Essential Oil Spotlight: Frankincense


frankincenseFrankincense essential oil is steam-distilled from the resin of trees and shrubs in the Burseraceae family. The aroma helps to focus energy, improve concentration, and enhance meditation.

Historically, frankincense was used in the Middle East as an ingredient in holy incense for sacrificial ceremonies and to improve communication with the Creator. The French use it for asthma, depression, and ulcers.

This oil acts as an antidepressant, anticancer, antiseptic, and sedative. It is commonly used to treat allergies, bronchitis, colds, headaches, sores, strep throat, and typhoid. Frankincense is generally recognized as safe for consumption by the FDA and can be used topically, diffused, or taken orally.

To learn more about frankincense essential oil and many other pure essential oils, see the book Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources: Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, p. 63.

‘Tis the Season for Sickness

Seasonal changes can stress our immune systems, making us more susceptible to illness. Diffusing Protective Blend and using it on household surfaces can help avoid trouble. But it’s also best to be prepared with some “simple solutions,” should sickness strike.

Easy tips and recipes for colds, cold sores, congestion, cough, earache, and fever can be found in our new booklet, “Modern Essentials: Simple Solutions”—along with 150 entries for other common ailments.

at_1157_lifestyle

Colds:

  • Blend 5 drops each lemon and thyme in 1 Tbs. (15 ml) jojoba oil. Apply a small amount to throat, forehead, chest, and back of neck 2–3 times daily.
  • For adults and children, you can also diffuse thyme oil in an aromatherapy diffuser.

Cold Sores:

  • Combine 4 tsp. (6 g) beeswax pellets, 1 Tbs. (10 g) cocoa butter, and 3 Tbs. (45 ml) jojoba oil, and melt in a microwave (30 seconds at a time, stirring in between) or in a double boiler. Cool slightly, and add 5 drops each helichrysum, melissa, and peppermint. Pour into small jars or lip balm containers, and allow to cool completely. Apply a small amount to cold sores as needed.

Congestion:

  • Diffuse Respiratory Blend in an aromatherapy diffuser.
  • Drop 2 drops eucalyptus and 1 drop peppermint on the floor of the shower to inhale the vapors while showering.
  • Combine 6 Tbs. (90 ml) coconut oil and 1½ Tbs. (7.5 g) beeswax pellets, and melt in a microwave (30 seconds at a time, stirring in between) or in a double boiler. Let cool slightly, and add 20 drops eucalyptus, 15 drops lemon, and 20 drops peppermint. Pour into small jars or salve containers, and allow to cool completely. Apply a small amount on the chest and throat as needed.

Cough:

  • Diffuse Respiratory Blend in an aromatherapy diffuser.
  • Mix 1 drop each eucalyptus and lemon with 1 Tbs. (15 ml) honey (local and raw preferred). Blend about 1/3 of this mixture in 1 cup (240 ml) warm water, and drink slowly.
  • Combine 1 drop each eucalyptus, lemon, and melaleuca with 1 tsp. (5 ml) jojoba oil, and apply over chest and back.

Earache:

  • Put 1 drop each basil and melaleuca on a piece of cotton ball. Place over (not in) the ear canal for 30 minutes.
  • For children, dilute above combination with carrier oil or garlic oil extract (can pierce and use garlic capsules)—which also has antibacterial and antiviral properties.

Fever:

  • Blend 2 drops each eucalyptus and peppermint in bowl of cool water. Moisten a washcloth with this water, and sponge the forehead, back of neck, and feet.

Source: “Modern Essentials: Simple Solutions” Booklet

For more helpful tips, see our article on Staying Healthy This Winter Season.

’Tis also the season for sharing, so be sure to pass along these tips for making winter days more merry and bright.

