spoon mold for a little extra mintiness!
  • Forget freezing and just use it as cream. It’s delicious either way!
  • Make “ice cream sandwiches” by placing this cream in between your favorite cookies.

Hand and Foot Warmers

These cute little hand and foot warmers are easy to make and a good way to use up fabric scraps. If you don’t have any fabric scraps, you can pick up the last bits from a roll at a fabric store for very little money.

Not only can these warm up your hands and feet, but if you add essential oils, you can turn them into personal diffusers and customize the scent according to your needs.

Try gifting the hand and foot warmers along with a small sample bottle of oil for refreshing the scent.

Hand and Foot Warmers

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

  • 3″–4″ (7.5–10 cm) fleece squares
  • 1 1/2″ × 2″ (3 3/4 × 5 cm) fleece pieces for pocket (optional)
  • Needle and thread or sewing machine
  • Rice or whole flax seeds
  • Essential oils of choice
  • Small Aroma Pads (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Sew a 1 1/2″ x 2″ (3 3/4 × 5 cm) piece of fleece to the center of one of the fleece squares to make a little pocket. You’ll want to attach it to the square on three sides and leave one side open (you’ll be inserting the small aroma pad in this pocket to customize your scent).
  2. Now take another fleece square that is the same size as the one you sewed the pocket to, and put them together with the pocket side on the outside. Sew these squares together on 3 sides (leave one side open). Note: when you start or end sewing, reverse directions after 10 stitches or so to reinforce the area and prevent it from coming unstitched.
  3. Fill the fleece warmer with rice or whole flax seeds (until 2/3 full—leave enough space to sew the remaining side without rice getting in the way). Add 3–5 drops essential oil to the rice or whole flax seeds (optional, but this helps cover the musty scent of the rice).
  4. Once the rice or whole flax seeds are in, sew up the remaining side.
  5. To use, simply pop your warmers in the microwave for 30 seconds or until pretty warm (but not hot!). Add a few drops of essential oil to the aroma pad, and place it in the little fleece pocket. Use to keep your hands or feet warm by holding them or placing them in mittens or socks. They should stay warm for about 15–20 minutes.

Extra Ideas:

  • Use pinking shears to cut your squares to give them a decorative finish.
  • If you don’t want to sew a pocket for the aroma pad, you can always add your 3–5 drops of essential oil to the rice, then add additional scent directly to the fleece (just avoid citrus essential oils if putting oil directly on the fleece).

Essential Oil Spotlight: Myrrh

Myrrh essential oil is steam-distilled from the gum/resin of the Commiphora myrrha tree. Historically, myrrh has been used as an incense in religious rituals, in embalming, and to help with cancer, leprosy, and syphilis.

The warm, balsamic, and earthy aroma of myrrh promotes awareness and is uplifting. Myrrh is known to have an effect on the hormone, immune, and nervous systems as well as supporting the skin.

Myrrh is highly regarded for its anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antitumor, astringent, and tonic properties. Myrrh has commonly been used to help with cancer, chapped/cracked skin, congestion, dysentery, gum disease, Hashimoto’s disease, hepatitis, hyperthyroidism, infection, liver cirrhosis, skin ulcers, stretch marks, ulcers (duodenal), and weeping wounds.

Other possible uses for myrrh include appetite (increase), asthma, athlete’s foot, candida, catarrh (mucus), coughs, eczema, digestion, dyspepsia (impaired digestion), flatulence (gas), fungal infection, gingivitis, hemorrhoids, mouth ulcers, decongesting the prostate gland, ringworm, sore throats, skin conditions (chapped, cracked, and inflamed), wounds, and wrinkles.

It may also help support the body when dealing with bronchitis, diarrhea, thrush, vaginal thrush, and viral hepatitis.

Applications of Myrrh Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Myrrh essential oil is safe to use without dilution, but it can also be diluted as needed. Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale myrrh essential oil directly. The aroma of myrrh promotes awareness and is uplifting.
Internal Application: Myrrh essential oil can be taken internally in capsules. You can also place 1–2 drops of myrrh under the tongue, dilute in 1 tsp. (5 ml) of honey, or add to 1/2 cup (125 ml) of a beverage (such as non-dairy milk).

