An Essential Oil-Filled Easter

Easter has become a commercialized holiday, often involving candy-filled, plastic eggs. Many parents don’t want so much candy but still want a fun and meaningful Easter. If that’s you, take a look at these ideas for a healthier holiday!

Easter Eggs and Easter Baskets

Easter Food

Try some of these delicious dishes for your Easter dinner:

Try making these dessert recipes into Easter-egg shapes for a fun treat:

Easter Egg Decor

This holiday project makes a great Easter decoration: Essential Oil Transfer on Easter Eggs.

These candles are a fun family project, and they make a beautiful Easter centerpiece!

Easter Egg Beeswax Candles

  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Print

Supplies:

  • Awl/Knife
  • Eggs
  • White Vinegar
  • Boiling Water
  • Food Coloring
  • Beeswax Pellets
  • Essential Oil
  • Waxed Candle Wicks with Metal Base (available at most craft stores)

Instructions:

  1. Start by poking a tiny hole in the top of your egg with a sharp object, such as an awl or paring knife. Then carefully chip away the top of the egg until you have a nice, wide opening.
  2. Wash out the inside of the eggs and let them dry while preparing the dye.
  3. Combine 2 Tbsp. of white vinegar, 1 cup of boiling water, and 10–20 drops of your desired food coloring in a disposable paper or plastic cup (or other container that you don’t mind getting dye on). Submerge the eggs in the dye 1–20 minutes until you obtain your desired color.
  4. Let the eggs dry. We dried our eggs in the sun on bamboo skewers in a vase, as pictured to the right.
  5. While the eggs are drying, melt the beeswax in a double boiler on the stove. A heat-proof glass measuring cup in a pot of boiling water works great for this (and the measuring cup makes it easy to pour the beeswax later). You will need about 1 oz. of beeswax for each egg you make.
  6. Mix a few drops of essential oil into the melted beeswax (1–2 drops for each candle). If you want to vary the type of essential oil you use in each candle, you can add the essential oil after you pour the beeswax into the eggshells.
  7. Carefully pour the beeswax into the dried eggshells. Then place your wick in the middle of the eggshell and let the beeswax harden. You can put your egg candles back in the egg carton to stabilize them while you pour the beeswax and insert the wick.
  8. Once the beeswax has hardened completely, move your egg candles to egg cups or any decorative container that will hold them upright.
  9. Enjoy your beautiful Easter creation! These eggshell candles look great as a table centerpiece or on a mantle or shelf.

Essential Oil Transfer on Easter Eggs

Did you know you can use essential oils to transfer prints from a laser printer or copier onto fabric, wood, or other materials? This easy method is a lot of fun and opens up many possibilities for personalized gifts with a really neat effect! We decided to try this method when decorating Easter eggs, and it worked pretty well!

AT_EOTransferEasterEggs1

As you can see in the above picture, the transfer works better on the light colored eggs. `The egg right behind the bottle also has an ink transfer on it (green and red), but the darker background makes it more difficult to see.

AT_EOTransfer_EasterEggs_Step1

Start by gathering your materials. You will need an image, design, or text (about 1/2 inch to 2 inches in size works best for Easter eggs). Use a program like Microsoft Paint or Photoshop to lay out your words or design. For this process, dark, solid text and pictures work best, as the image will fade a bit during the transfer. This can lead to some really cool vintage or antiqued looks when finished but can appear too faded if you choose something with light colors or faint gradients. When you have the design looking how you want it, select the design, and use the program’s flip or rotate tools to flip the design horizontally so you have a mirror-image of the design. Print the design onto normal copier paper using a laser printer (or copy it on a toner-based copier). Note: Be certain your printer or copier uses toner. This method doesn’t work with inkjet or wax systems.

Other materials you will need include a hard-boiled egg, tape, a popsicle stick (or other hard, straight-edged object), a cotton swab, a small glass bowl (we used a shot glass), and orange essential oil.

AT_EOTransfer_EasterEggs_Step2

Cut out your design, leaving a little room for the tape. Place your design where you want it (face down so the ink touches the egg), and tape it to the egg. Because the surface of the egg isn’t flat, you will need to pinch and cut the paper as needed to get the ink to lay as flat as possible against the egg. This part of the process is a lot easier when working with materials that can lay flat like wood or fabric.

AT_EOTransfer_EasterEggs_Step3

Add a few drops of orange essential oil to your small glass bowl or shot glass. You only need a couple drops per design; so start with less, and add more as needed.

AT_EOTransfer_EasterEggs_Step4

Dip the cotton swab in the essential oil, and rub the oil onto the back of your design. Your design will show through the paper as you rub the oil on.

AT_EOTransfer_EasterEggs_Step5

Next, use the popsicle stick to rub completely over the back of the printed design. This presses the toner onto the egg, so you need to be fairly firm; but don’t press down so hard that you crack the egg or tear through the paper. Be certain to rub over all parts of the design. If you have a larger or more complicated design, you may want to apply oil over a small part of it, rub over that part to transfer it, and then move on to the next area to help prevent missing any part of the design.

AT_EOTransfer_EasterEggs_FinalResult

Once you are certain that you have firmly rubbed over the entire design (you can always try peeking under the paper or do a second coat of oil and rub again if you aren’t sure), remove the paper, and see your result.  If you missed an area, you may be able to re-position and tape the paper back to the egg and try again; but it is much easier to get it right the first time. Once it looks good, you can use a blow dryer to help the ink set. For the eggs, you can also just let the ink dry, but using a hot blow dryer really helps set the ink when you are doing an essential oil transfer on wood or fabric.

Essential Oil Transfer

  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • A laser printer or copier (Be certain your printer or copier uses toner. This method doesn’t work with inkjet or wax systems.)
  • Hard-boiled egg
  • Cotton swabs
  • Small glass bowl or Shot Glass
  • Orange essential oil
  • Popsicle stick or other straight-edged, rigid object
  • Blow dryer

Instructions:

  1. Use a program like Microsoft Paint or Photoshop to lay out your words or design. For this process, dark, solid text and pictures work best, as the image will fade a bit during the transfer. This can lead to some really cool vintage or antiqued looks when finished but can appear too faded if you choose something with light colors or faint gradients. When you have the design looking how you want it, select the design and use the program’s flip or rotate tools to flip the design horizontally so you have a mirror-image of the design. Print the design onto normal copier paper using a laser printer (or copy it on a toner-based copier).
  2. Place the print of the design over the egg (or other material) with the printed side against the egg (face-down). Use scotch or masking tape to hold the print in place. You may need to pinch or cut the paper to get the ink to lie as flat as possible against the surface of the egg.
  3. Place several drops of orange oil in a small glass bowl or shot glass (the amount you’ll need will depend on the size of the transfer). Start with a couple drops, and add more as needed.
  4. Dip a cotton swab into the orange oil, and then swab the oil over the back of the printed design a little at a time (the design will become visible through the paper as you swab the oil over it).
  5. Use a popsicle stick to rub completely over the back of the printed design. This presses the toner onto the egg, so you need to be fairly firm; but don’t press down so hard that you crack the egg or tear through the paper. Be certain to rub oil over all parts of the design. If you have a larger design, you may want to apply oil over a small part of it, rub over that part to transfer it to the egg, and then move on to the next area to help prevent missing any part of the design.
  6. Peek under the paper, or carefully peel back one corner or side of the design to ensure you didn’t miss transferring any part of it. If you did, carefully replace the paper in the same spot, and rub over the missing areas to transfer them. When finished, remove the paper and tape from the egg.
  7. Use a blow dryer on its hottest setting to blow hot air over the design to help fuse it onto the egg.

Extra Ideas:

  1. The things you can do with this method are virtually endless! Use this method to create personalized aprons, totes, gift tags, gift bags, stockings, game/play mats, t-shirts, ribbons, and whatever else you can think of!
  2. This method can also be used to transfer prints onto wood with some neat effects, as the transfer will transfer around the grain and texture of the wood.

Scented Easter Play Dough

This Easter, add essential oil–scented play dough to your kids’ Easter baskets for a great sensory experience and hours of fun.

Easter-Play-Dough-1

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Honey Essential Oil Ham Glaze

This Easter, make your ham stand out above the rest with this delicious Honey Essential Oil Ham Glaze. And while your relatives are enjoying your dinner masterpiece, you will easily be able to share the recipe with them––and your love for essential oils!

Easter-Ham

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Essential Oil Bunny Buddies

You will love this fun idea for making essential oil–scented rice bunnies! These darling bunnies are perfect for including in children’s Easter baskets, using as an Easter decoration, or for warming like a heat pack and giving to a child before bed as a warm, snuggly friend.

Green grass hills summer background.
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