Coloring with Essential Oil–Scented Pencils for Mental Health

Adult coloring books are all the rage right now. Did you know the act of coloring can be therapeutic and help with managing emotions, curbing addictions, reducing stress and anxiety, and increasing self-esteem? If you have a hard time focusing, try coloring! It’s been found that coloring can help bring about more mindfulness and has the same effect as meditating.
at_scentedpencilsNow, let’s bring essential oils into the picture. Due to our amazing olfactory receptors, which identify odors and initiate the aromatic pathway, and their connection to the limbic system (which includes the amygdala), essential oils are able to have a profound psychological effect, including an influence on emotions. So if you combine essential oils with coloring, you have the ability to do amazing things for your mental health! The easiest way to do this is to turn your colored pencils into mini diffusers.

You can easily make scented pencils with your essential oils, especially with pencils that don’t have erasers. Just add a drop or two of essential oil to each pencil. You can add the essential oil to the bottom of the pencil (where the eraser typically would be) or along the length of it if your pencils don’t have a covering like these Mini Colored Pencils.

at_coloringbook_pencils

Essential Oil Suggestions:

You really could just pick your favorite essential oil or oil blend to scent your pencils with, or coordinate the color of the pencil with the scent (such as pairing lemon with the yellow pencil, peppermint with the blue or green pencil, lime with the green pencil, etc.), but we would like to suggest that you choose oils that may help increase the mental health benefits of coloring. Here are a few top single oil recommendations from Modern Essentials:
Alertness: peppermint, ylang ylang, black pepper, juniper berry, cinnamon
Anger: lavender, ylang ylang, melissa, helichrysum
Anxious: lavender, orange, lemon
Balance: geranium, juniper berry, lavender, orange, sandalwood, vetiver
Blocks (emotional): cypress, frankincense, helichrysum, sandalwood
Coldness: myrrh, ylang ylang
Concentration: lavender, lemon, peppermint
Confidence: cedarwood, orange
Creativity: frankincense, sandalwood, cypress, lemon
Defeated: cypress, white fir, juniper berry
Depression: lemon, frankincense, lavender, bergamot
Fear: ylang ylang, orange, sandalwood
Grief/Sorrow: lemon, lavender, bergamot, orange, grapefruit, wintergreen
Happiness/Joy: lemon, orange, spearmint, sandalwood, bergamot
Loss: tangerine, orange
Mind (open): frankincense, sandalwood
Negative emotions: orange, grapefruit, white fir, wintergreen, lavender
Overburdened/Overwhelmed: orange
Peace: lavender, ylang ylang, melissa
Pity (self-pity): orange
Positive (feeling): basil, peppermint, frankincense, cedarwood, juniper berry
Rejection: lavender, geranium
Release: Roman chamomile
Stress: clary sage, bergamot, lavender, lemon, ylang ylang, petitgrain, grapefruit
Uplifting: lemon, orange
Worried: bergamot
Please see Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition (pp. 266–69), for essential oil blend recommendations and other information about essential oils and emotions.

Also, check out our new “Modern Essentials: Essential Oil Coloring Therapy Book” and the “Basil is Brave” Activity Book to use with your essential oil–scented pencils!

Essential Oil Spotlight: Spikenard

Spikenard essential oil (Nardostachys jatamansi) gets its name from the spike-shaped rhizomes (or “spikes”) of the plant that the oil is distilled from. Highly prized in the Middle East during the time of Christ, spikenard is referred to several times in the Bible. Spikenard was also used in the preparation of nardinum, a scented oil of great renown during ancient times. Prized in early Egypt, it was used in a preparation called kyphi with other oils like saffron, juniper, myrrh, cassia, and cinnamon.

Spikenard is commonly used for aging skin, insomnia, nervousness, perfume, and rashes. The oil is known for helping in the treatment of allergic skin reactions, and according to Victoria Edwards, “The oil redresses the skin’s physiological balance and causes permanent regeneration.”