5 Ways to Use Myrrh Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
This diffuser blend of myrrh, rose, and lemon can help calm anxiety and soothe heated emotions:

2. Add to Lotion or Cream
Myrrh is known for aiding the skin and is often used to reduce wrinkles, help cracked, chapped, or inflamed skin, and aid the body with healing wounds. It is also beneficial to the respiratory system and may help with coughs, congestion, sore throats, mucus, and inflammation. Try adding myrrh to this Coconut Oil Soothing Balm (for wounds), Antiwrinkle Cream, Winter Salve, Chest Salve, or Simply Luxurious Moisturizing Lotion. You can also use one of the following blends (feel free to double or triple these blends as needed for your recipe):

Respiratory Aid:
6 drops myrrh
4 drops eucalyptus
2 drops thyme
Skin Repair:
5 drops myrrh
3 drops frankincense
2 drops lavender

3. Use in a Roll-on
Myrrh can also be used in a roll-on blend for easy application to wounds, chapped, cracked, or inflamed skin, or on the face as a moisturizer. Here is a good recipe that can work for any of these issues:

Skin Repair Roll-on:
5 drops myrrh (3 drops for children)
3 drops frankincense (2 drops for children)
2 drops lavender (1 drop for children)
2 tsp. (10 ml) jojoba oil
(Original recipe is 5% dilution; children’s recipe is 3% dilution)
Add all ingredients to a 1/3 oz. roll-on bottle.

4. Add to a Bath
Myrrh can also aid the skin, hormone, immune, and nervous systems when added to bathwater. Try mixing 3–5 drops myrrh with 1/4 cup (60 g) epsom salt, or add to a bath bomb.
-Mix with epsom salt, and add to the bathtub as it fills with water. You can also make bath bombs and add 5–10 drops myrrh and 10–15 drops frankincense for a really luxurious bath!

5. Add to Your Oral Care
Though you don’t often see myrrh used in toothpaste or mouthwash, myrrh essential oil is actually a great oil to use in oral care. It is said to help with sore throat, mouth ulcers, gingivitis, gum disease, and wounds. Try adding myrrh to your toothpaste/tooth powder, or make this simple mouthwash to help promote a healthy mouth and prevent gum disease:

Mouthwash:
1/2 tsp. (2 g) Himalayan sea salt
1 cup (240 ml) distilled warm water
10 drops myrrh essential oil
10 drops Natural Essential Oil Emulsifier
8 oz. Glass Bottle with Black Cap
Shot Glass
Stir salt into the warm water until dissolved. Let cool. Add essential oils and essential oil emulsifier to the 8 oz. glass bottle. When the salt water is cool, add it to the bottle, screw the lid on, and shake to combine. Shake before use. Use a shot glass to pour a little into your mouth, then swish and gargle for 30 seconds. Swallow or spit as desired. You can also soak your floss in the mixture before flossing.

To learn more about this amazing essential oil, see the book Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, pp. 94–95.
Aromatherapy Blends & Remedies by Franzesca Watson

Essential Oil Salt Scrub

These cute little salt scrubs make a great gift for anyone in your life that deserves a little extra pampering! Salt scrubs can be very relaxing, and provide great exfoliating benefits to the skin, while soothing the surrounding muscles and tissues. With the recipe below, you can customize the oils you use to fit the needs of the recipient. You can also embellish this scrub with a little citrus zest, dried herbs, or powdered spices to up the wow factor. And speaking of wow—don’t forget to add one of the sweet salt scrub labels pictured below to your jar!

Salt Scrub

  • Servings: Yield=1/2 cup (120 ml)
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. Apply the label to the side of the 4 oz. salve jar. For instructions on applying vinyl labels, click here.
  2. Once your vinyl label is secure, place the salt scrub ingredients in order into the 4 oz. salve jar, screw the lid on and shake to combine.
  3. Lightly scrub the desired location with the salt for a relaxing and exfoliating experience.

Note:

  • Because salt can irritate wounds, avoid using this scrub near open cuts or sores.

Essential Oil Suggestions:

  • Individual Oils: lavender, lime, lemon, grapefruit, geranium, rose, Roman chamomile, or peppermint.
  • Calming Lavender Lemon: 10 drops each of lavender and lemon
  • Refreshing Lemon Rosemary: 5 drops rosemary, 8–10 drops lemon
  • Invigorating Orange Mint: 5 drops each of orange and peppermint
  • Energizing Grapefruit Mint: 6 drops grapefruit, 4 drops peppermint
  • Relaxing Lavender Chamomile: 5 drops Roman chamomile, 8–10 drops lavender
  • Revitalizing Woodlands: 1–2 drops sandalwood, 5 drops fir, 5 drops cypress
  • Holiday Spice: 5 drops orange, 2 drops each of cassia and clove. Optional addition: 1 drop each of ginger and/or cardamom.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Peppermint

Peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil is steam-distilled from the leaves of the plant. Its odor is minty, sharp, and intense.

Some properties of this oil include analgesic, antibacterial, anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, and invigorating.

For centuries, peppermint has been used to soothe digestive difficulties, freshen breath, and relieve colic, gas, headaches, heartburn, and indigestion.

