Essential Oil Saltwater Mouthwash

Saltwater makes a great mouthwash because the it alkalizes the mouth, creating an environment that stops the growth of bacteria. Additionally, saltwater is astringent and speeds wound healing by reducing inflammation and contracting the tissues. We included essential oils in our saltwater mouthwash because their antibacterial properties kill the existing bacteria and help freshen the breath.

Some good oils to use in a mouthwash include peppermint, melaleuca, orange, cinnamon, clove, lemon, myrrh, or an antibacterial blend. Try using a single oil or mixing a couple to create your own custom blend! Though you don’t often see myrrh used in mouthwash, myrrh essential oil is actually a great oil to use in oral care because it is said to help with sore throats, mouth ulcers, gingivitis, gum disease, and wounds.

This mouthwash is great to use on a daily basis or even just when your mouth needs a little help healing from mouth wounds or conditions.

Saltwater Mouthwash

  • Servings: Yield=1 cup (240 ml)
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. Stir salt into the warm water until dissolved. Let cool.
  2. Pour essential oils and essential oil emulsifier into the 8 oz. glass bottle. When the saltwater is cool, add it to the bottle, screw the lid on, and shake to combine.
  3. To use, shake first, pour a little into a shot glass (about 1/2 a shot glass), and then pour the liquid into your mouth. Swish and gargle for 30 seconds. Swallow or spit as desired.

Extra Idea:

  • Place a little of the mixture into a shot glass, and soak your floss or flosser before using it to floss your teeth for help in cleaning the hard-to-access areas.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Myrrh

Myrrh essential oil is steam-distilled from the gum/resin of the Commiphora myrrha tree. Historically, myrrh has been used as an incense in religious rituals, in embalming, and to help with cancer, leprosy, and syphilis.

The warm, balsamic, and earthy aroma of myrrh promotes awareness and is uplifting. Myrrh is known to have an effect on the hormone, immune, and nervous systems as well as supporting the skin.

Myrrh is highly regarded for its anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antitumor, astringent, and tonic properties. Myrrh has commonly been used to help with cancer, chapped/cracked skin, congestion, dysentery, gum disease, Hashimoto’s disease, hepatitis, hyperthyroidism, infection, liver cirrhosis, skin ulcers, stretch marks, ulcers (duodenal), and weeping wounds.

Other possible uses for myrrh include appetite (increase), asthma, athlete’s foot, candida, catarrh (mucus), coughs, eczema, digestion, dyspepsia (impaired digestion), flatulence (gas), fungal infection, gingivitis, hemorrhoids, mouth ulcers, decongesting the prostate gland, ringworm, sore throats, skin conditions (chapped, cracked, and inflamed), wounds, and wrinkles.

It may also help support the body when dealing with bronchitis, diarrhea, thrush, vaginal thrush, and viral hepatitis.

Applications of Myrrh Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Myrrh essential oil is safe to use without dilution, but it can also be diluted as needed. Apply to reflex points and/or directly on area of concern.
Aromatic Application: Diffuse, or inhale myrrh essential oil directly. The aroma of myrrh promotes awareness and is uplifting.
Internal Application: Myrrh essential oil can be taken internally in capsules. You can also place 1–2 drops of myrrh under the tongue, dilute in 1 tsp. (5 ml) of honey, or add to 1/2 cup (125 ml) of a beverage (such as non-dairy milk).

5 Ways to Use Myrrh Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
This diffuser blend of myrrh, rose, and lemon can help calm anxiety and soothe heated emotions:

2. Add to Lotion or Cream
Myrrh is known for aiding the skin and is often used to reduce wrinkles, help cracked, chapped, or inflamed skin, and aid the body with healing wounds. It is also beneficial to the respiratory system and may help with coughs, congestion, sore throats, mucus, and inflammation. Try adding myrrh to this Coconut Oil Soothing Balm (for wounds), Antiwrinkle Cream, Winter Salve, Chest Salve, or Simply Luxurious Moisturizing Lotion. You can also use one of the following blends (feel free to double or triple these blends as needed for your recipe):

Respiratory Aid:
6 drops myrrh
4 drops eucalyptus
2 drops thyme
Skin Repair:
5 drops myrrh
3 drops frankincense
2 drops lavender

3. Use in a Roll-on
Myrrh can also be used in a roll-on blend for easy application to wounds, chapped, cracked, or inflamed skin, or on the face as a moisturizer. Here is a good recipe that can work for any of these issues:

Skin Repair Roll-on:
5 drops myrrh (3 drops for children)
3 drops frankincense (2 drops for children)
2 drops lavender (1 drop for children)
2 tsp. (10 ml) jojoba oil
(Original recipe is 5% dilution; children’s recipe is 3% dilution)
Add all ingredients to a 1/3 oz. roll-on bottle.

4. Add to a Bath
Myrrh can also aid the skin, hormone, immune, and nervous systems when added to bathwater. Try mixing 3–5 drops myrrh with 1/4 cup (60 g) epsom salt, or add to a bath bomb.
-Mix with epsom salt, and add to the bathtub as it fills with water. You can also make bath bombs and add 5–10 drops myrrh and 10–15 drops frankincense for a really luxurious bath!