It may also help with allergies, candida, flatulent indigestion, insomnia, menstrual difficulties, migraines, nausea, neurological diseases, rashes, staph infections, stress, tachycardia, tension, and wounds that will not heal.

This essential oil contains the following properties: antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, deodorant, relaxing, and skin tonic.

Spikenard has an earthy, animal-like fragrance. It is balancing, soothing, and harmonizing.

Spikenard can be applied neat (without dilution) on adults when used topically on area of concern or to reflex points. It can also be diffused or inhaled directly.

at_spikenard

5 Ways to Use Spikenard Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Try these oil blends in your diffuser:
2. Roll on for Sleep
Spikenard essential oil is also beneficial in helping with insomnia because of its relaxing properties. Here is a good recipe to put in a roll-on bottle to rub on the bottoms of your feet at night when you need a little help falling asleep:

Insomnia Blend:
1 drop Roman chamomile
2 drops lavender
2 drops marjoram
2 drops orange
1 drop tangerine
1 drop ylang ylang
1 drop spikenard
Add oils to a 5 ml roll-on for short-term use or a 10 ml roll-on for daily use. Fill the roll-on the rest of the way with a carrier oil such as fractionated coconut oil, sweet almond oil, or jojoba oil.

All-Natural Deodorant3. Add to Deodorant
Try putting spikenard in your all-natural deodorant. You could even make your own by using this recipe and replace the oils with this blend:
5 drops orange
3 drops juniper berry
2 drops spikenard

4. Add to a Warm Bath
Here is a bath blend that will remind you of being deep in the woodlands:

Relax in the Woodlands Bath:
1 drop spikenard
1 drop vetiver
5 drops cedarwood
10 drops white fir
4 drops cypress
1 cup (240 g) epsom salt
Mix oils in epsom salt, and add 1/4 cup of the mixture to your warm bathwater.

5. Use in a Massage
According to Patricia Davis, spikenard “is a wonderful oil for anybody who is tense or anxious, and has the ability to help people let go of old pain or emotional blocks that they are holding inside. Aromatherapists who work with chakra energy or auric massage would find this a very appropriate oil” (Aromatherapy: An A–Z, p. 301). Try using this blend that includes spikenard for a relaxing massage:

Relaxing Massage Blend:
3 drops neroli
3 drops petitgrain
3 drops marjoram
1 drop spikenard
2 Tbsp. (30 ml) carrier oil (such as Fractionated Coconut Oil, Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, or Jojoba Oil)

To learn more about spikenard essential oil, see the book Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources: Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, p. 110.
Aromatherapy: An A–Z by Patricia Davis.

Essential Oil Spotlight: Petitgrain

Petitgrain essential oil (Citrus aurantium) is obtained from the bitter orange tree. It is distilled from leaves and sometimes the tips of young twigs, but in earlier centuries it was extracted from unripe oranges, picked when they were still green and no bigger than a cherry, hence the French term petit grain, meaning “small grain.” This was uneconomic because in the effort to produce petitgrain essential oil, the crops of mature oranges were reduced drastically. So rather than producing oil from the unripe fruit, producers started distilling oil from the leaves of the tree and kept the oil’s original name. Because of its very pleasing scent, petitgrain has been used extensively in high-quality perfumes and cosmetics.

Petitgrain essential oil contains antibacterial, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, deodorant, and stimulant (for digestive and nervous systems) properties.

It is commonly used for depression, focus, greasy/oily hair, stress, and uplifting one’s mood. This oil may also help with acne, dyspepsia, fatigue, flatulence, greasy hair, insomnia, and excessive perspiration.

Petitgrain essential oil can be applied neat (with no dilution) on adults when used topically on area of concern or reflex points. It can also be diffused or inhaled directly and is generally regarded as safe for internal use (often consumed in small amounts in capsules).