Today, peppermint essential oil is commonly used for alertness, asthma, bacterial infections, chronic fatigue, cold sores, constipation, cooling, cramps/charley horses, dysmenorrhea, fever, flu (influenza), halitosis, headaches, heartburn, herpes simplex, hot flashes, hypothyroidism, indigestion, itching, lactation (decrease milk production), migraines, motion sickness, muscle fatigue, nausea, osteoporosis, sinusitis, throat infection, varicose veins, vomiting, and several other health conditions.

The body systems affected by peppermint essential oil include the Digestive System, Muscles and Bones, Nervous and Respiratory Systems, and Skin.

Research has shown that peppermint essential oil has helped increase endurance during exercise, decreased effects of gamma radiation exposure, reduced pain from headaches, reduced symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, enhanced memory, reduced the intensity of nausea in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, shown antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral properties in various tests (one test showed peppermint essential oil inhibiting resistant strains of Staphylococcus, E. Coli, Salmonella, and Helicobacter pylori), aided digestion by reducing constipation and increasing bowel movement, relieved pain and symptoms of indigestion, and prevented seizures in mice.

Research being conducted on peppermint continues to show new possible uses and therapeutic benefits that peppermint may possess. To learn more about a number of these research studies, including summaries and sources, please see the book Modern Essentials.

Applications of Peppermint Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Peppermint essential oil can be used neat (with no dilution), or it can be diluted 1:1 (1 drop essential oil to 1 drop carrier oil) for children and those with sensitive skin. Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale the aroma of peppermint essential oil directly. The aroma of peppermint is purifying and stimulating to the conscious mind and may aid with memory and mental performance. It is cooling and may help reduce fevers.
Internal Application: Peppermint essential oil can be taken internally. Try placing a drop or two under the tongue, taking it in a capsule or in a beverage, or using it as a flavoring in cooking.
Safey Note: Repeated use of peppermint essential oil can possibly result in contact sensitization. Use this oil with caution if dealing with high blood pressure or if pregnant.

5 Ways to Use Peppermint Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Here are a few great diffuser blends to help you get energized and focused:

2. Use in a Massage Oil
Peppermint is really great at helping to relax muscles and relieve aches and pains. Here is a recipe for a Sore Muscles Salve. You can also try one of the following massage recipes:

Rejuvenating
Massage Blend:

5 drops bergamot
5 drops lemon
3 drops peppermint
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil
Fatigue Relief
Massage Blend:

6 drops peppermint
5 drops rosemary
4 drops grapefruit
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil
Sore Muscles
Massage Blend:

4 drops ylang ylang
4 drops peppermint
3 drops thyme
3 drops ginger
1 drop lemon
1 Tbsp. (15 ml) carrier oil

3. Roll on for a quick energy boost or digestive support.
Peppermint essential oil is great at increasing energy, alertness, and stamina. When you start to feel sluggish during the day and need a little pick-me-up, try rubbing this roll-on on your wrists, neck, or bottoms of your feet. You could also use the Rejuvenating or Fatigue Relief Massage Blend recipes above in a roll-on if you prefer (make sure to halve the recipe for daily use).

Pick Me Up Roll-on:
5 drops lavender (2 drops for daily use)
4 drops peppermint (2 drops for daily use)
3 drops grapefruit (1 drop for daily use)
3 drops lemongrass (1 drop for daily use)
1 tsp. (5 ml) carrier oil like Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil
Add oils to a 5 ml roll-on bottle, or double the recipe if using a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the bottle the rest of the way with a carrier oil. If you plan on using this roll-on on a daily basis, use the drops suggested for daily use, then fill the rest of the roll-on bottle with a carrier oil.

Peppermint oil is also known for supporting the digestive system and can help with constipation, diarrhea, indigestion, irritable bowel system, nausea, vomiting, and gastric ulcers, among other digestive issues. Try rubbing this roll-on blend over your stomach when your digestive system needs a little help.

Digestive Support Roll-on:
2 drops ginger
4 drops peppermint
5 drops lavender (2 drops for children)
5 drops lemon (1 drop for children)
4 drops fennel (1 drop for children)
1 tsp. (5 ml) carrier oil like Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil
Add oils to a 5 ml roll-on bottle, or double the recipe if using a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the bottle the rest of the way with a carrier oil.

4. Cool Your Body
Peppermint is a cooling oil and can help you cool off your body when you get too hot. Here are a few ways you can use peppermint oil to cool off:

  • If you live in a hot climate, these Frozen Eucalyptus Mint Towels may be a lifesaver for you! They are also great for using while you are outside doing yard work or watching your kids at the park.
  • Add a drop of peppermint oil to your water on a hot day. This is a great idea for hiking trips or occasions when you are outside all day.
  • Try a cooling bath using peppermint essential oil. (See recipe below.)
Cooling Bath Salts:
1–2 drops peppermint essential oil
1/4 cup (60 g) Epsom Salt
Mix ingredients together. Add bath salts to the bathtub as it fills up with warm or cool water.

