Homemade Soft Deodorant

Making your own deodorant can be a great way to control what ingredients go on your skin and allows you to create your own customized scent! Check out the ingredient substitutions to see how this deodorant can also be made to work with sensitive skin. This soft deodorant is specially formulated with the following ingredients:

Shea Butter: This makes a soft, smooth deodorant and helps reduce the chance of skin irritation. Note: Shea butter contains latex (a natural rubber). If you have an allergy to latex, this ingredient can be substituted in equal proportions with Mango Butter.
Arrowroot Powder: This helps absorb moisture (i.e., sweat).
Baking Soda: Along with raising the pH of the deodorant, baking soda absorbs bad odors, which reduces the stink. Some people are sensitive to baking soda, and it can cause skin irritation. Note: It is common for skin irritation to occur during the first few days (known as the detox period) if you are transitioning from commercial deodorant. If you continue to experience skin irritation, it may be due to the baking soda in the recipe. If you have sensitive skin, try using food-grade diatomaceous earth instead of the baking soda in the recipe.
Coconut Oil: This ingredient is known for killing bad bacteria and for its soothing and moisturizing properties. Many say that after using a coconut oil deodorant, their armpits are smoother and the hairs softer.
Probiotics: Adding some good bacteria to your deodorant can help balance out the bad bacteria that leads to bad odors. This is optional, but it can help increase the effectiveness of the deodorant. Choose a shelf-stable probiotic for the best benefits.
Essential Oils: These not only give your deodorant a pleasant scent but can also help fight bad bacteria, affect your mood, or benefit a variety of other ailments depending on the oils you use.Here are a few essential oil suggestions for deodorant from Modern Essentials:
Single Essential Oils: melaleuca, lavender, geranium, eucalyptus, cedarwood, cypress, spikenard
Essential Oil Combinations:
5 drops lavender + 5 drops melaleuca
9 drops rose (or geranium) + 3 drops orange + 2 drops clove
2 drops marjoram + 2 drops clary sage + 2 drops spearmint (or peppermint) + 2 drops clove + 2 drops patchouli
5 drops orange + 3 drops juniper berry + 2 drops spikenard
4 drops lime + 4 drops orange + 2 drops clove + 2 drops petitgrain
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Essential Oil Spotlight: Spikenard

Spikenard essential oil (Nardostachys jatamansi) gets its name from the spike-shaped rhizomes (or “spikes”) of the plant that the oil is distilled from. Highly prized in the Middle East during the time of Christ, spikenard is referred to several times in the Bible. Spikenard was also used in the preparation of nardinum, a scented oil of great renown during ancient times. Prized in early Egypt, it was used in a preparation called kyphi with other oils like saffron, juniper, myrrh, cassia, and cinnamon.

Spikenard is commonly used for aging skin, insomnia, nervousness, perfume, and rashes. The oil is known for helping in the treatment of allergic skin reactions, and according to Victoria Edwards, “The oil redresses the skin’s physiological balance and causes permanent regeneration.”

It may also help with allergies, candida, flatulent indigestion, insomnia, menstrual difficulties, migraines, nausea, neurological diseases, rashes, staph infections, stress, tachycardia, tension, and wounds that will not heal.

This essential oil contains the following properties: antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, deodorant, relaxing, and skin tonic.

Spikenard has an earthy, animal-like fragrance. It is balancing, soothing, and harmonizing.

Spikenard can be applied neat (without dilution) on adults when used topically on area of concern or to reflex points. It can also be diffused or inhaled directly.

at_spikenard

5 Ways to Use Spikenard Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Try these oil blends in your diffuser:
2. Roll on for Sleep
Spikenard essential oil is also beneficial in helping with insomnia because of its relaxing properties. Here is a good recipe to put in a roll-on bottle to rub on the bottoms of your feet at night when you need a little help falling asleep:

Insomnia Blend:
1 drop Roman chamomile
2 drops lavender
2 drops marjoram
2 drops orange
1 drop tangerine
1 drop ylang ylang
1 drop spikenard
Add oils to a 5 ml roll-on for short-term use or a 10 ml roll-on for daily use. Fill the roll-on the rest of the way with a carrier oil such as fractionated coconut oil, sweet almond oil, or jojoba oil.

All-Natural Deodorant3. Add to Deodorant
Try putting spikenard in your all-natural deodorant. You could even make your own by using this recipe and replace the oils with this blend:
5 drops orange
3 drops juniper berry
2 drops spikenard

4. Add to a Warm Bath
Here is a bath blend that will remind you of being deep in the woodlands:

Relax in the Woodlands Bath:
1 drop spikenard
1 drop vetiver
5 drops cedarwood
10 drops white fir
4 drops cypress
1 cup (240 g) epsom salt
Mix oils in epsom salt, and add 1/4 cup of the mixture to your warm bathwater.

5. Use in a Massage
According to Patricia Davis, spikenard “is a wonderful oil for anybody who is tense or anxious, and has the ability to help people let go of old pain or emotional blocks that they are holding inside. Aromatherapists who work with chakra energy or auric massage would find this a very appropriate oil” (Aromatherapy: An A–Z, p. 301). Try using this blend that includes spikenard for a relaxing massage:

Relaxing Massage Blend:
3 drops neroli
3 drops petitgrain
3 drops marjoram
1 drop spikenard
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) carrier oil (such as Fractionated Coconut Oil, Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil)

To learn more about spikenard essential oil, see the book Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources: Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, p. 110.
Aromatherapy: An A–Z by Patricia Davis.