5 Ways To Use Petitgrain Essential Oil

1. Diffuse
Petitgrain is a great oil to diffuse because it has the ability to uplift one’s mood and may help with stress, focus, and depression. Try these blends in your diffuser:

2. Roll on for Sleep
Petitgrain essential oil is also beneficial in helping with insomnia (especially when sleeplessness is caused because of loneliness or stress). Here is a good recipe to put in a roll-on bottle to rub on the bottoms of your feet at night when you need a little help falling asleep:

Sleepy Time with Petitgrain Roll-on Blend:
2 drops lavender
2 drops Roman chamomile
7 drops petitgrain
Add oils to a 5 ml roll-on for short-term use or a 10 ml roll-on for daily use. Fill the roll-on the rest of the way with a carrier oil such as fractionated coconut oil, sweet almond oil, or jojoba oil.

All-Natural Deodorant3. Add to Deodorant
Try putting petitgrain in your all-natural deodorant. You could even make your own using this recipe and replace the oils with this blend:
4 drops lime
4 drops orange
2 drops clove
2 drops petitgrain

4. Add to a Warm Bath
Petitgrain is most known for its ability to help with depression and for supporting the nervous system. It is a good alternative to use in place of bergamot essential oil when needed over a long period of time or when the photosensitive nature of bergamot is a problem (petitgrain essential oil is not a photosensitizer). Try adding petitgrain essential oil to your baths! Just mix the oil with epsom salt before adding to warm bathwater. Here are a few recipes to try:

A Refreshing Calm:
5 drops petitgrain
5 drops ylang ylang
5 drops orange
1/4 cup (60 g) Epsom Salt
Relaxing with Petitgrain:
5 drops petitgrain
5 drops lavender
3 drops fennel
2 drops orange
1/4 cup (60 g) Epsom Salt
Good Morning, Sunshine:
4 drops rosemary
6 drops grapefruit
5 drops petitgrain
1/4 cup (60 g) Epsom Salt

Bath woman

5. Care for Greasy/Oily Skin and Hair
Petitgrain essential oil has many applications in skincare because it helps to reduce over-production of sebum and is a gentle but effective antiseptic. This makes it a good oil for acne or oily dandruff. Just put a few drops in the final rinse after shampooing greasy hair, or apply after washing your face.

To learn more about petitgrain essential oil, see the book Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources: Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, p. 101.
Healing Oils: 500 Formulas for Aromatherapy by Carol Schiller & David Schiller
Aromatherapy: An A–Z by Patricia Davis
Aromatherapy Blends & Remedies by Franzesca Watson

See Modern Essentials™: Youthful Skin

Vibrant, healthy skin isn’t just for the young. With proper care, skin can continue to regenerate itself and have a healthy glow even as you age.

skincare

Pamper yourself by making a skin serum with essential oils that have been shown to hydrate and tighten the skin and reduce the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines:

  • Frankincense
  • Sandalwood
  • Myrrh
  • Helichrysum
  • Cilantro
  • Lavender
  • Sandalwood
  • Geranium

Mix a few drops of your favorite carrier oil such as fractionated coconut oil or jojoba oil, and lightly massage into your skin.

For around the eye area, combine 1 drop of frankincense, 1 drop of lavender, and 1 drop of lemon. Apply gently around the eyes morning and night to soften the appearance of crow’s feet.

To moisturize and replenish the skin all over your body, add 1 drop sandalwood, 1 drop helichrysum, 1 drop lavender, and 1 drop frankincense to 2 tsp. (10 ml) of unscented lotion or coconut oil. Apply generously and often to achieve a healthy, youthful glow.

For more tips and ideas on how essential oils can keep your skin young and healthy, see Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, pp. 190, 338–39.