5. Add to Cooking Recipes
Peppermint essential oil can be added to any of your favorite cooking recipes. Just use 1 drop of peppermint oil for every 1 tsp. of dried peppermint leaves or 1 Tbsp. fresh peppermint leaves. Peppermint essential oil can also replace peppermint extract (although you’ll use significantly less). Just add a drop, mix in, taste, and then add more if needed. These are a few of our recipes that include peppermint essential oil:

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, pp. 102–103.

Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol & David Schiller

Hand “Santa”tizer

These cute Hand “Santa”tizers are so easy to make, and they work great as gifts for teachers, neighbors, and friends.

Hand Sanitizer

  • Servings: 5 bottles
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) Witch Hazel or vodka
  • 40–50 drops essential oil (see blend suggestions below)
  • 1 cup (240 ml) aloe vera gel (use aloe vera juice for a spray hand sanitizer)
  • 5 drops Vitamin E Oil
  • Five 2 oz. plastic bottles with treatment pump, disc top, or spray top (see options below)

Instructions:

  1. Add all ingredients in order to a glass bowl or measuring cup, stirring after each addition. Use a funnel to pour the mixture into the bottles.
  2. To use, pump or spray 1–2 times into the palm of your hand. Rub hands together until the liquid evaporates.

Essential Oil Blends:

Melaleuca & Lavender:
30 drops melaleuca
10 drops lavender
Citrus Mint:
20 drops rosemary
16 drops lemon
12 drops peppermint
Holiday Spice:
15 drops orange
10 drops clove
10 drops cassia or 5 drops cinnamon
5 drops eucalyptus
5 drops rosemary
Candy Cane Mist:
25 drops peppermint
10 drops orange
10 drops fir
Peppermint Surprise:
30 drops peppermint
10 drops bergamot,
orange, or ylang ylang
First Snowfall:
25 drops wintergreen
15 drops fir

Extra Idea:

  • If you just want to make a single bottle, follow this recipe: Citrus Mint Hand Sanitizer, and add a total of 15–25 drops essential oil.

Bottle and Vinyl Options:

There are several bottle options you can choose from at aromatools.com. Our favorite involves the treatment pump top. This top works so well at getting just the right amount out each time you use it. Other top options include the disc top and the misting spray top (for a hand sanitizer spray). Most of these bottles work well for this project.

Don’t forget to add a cute vinyl label to the bottle! We now offer 5 vinyl label options (including some normal ones to gift during other seasons!):

Another option is to print your own labels with this blank label sheet.

These are our favorite bottle/vinyl combinations:

Which bottle/vinyl combination do you like best?

Holiday Gift Guide and Refreshing Shampoo

It’s time for holiday gift-giving, and this gift guide includes several ideas for you—one of which we are featuring below!
These gift ideas are not the only reason that you should get your own copy of this guide. Inside you will find a large world map that shows where many popular essential oils come from. This map can be easily displayed in your essential oil class and used to teach your prospective customers about where essential oils are obtained. The gift guide unfolds to reveal this large 11″ × 17″ (28 × 43 cm) chart that can be framed or passed around. Get your free copy here—and feel free to get extras to pass out to your essential oil–loving friends!
As mentioned above, we are highlighting one of the recipes—the Refreshing Rosemary Mint Shampoo—that is found in the gift guide. This shampoo uses peppermint and rosemary essential oils because they are both known to help stimulate hair growth and work well for all hair types. If you prefer a different scent or have different needs, check out Modern Essentials for more essential oil suggestions, and feel free to switch out the oils in this recipe. This shampoo makes a great gift for any of your holistically inclined friends!

Refreshing Peppermint Rosemary Shampoo

  • Servings: Yield=8 oz. (240 ml)
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. Add all ingredients to the bottle in the order listed above.
  2. Shake until all ingredients are thoroughly mixed.

Essential Oil–Flavored Sugar

Have you ever used flavored sugar to sweeten your tea, sprinkle on toast, or use in your baking? Vanilla-flavored sugar is common and quite popular in European desserts, but you can easily make different flavors when you use essential oils. Try making some and using it to flavor toast, pancakes, french toast, crème brûlée, cereal, fruits, or milk and other beverages.
Gift idea: add your flavored sugar to 4 oz. glass salve jars, attach a little plastic spoon and a gift tag, and give it away as a unique neighbor gift.

Essential Oil–Flavored Sugar

  • Servings: Yield=2 cups (400 g)
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. Place the sugar in a glass bowl. Stir in essential oil for a couple minutes.
  2. Fill jar(s) with your flavored sugar, or use right away.

Extra Idea:

  • Scrape out the seeds of a vanilla bean and add them to your sugar along with an essential oil. You can even throw in the vanilla pod for extra flavor.
    (Remove the pod after 2–3 weeks.)

Use your flavored sugar in one of these recipes: