How to Hold a Make & Take Class

Make-and-take classes are surging in popularity because they are easy to hold, give your attendees hands-on experience, and allow your guests to leave with something containing essential oils to use at home. Essential oils often sell themselves if they can be introduced with adequate information and something simple for your new contact to try.

at_eo_mt_class_studentMake-and-take classes (and other essential oil classes, for that matter) can seem quite daunting, but they don’t have to be! In this post, we will show you a simple outline that can be adapted to whatever make-and-take class you choose to do.

When planning for a class, you will need to do the following:

  1. Select a date, time, and location. Keep in mind who you want to attend when deciding these things, but don’t get caught up in trying to make it work for everyone—you can always hold more than one of the same class.
  2. Invite people, and remind them about it a week before and the day before the class.
  3. Order your materials. AromaTools has a lot of ingredients and containers that are commonly used for essential oil DIY projects. AromaTools also offers a free event program and additional resources to help you with your classes. Click here for more information.
  4. Gather essential oils and other needed materials. Print any instructions, handouts, and labels as needed.at_eo_mt_class_supplies
  5. Prepare a short lesson. The length of your lesson can depend on how much time it will take for your make-and-take project. If you try to keep your lesson to less than 30 minutes, you should have enough time for questions and your make-and-take project. Here are a few ideas for lesson topics:
    • the basics of essential oils;
    • how essential oils support a specific body system;
    • the most common essential oils and how to use them;
    • essential oils for [fill in the blank] (children, pregnancy, animals, emotions, cooking, cleaning, weight loss, exercising, basic first aid, women, romance, winter wellness, etc.).

    Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils can be a great resource in helping you plan your lesson.at_me8_lifestyle2

  6. Hold your class. Remember to keep it simple: give your short lesson; answer questions; show how to do the make-and-take project; then let your guests do their project, mingle, eat refreshments, and leave.
  7. Follow up. If you were introducing anyone to essential oils through your class, make sure to contact them later that week and answer any further questions they have or invite them to another class later.

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These are a few things you will need to consider when preparing for your class:

  • Decide if you want to discuss any business opportunities or keep the lesson education-based. If you do want to market a specific essential oil company, be careful not to make any health claims about the essential oils; speaking generally about health benefits is better. You can always give your class attendees an “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet or refer them to other information that provides more specific uses for essential oils.
  • Decide if and how you want to charge for the make-and-take project. Some charge a flat fee for their classes; others give their attendees 1 free item and charge for extras; and some provide (or charge for) materials but not the essential oils.
  • Depending on the make-and-take item, you may want to prepare a sample ahead of time so you can show the finished product.
  • Figure out how to set up your make-and-take station(s). Make sure to have at least one station and arrange it so the attendees can either all make the project at the same time or walk down a line to put together their item. Of course, the way you set this up depends on the number of attendees, the project, the supplies you have on hand, etc.
  • It’s a good idea to have printed instructions of how to make the item so your attendees can refer to it as they make their product and be able to take it home with them so they can make more if desired. You may even want to provide labels so your attendees can remember what they made and what they can do with it after the class.
  • Other optional suggestions include holding a drawing to get contact information, offering refreshments, and providing additional handouts or prizes.

If you would like some specific class ideas, check out our Essential Oil Class Ideas category. Also, feel free to browse our Essential Ideas category for more make-and-take class projects and topics:

Do you have any tips for holding an essential oil make-and-take class? Let us know in the comments below! 

Backpack Essentials for Teachers

If you are a teacher getting ready for the beginning of school, don’t forget to include essential oils in your preparations. There are many great ways that essential oils can help you and your students throughout the school day. We discussed some of these in our post “Backpack Essentials for Students,” but we would like to discuss other ways a teacher can use essential oils in the classroom.

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Diffusing Essential Oils

Have you ever felt the nervous energy when a test is about to begin? Do you have students that have a really hard time focusing on what is being discussed? Do you teach early-morning or late-afternoon classes and see your students falling asleep at their desks? If you have experienced any of these situations, your classroom may benefit from diffusing essential oils!

Here are a few diffuser blends we have put together that you can diffuse in your classroom:

Morning Sunshine:
2 drops orange
2 drops peppermint
2 drops lime
Calm Down:
5 drops lavender
3 drops Roman chamomile
Boosting Energy:
3 drops peppermint
2 drops rosemary
2 drops grapefruit
Mental Clarity:
3 drops lemon
1 drop basil
1 drop rosemary
1 drop frankincense
Anxiety Helper:
4 drops lavender
2 drops lemon
2 drops ylang ylang
Testing Time:
3 drops peppermint
3 drops rosemary
2 drops lemon

If you find that you like these diffuser blends, it might be a good idea to make a larger batch of each diffuser blend, store them in new bottles, and label them so they are easy to add to your diffuser.

Some school districts have restrictions on diffusers that plug into the wall. If this is the case at your school, you may want to consider a diffuser that is battery operated or can be connected to a USB power bank or computer. These are the options AromaTools® carries that fall in this category:

Keeping Germs at Bay

Anytime a group of people gather in a room, especially 5 days a week, there are bound to be germs aplenty being passed around. Essential oils can be beneficial for keeping these germs at bay and maintaining a clean environment. Remember, healthy kids show up to class and are more likely to pay attention. We have put together a few cleaning sprays that would be useful in keeping a classroom clean: Natural Cleaning Sprays.

Essential oils can also help clean the air. One study found that a blend of lemongrass and geranium oils diffused into the air was able to reduce airborne bacteria in an office by 89%.1 Try misting a antibacterial blend of essential oils around your classroom before and after classes each day. In her book Aromatherapy for the Healthy Child, aromatherapist Valerie Ann Worwood provides a recipe for making an anti-infectious room spray. We have included her recipe below.

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Anti-Infectious Room Spray

  • Servings: Yield=4 oz. (120 ml)
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

  • 20 drops thyme essential oil
  • 5 drops cinnamon essential oil
  • 5 drops clove essential oil
  • 10 drops melaleuca essential oil
  • 10 drops lemon essential oil
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) pure alcohol (such as vodka)
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) distilled water, divided
  • Two 4 oz. glass spray bottles

Instructions:

  1. Combine essential oils and alcohol into one of the glass spray bottles. Screw lid on, and shake to combine.
  2. Transfer half of the mixture to the other spray bottle. Add 1/4 cup (60 ml) distilled water to each spray bottle. Screw lids on, and shake each bottle to help combine the liquid.
  3. Allow to sit for 24 hours before use.
  4. To use, simply mist around the room as needed.

Source: Aromatherapy for the Healthy Child by Valerie Ann Worwood, p. 37.

Ask Permission

Keep in mind that some schools have bans on perfumes or fragrances, so you may need to get specific permission from your principal or administrator to use essential oils in the classroom. It is also a good idea to get permission from the parents of your students so they know you are using essential oils around their children.

Essential Oil DIY Products for Teachers

We also wanted to include a list of essential oil products that may be useful for a teacher to keep in the desk. And if you want some essential oil craft ideas to use with children, click here.

1. A. L. Doran, W. E. Morden, K. Dunn, and V. Edwards-Jones, “Vapour-Phase Activities of Essential Oils against Antibiotic Sensitive and Resistant Bacteria including MRSA,” Letters in Applied Microbiology 48, no. 4 (April 2009): 387–92.