See Modern Essentials: Essential Oils for Sleep

Lack of sleep can lead to a lowered immune system and depression. In times of stress or illness, it can be difficult to get adequate sleep. Sleeping releases the chemical serotonin, which is necessary to keep the body and mind functioning in a healthy and normal way. Here are some essential oils that have a calming effect on the emotions and the body during those restless nights:

  • lavender
  • bergamot
  • ylang ylang
  • cedarwood
  • geranium
  • vetiver
  • juniper berry
  • frankincense
  • sandalwood
  • orange
  • rose
  • lemongrass
  • clary sage
  • marjoram

For aromatherapy, these oils can be used singly or in a blend. Diffuse them into the air, or inhale directly from the bottle. They are also effective when applied to your hands or a tissue and inhaled.

Always dilute as recommended before applying topically. A few drops on the back of the neck, temples, chest, shoulders, and back will help your body relax. The reflex points on your feet are a good place to apply the oils for optimum calming effects.

Another great way to apply essential oils is to create a massage oil by adding 1–2 drops of essential oil to 1 Tbsp. (15 ml) of fractionated coconut oil. Massage into areas where the body holds tension like the neck, shoulders, back, feet, and hands.

Another way to relieve tension is to take a warm bath just before bedtime. Add 1/4 cup of bath salts, 5 drops of geranium essential oil, and 5 drops of lavender essential oil to warm bathwater, and let it dissolve. The bath salts and essential oils will help to relax your muscles and calm your mind, making it easier to fall asleep at bedtime.

To learn more about how essential oils can help you relax and get restful sleep, see Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils.

Source:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, pp. 238, 339.

The 8th Edition of Modern Essentials™

at_1151_8th

Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils is perfect for anyone wanting to learn about essential oils and their everyday uses. It is the definitive guide, whether you are a new or an experienced essential oil user. This book is a must-have for any essential oil user’s library. Here are a few facts you may not know about this book:

It’s that time of year again when Modern Essentials™ gets an update! With the addition of 48 pages, here’s what’s new in this popular book:

New Design. You will love the stunning new cover, page designs, full-color photographs, descriptive charts, and illustrations. New photos and graphics appear throughout this book as section dividers and to break up some of the text-heavy sections.

Two New Oils. Spikenard and petitgrain essential oils have been added to Modern Essentials™ both in the “Essential Oils” section and throughout the “My Usage Guide” section.

New Spa Products and Supplement. Several new spa products and a new supplement were added to the “Personal Care and Spa” and “Essential Supplements” sections, as well as throughout the “My Usage Guide” section.

New “Simple Solutions.” Over 150 condition-specific recipes, blends, and tips, labeled as “simple solutions,” added throughout the “My Usage Guide” chapter.

Expanded “Essential Living” Chapter. The “Essential Living” section shows how essential oils can be incorporated in a variety of ways to promote a healthy lifestyle. This section now includes new recipes and many new blend ideas in a beautiful new format. Additionally, most home and personal care recipes have been adjusted so they include 15 drops total of an essential oil or blend, and each blend idea totals 15 drops, so each blend can easily be interchanged as desired in a different recipe.

New “Basics of Essential Oils” Chapter. The “Science and Application” section in the 7th Edition has been split into 2 chapters: “The Basics of Essential Oils” and “Essential Oil Science in Depth.” The newly formatted “Basics of Essential Oils” chapter presents the information new and experienced essential oil users need to understand to safely and effectively apply essential oils.

New “Essential Oil Science in Depth” Chapter. This chapter (taken from the “Science and Application” section in previous editions) discusses topics related to the science behind essential oils, including “How Essential Oils Interact with the Body,” “Plants and Essential Oils,” and “Essential Oil Constituents,” among others. The “Essential Oil Science in Depth” chapter enhances knowledge with illustrations and explanations on essential oils, benefits, safety information, and more.

