Are You Happy?

Our post today is by Rebecca Hintze, mental health expert and author of several books, including the following form AromaTools.com:

Keep reading, and take a moment to analyze your state of happiness and look for ways you can improve. Thank you, Rebecca, for sharing your knowledge with us!


Everyone wants to be happy, and everybody can be when we have healthy attitudes, beliefs, and values. Despite the increase in psychiatric drug use and talk of emotional disorders, the truth is, most people are happy. According to a recent study, people who live in relatively free countries (and aren’t in prison or psychiatric institutions) declare to be a least moderately cheerful in spite of their age, gender, and financial status.

It’s true that happy people behave and think differently than unhappy people. If we want to be one of the happy folks, we may need to take inventory of the following factors. Since the choice is ours, we can begin today to identify and adjust the reasons why we’re not behaving, believing—and therefore creating—happy lives.
According to research, here’s what makes a happy person:

  • Happy people are more loving, forgiving, trusting, decisive, creative, sociable, and helpful.
  • Some say that money doesn’t make you happy. This is not necessarily true. Research has shown that happier people have more money. There is a connection between wealth and well-being, though it is not significant. Stress from financial disorder does lead to depression. However, wealth cannot be attributed to redeeming a depressed person. And money only reports to support happiness when it meets needs and a little bit more. Wealth alone doesn’t predict happiness.
  • Happy people are more likely to set optimistic goals and strive to meet them.
  • Happy people have healthier immune systems that result from happy attitudes.
  • Happy people don’t suppress good feelings when they feel them. They laugh when they feel like it. If they receive a compliment, they accept it.
  • Happy people are less self-focused.
  • Happy people are less violent and aggressive.
  • Happier people are usually spiritual people. Though some studies show that some forms of active spirituality can correlate with prejudice and guilt, for the most part, a belief in God—and consequently, an active spiritual life—correlates well with several mental health criteria. People who are active in their church tend to be less likely to abuse drugs and alcohol, divorce, or commit suicide.
  • Happy people have strong support systems. When we have a large crowd of loving friends and family, we are happier and healthier, and less likely to die prematurely.
  • Happy people are married. A large amount of data show that people are happier when they are attached, particularly married.

We have the choice to be happy by changing behaviors that make us unhappy.

For this week’s personal growth, take inventory of your state of happiness.

Ask yourself:

  • Do I have a healthy support system? If not, why? Do I have emotional walls that push people away, including a spouse or potential mate? If so, why?
  • Am I in debt or without a sufficient income and stressed as a result? If so, how did I get to this point? What beliefs do I have about money that prevent me from creating abundance?
  • Am I self-absorbed? If so, why? Do I believe I am worthy to have my needs met and do I allow others to meet my needs?
  • Do I set optimistic goals and try to reach them? If not, why?
  • Do I suppress laughter and reject compliments? If so, why?
  • Am I spiritually connected, believing in a divine, higher power of love, light, and truth?
  • Am I willing to love, forgive, trust, serve, and interact with others? If not, why?

For extra support, consider regularly diffusing citrus essential oils. All citrus essential oils are natural mood uplifters. With regular use, they have the ability to uplift mood and encourage happiness. Through self-exploration and by taking action, we can unlock the doors to living happier lives.

Many Blessings,

Rebecca Hintze

About the Author


Rebecca Hintze, MS, is considered an expert in the field of mental health, specializing in family issues and emotional intelligence. She is the international bestselling author of Healing Your Family History, distributed worldwide and translated into 8 different languages. She is the creator of The Emotions Mentor Course Series, and she’s also the author of the books Essentially Happy, Essential Oils for Happy Living, and Emotions and Essential Oils: An A–Z Guide.

Today, Rebecca speaks to audiences worldwide on healing family patterns, overcoming destructive behavior, increasing emotional intelligence, resolving health care issues naturally through essential oils and supplementation, and resolving family conflict.

Becoming Essentially Happy in the Face of Depression

Today’s post was written by a member of our AromaTools™ team based on her personal experiences.

Depression is something I never understood until I lived with someone who had it. I am a generally positive and optimistic person. My son has always been a “glass-half-empty” kind of guy. He would always come up with the pessimistic point of view. I have always known that we are polar opposites and just figured this was part of the difference in our personalities. As a teen though, his “pessimism” became concerning as he grew more and more despondent and withdrawn. My husband and I became increasingly worried about him as he further withdrew and talked about not wanting to live. He agreed to see our family physician. We thought our physician might refer us to a psychiatrist or therapist; instead, he encouraged me to take our son straight to the emergency room and get him admitted if I wanted to save his life. And so began my journey of coming to understand depression as best an outsider could. I’ve always believed you could choose your attitude––and to an extent that is true––but people who suffer from depression don’t always get to choose their attitude. Depression is a real thing. It is debilitating, and it hurts the individual who has it as well as those around them.

While working with my son, I have tried to learn more about depression and how I can be a better support. When I saw the new book Essentially Happy by Rebecca Linder Hintze with Stephanie Gunning, I thought that it would be a great resource for me.

This book aligns well with what our therapists and doctors have been telling us and also gave me additional information on how to better incorporate essential oils and better nutrition into the care of my son. In this book, Rebecca Hintze outlines 3 simple answers from Mother Nature for overcoming depression.

1. Happy Nutrition

2. Happy Lifestyle

3. Happy Relationships

The book gives a variety a great natural ideas for overcoming and working with depression. In each section, she goes deeper into how “happy” nutrition, lifestyle, and relationships can improve your life. She shares a variety of holistic remedies, including essential oils for helping various mood disorders such as anxiety, depression, and insomnia. She also includes a section on the emotional impact of essential oils. Her goal in this book is to “suggest tools and techniques to sustain and improve your mood no matter where you fall on the scale of happiness and depression.”

We already have seen first-hand how some of the ideas in this book can be beneficial. Our family doctor tells us that the most important medicine is what we put on the end of our fork. Hintze’s suggestions for “happy nutrition” support that idea, and she shares several ideas that could help decrease depression based on what you eat.

One of the ideas she talks about in the section on “happy lifestyle” is mindfulness. Mindfulness is a concept my son’s therapists have taught us to help us be more aware of how we are feeling and what we are thinking as well as being present in the moment. It has taken a lot of effort to try to be truly mindful as we navigate our new normal; but I find that when I take the time to be mindful, I am more at peace in the storm that surrounds me.

The last section of her book addresses “happy relationships.” Depression can put a real strain on relationships, but we need each other, and we need to not give up on those around us––whether we are the one struggling with depression or a loved one trying to support someone with depression. Our relationships are what matter the most. They are worth fighting for, and learning how to change our attitudes and perceptions to allow healing to begin is crucial for those relationships to grow. I have seen positive change in our family when I am willing to step back and try to be more open to a different way of thinking.

By improving our nutrition, lifestyle, and relationships, we each can be “Essentially Happy” and work towards overcoming the crippling effects of depression and living a happier life. If you or someone you know suffers from depression, this book may be a great resource for you as well.