5. Add to Your Oral Care
Though you don’t often see myrrh used in toothpaste or mouthwash, myrrh essential oil is actually a great oil to use in oral care. It is said to help with sore throat, mouth ulcers, gingivitis, gum disease, and wounds. Try adding myrrh to your toothpaste/tooth powder, or make this simple mouthwash to help promote a healthy mouth and prevent gum disease:

Mouthwash:
1/2 tsp. (2 g) Himalayan sea salt
1 cup (240 ml) distilled warm water
10 drops myrrh essential oil
10 drops Natural Essential Oil Emulsifier
8 oz. Glass Bottle with Black Cap
Shot Glass
Stir salt into the warm water until dissolved. Let cool. Add essential oils and essential oil emulsifier to the 8 oz. glass bottle. When the salt water is cool, add it to the bottle, screw the lid on, and shake to combine. Shake before use. Use a shot glass to pour a little into your mouth, then swish and gargle for 30 seconds. Swallow or spit as desired. You can also soak your floss in the mixture before flossing.

To learn more about this amazing essential oil, see the book Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 9th Edition, pp. 94–95.
Aromatherapy Blends & Remedies by Franzesca Watson

Essential Oil Spotlight: Orange

Orange essential oil (Citrus sinensis) is cold expressed from the rinds of the fruit. It is very easy to extract—if you have ever peeled an orange, you have likely ended up with essential oil on your hands. The oil is deep golden yellow with a characteristic orange peel aroma.

Orange essential oil is used primarily for anxiety, digestion (sluggish), fear, heart palpitations, insomnia, menopause, nervousness, uplifting, and withdrawals.

Oranges have historically been used for palpitations, scurvy, jaundice, bleeding, heartburn, relaxed throat, prolapse of the uterus and the anus, diarrhea, and blood in the feces. This essential oil may also help appetite, rickety bones, bronchitis, colds, colic (dilute for infants; helps them sleep), dermatitis, digestive system, fever, flu, lower high cholesterol, mouth ulcers, muscle soreness, obesity, sedation, tissue repair, water retention, and wrinkles.

Some of the properties of orange essential oil include anticancer, antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, digestive, sedative, and tonic.

Applications of Orange Essential Oil and Safety Data

Topical Application: Orange essential oil can be applied neat (with no dilution) when used topically. Apply directly on area of concern or to reflex points. Avoid direct sunlight for up to 12 hours after using on skin.
Aromatic Application: Orange essential oil can be diffused or inhaled directly. Orange oil is calming and uplifting to the mind and body when inhaled.
Internal Application: Orange essential oil can be taken internally and is often used as a flavoring in cooking. Put 1–2 drops of orange oil under the tongue or in a beverage. It can also be taken in capsules.

5 Ways to Use Orange Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Orange essential oil is effective to help influence emotions. It is often used for balancing emotions, confidence, happiness/joy, loss, counteracting negative emotions, feeling overburdened/overwhelmed, pity (especially self-pity), and uplifting the mind. Try diffusing orange essential oil alone or in one of the following recipes:

Here are a few other diffuser blends that use orange essential oil:

2. Add to a Massage Oil or Bath
Try adding one of the following blends to 1 1/2 Tbsp. massage oil, such as fractionated coconut oil, coconut oil, jojoba oil, or sweet almond oil. You can also use these blends in a diffuser or a bath (combine with 1/4 cup epsom salt to evenly disperse throughout the tub).

Uplifting Massage
5 drops juniper berry
3 drops orange
3 drops lime
Invigorating Massage
3 drops cypress
2 drops bergamot
2 drops orange
Relaxing Massage for Men
5 drops sandalwood
4 drops orange
2 drops vetiver

3. Combine in a Roll-on Blend
Orange essential oil is known for helping heart issues, stimulating sluggish digestion, relieving insomnia, and turning frowns into smiles. If you need help with any of these conditions, try making a blend and rolling it on the area of concern or on the bottoms of your feet. Just add the recommended number of drops to a 10 ml roll-on bottle, and then fill the rest of the bottle with a carrier oil, such as fractionated coconut oil, jojoba oil, or sweet almond oil. These recipes are formulated at a 5% dilution ratio.

Circulation Roll-on
7 drops orange
3 drops ylang ylang
2 drops lavender
Digestive Roll-on
(eases constipation)

7 drops orange
3 drops black pepper
2 drops peppermint
Insomnia Roll-on
6 drops orange
6 drops lavender
Happy Roll-on
4 drops orange
4 drops lavender
4 drops ylang ylang

4.  Put in a Natural Mouthwash
Try putting orange essential oil in a coconut oil mouthwash. Just add 1 drop each orange and lemon essential oil to 1 tsp. coconut oil. Swish the solution around in your mouth, and then swallow or spit into the garbage. (Don’t spit into the sink because coconut oil can solidify in the pipes.)

5. Use in Cooking Recipes
Orange essential oil is easy to add to any of your favorite recipes. Just substitute 1 drop of orange oil for 1 tsp. of orange zest. Here are a few of our favorite recipes to help you get started:

Other Ideas Using Orange Essential Oil

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, p. 94.
Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol Schiller & David Schiller