This edition of Modern Essentials™ still includes all the information from previous editions, including the following features:

  • The “My Usage Guide” section offers an easy-to-use format on how essential oils are commonly used to support the body for hundreds of common disorders, like acne, to more serious illnesses, like diabetes. Easy-to-understand definitions follow each medical condition listed in the “My Usage Guide” section.
  • The body systems symbol within the book highlights different body systems affected by the oils.
  • The Balancing Touch Massage Technique found in the “Basics of Essential Oils” section describes a simple yet effective massage technique that uses 8 essential oils and simple hand movements to help combat stress, enhance immune function, decrease inflammation, and balance the autonomic nervous system with the recipient.
  • Illustrated charts display information on topics such as auricular points, reflex hand and foot therapy, and the autonomic nervous system, among others.
  • “Essential Oils” and “Essential Oil Blends” sections feature a “quick facts” box for simple reference on the basics of any oil or blend. Listing of each essential oil and blend includes chemical constituents, historical uses, application suggestions, safety data, and more.
  • Hundreds of research studies are cited as footnote references throughout the book.
  • Sections titled “My Notes on Essential Oils and Blends” feature blank pages for personal observations and reference. These appear after the “Essential Oils,” “Essential Oil Blends,” and “Essential Supplements” sections and at the end of the book.

Get your copy of this popular and newly updated book! Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, as well as the other members of the Modern Essentials™ Family, can be purchased from aromatools.com.

See Modern Essentials: Sports Injuries

sportsBeing active is an important part of a healthy lifestyle. The positive endorphins released during exercise will lift depression, boost energy, and strengthen cardiac function. Increasing muscle mass and strength also helps the body burn fat and build endurance. It’s important to keep those muscles and connective tissues that make movement possible healthy.

Overuse of a muscle in repeated motion, tension, stress, strain, and injury can cause discomfort and pain during muscle movement. When an injury takes place as a result of exercise or sports, there are several essential oils that can be useful in the healing process. Here are some oils you can try the next time you experience a sports-related injury.

Aches and Pains

  • Birch
  • Clove
  • Peppermint
  • Chamomile
  • Ginger
  • Lavender
Bruises

  • Helichrysum
  • Geranium
  • Fennel
  • Lavender
Cartilage Injury

  • Birch
  • Wintergreen
  • Marjoram
  • Lemongrass
  • White fir
  • Peppermint
Cramps and
Charley Horses

  • Lemongrass
    with peppermint
  • Marjoram
  • Rosemary
  • Basil
  • Thyme
  • Vetiver
  • Roman chamomile
  • Cypress
  • Grapefruit
  • Clary sage
  • Lavender
Sprains

  • Marjoram
  • Lemongrass
  • White fir
  • Helichrysum
  • Rosemary
  • Thyme
  • Vetiver
  • Eucalyptus
  • Clove
  • Ginger
  • Lavender
Tendinitis

  • Marjoram
  • Lavender

Tension and Stiffness

  • Marjoram
  • Peppermint
  • Helichrysum
  • Juniper berry
  • Lavender
  • Roman chamomile

Some injuries can be avoided by stretching before exercise and getting plenty of hydration during and after working out or playing sports. But sometimes injuries happen no matter how careful we are. Essential oils applied with a roller bottle, mixed in a balm, or blended for massage can help accelerate the healing process.

Sources:
Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils, 8th Edition, pp. 289, 303–306.

The Art of Roller Bottle Blending

Blending essential oils is definitely an art that takes practice to master, but even beginners can create some great blends. In this article, we will discuss the basics of blending so you have a better idea about where to begin. Our focus today will be on creating blends in roll-on bottles.

Why use roll-on bottles?

Roll-on bottles, often called roller bottles, are useful for the following reasons:

  1. You can use them to create blends customized to your needs.
  2. Your blends can be pre-diluted and ready for use.
  3. They make it easy to apply blends without creating a mess.
  4. They can be conveniently carried on your person or in a bag to use whenever you need them.

What carrier oil should I use to dilute the essential oil in a roll-on bottle?

Some of the most common carrier oils to use for diluting essential oils are Fractionated Coconut Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, and Jojoba Oil.

What are recommended dilution ratios?

Dilution amounts can vary based on many factors, including the a person’s weight, skin sensitivity, health issues, oils being used, or the length of time they are used. It is important to note that these recommendations are simply guidelines, not absolute rules, and are fairly conservative. It is always better to start out with a greater dilution and increase the essential oil drops as needed.

What oils should I use?

You will want to use oils that are of therapeutic quality and safe to apply topically to the skin. The specific oils that you choose should be based on what you want to accomplish with the roll-on blend. For example, if you want to create a relaxing essential oil blend, you will want to choose essential oils that help relax or promote calmness.

How do I create my own blends?

Because this may seem a little complicated, we’ll break it down into a few different steps.

Step 1: Look Up Essential Oils for Desired Result

First, you will need to figure out what you want the essential oil blend to do. Once you figure that out, look up those properties in Modern Essentials. For example, let’s say you want to create a relaxing blend to help promote sleep. You could look up “Relaxation,” “Calming—Sedative,” and “Sleep” in Modern Essentials™ and come up with these lists of essential oils:

Relaxation:

  • Lavender
  • Ylang Ylang
  • Lemon
  • Massage Blend
  • Roman Chamomile
  • Geranium
  • Frankincense
  • Sandalwood
  • Clary Sage
Calming—Sedative:

  • Lavender
  • Calming Blend
  • Invigorating Blend
  • Bergamot
  • Ylang Ylang
  • Cedarwood
  • Geranium
  • Vetiver
  • Juniper Berry
  • Frankincense
  • Sandalwood
  • Orange
  • Rose
  • Lemongrass
  • Clary Sage
  • Marjoram
Sleep:

  • Lavender
  • Calming Blend
  • Roman Chamomile
  • Marjoram

Note: The oils in red are the primary recommendations, the oils in orange are the secondary recommendations, and the oils in green are other recommendations. When creating our blend, we may want to choose from the oils in red first, but it is still a good idea to do the next step with the orange and green recommendations too in case we decide to use some of them in order to create a more balanced blend.

Step 2: Figure Out The Essential Oils’ Classifications and Notes

This is the hardest part, especially for beginners. Now that we have our list of essential oils, we need to organize them based on their classifications and notes. “It is important to understand that the order with which the oils are blended is key to maintaining the desired therapeutic properties in a synergistic blend. An alteration in the sequence of adding selected oils to a blend may change the chemical properties, the fragrance, and thus, the desired results” (Modern Essentials™, p. 62). In general, oils that are from the same botanical family usually blend well, and oils with similar constituents also mix well.

Using the Single Essential Oils section of Modern Essentials™, you can look up the oils in the lists above and write down their “Blend Classification” and “Odor” (or note type).

The above list of essential oils can be divided into the following classifications (and should be added to the blend in the order described):

  • 1st—The personifier (1–5% of blend) oils have very sharp, strong, and long-lasting fragrances. They also have dominant properties with strong therapeutic action. (ylang ylang, Roman chamomile, clary sage, orange, rose)
  • 2nd—The enhancer (50–80% of blend) oil should be the predominant oil, as it serves to enhance the properties of the other oils in the blend. Its fragrance is not as sharp as the personifier’s and is usually of shorter duration. (lavender, lemon, bergamot, geranium, cedarwood, marjoram, frankincense, sandalwood, orange, rose, lemongrass)
  • 3rd—The equalizer (10–15% of blend) oils create balance and synergy among the oils contained in the blend. Their fragrance is also not as sharp as the personifier’s and is of a shorter duration. (lavender, bergamot, geranium, cedarwood, marjoram, frankincense, juniper berry, rose, lemongrass)
  • 4th—The modifier (4–8% of blend) oils have a mild and short fragrance. These oils add harmony to the blend. (lavender, ylang ylang, lemon, bergamot, sandalwood, rose)

You will also want to categorize the essential oils according to their note:

  • Top note essential oils are the fastest evaporating oils and the most immediately noticeable scents in a perfume. They diffuse quickly and tend to be light, crisp, and penetrating. (lemon, bergamot, orange, lemongrass)
  • Middle note essential oils, also called heart notes, should make up the main body of the blend. They soften and round out the fragrance to harmonize the mixture. (lavender, ylang ylang, Roman chamomile, geranium, marjoram, juniper berry, clary sage, rose)
  • Base note essential oils are usually not recognized until several minutes after application. Base note fragrances tend to become more pleasant over time and, when used in proper proportions, can give depth to the blend. (ylang ylang, cedarwood, frankincense, vetiver, sandalwood, clary sage, rose)

Step 3: Choose Your Essential Oils and Amounts to Use

It is recommended for beginners to start out with only 3–4 oils including a top note, a middle note, and a base note. As you get more comfortable with blending, you can experiment with adding more essential oils to your blends.

So, for your relaxing blend, you could use lemon for your top note; Roman chamomile and lavender for your middle notes; and cedarwood for your base note. This will also give you a personifier (Roman chamomile), an enhancer (lavender), an equalizer (cedarwood), and a modifier (lemon).

This roll-on recipe uses a 10% dilution, which is 20 drops of essential oil for a 10 ml roll-on bottle. This is a possible formula:

Relax to Sleep Roll-on Blend

  • Servings: Yield=10 ml Roll-on
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. Add essential oils in order to the roll-on bottle. Fill the rest of the bottle up with carrier oil. Insert the roller ball, and screw on lid.
  2. To use, roll oil on feet, neck, or wrists to help promote relaxation and sleep.

Of course, you don’t have to be really strict with these formulas or ratios since they are just a guideline. Besides, there are many differing opinions on how to blend and the correct ratios to use, and you may not have all the essential oils needed to fill each of the above categories. Your intuition and nose may prove to be most useful in learning how to create your own blends. As you experiment, start out with smaller quantities (such as 10–20 drops total) so you aren’t wasting a lot of oil if you end up not liking the result.

6 Roll-on Blend Recipes

These recipes are all designed to be a 10% dilution ratio in a 10 ml roll-on bottle, so adjust the recipes for lesser or greater dilution as needed. If you are using a 5 ml roll-on bottle, cut the recipes in half or make the recipe in a separate bottle and only put 10 drops in the roll-on bottle.

Instructions:

Add the drops in order to a 10 ml roll-on bottle. Fill the rest of the bottle up with a carrier oil. Let sit overnight, if possible, to allow the oils to blend fully.

Note: We included some adjustments to recipes in parentheses. If adjustments aren’t noted for every oil, just include the recommended drops. You can also make the blend in a separate bottle (such as these sample bottles) and then place the number of drops needed to achieve the desired dilution.

Recipes:

Relax to Sleep:
1 drop Roman chamomile
14 drops lavender (6 drops for children)
3 drops cedarwood (2 drops for children)
2 drops lemon (1 drop for children)
Happiness:
5 drops orange
10 drops lemon
3 drops lavender
2 drops ylang ylang
Owie Stick:
1 drop helichrysum
15 drops lavender (7 drops for children)
3 drops melaleuca (1 drop for children)
1 drop frankincense
Digestive Support:
2 drops ginger
4 drops peppermint
5 drops lavender (2 drops for children)
5 drops lemon (1 drop for children)
4 drops fennel (1 drop for children)
Muscle Soother:
2 drops peppermint
4 drops birch
10 drops marjoram
3 drops lemongrass
1 drop lavender
Immune Booster:
1 drop clove
8 drops oregano (4 drops for daily use)
6 drops melaleuca (2 drops for daily use)
2 drops rosemary (1 drop for daily use)
2 drops frankincense (1 drop for daily use)
1 drop lemon

Please comment below and share with us any roll-on recipes that you have tried and enjoyed! We would love to learn from your experiences!