“Oils to the Rescue” First Aid Kit and Coconut Oil Soothing Balm

Do you have a first aid kit in your home or car? First aid kits are great to have on hand when a little emergency presents itself. But wouldn’t you want to have your essential oils available too? The Oils to the Rescue First Aid Kit combines the basic supplies you need in a standard first aid kit. It also allows space for adding essential oils and customized products that you’ve prepared for common ailments and injuries.

Recommended Essential Oils

If you aren’t sure which oils to include in your kit, try these emergency essential oils:

Cuts and Scrapes
Lavender
Frankincense
Melaleuca
Peppermint
Insect Bites and Stings
Lavender
Melaleuca
Protective Blend
Cleansing Blend (backs ticks out)
Peppermint
Burns
Lavender
Burn Spray
(Spray bottle, water,
Lavender, Peppermint,
Melaleuca)
Headaches
Peppermint
Soothing Blend
Frankincense
Seasonal Discomforts
Lemon
Lavender
Peppermint
Digestive Issues
Digestive Blend
Peppermint
Ginger
Sprains, Strains,
& Splinters

Peppermint
Soothing Blend
Lavender
Protective Blend

You can purchase a card with this information to keep in your kit. Then you’ll know what to do with the oils when an emergency arises.


The Oils to the Rescue First Aid Kit includes 4 large slots that fit 2 oz. size bottles and 6 small slots that fit 15 ml essential oil bottles.

Recommended Additional First Aid Items

Other suggestions of helpful products:

First Aid Coconut Oil Soothing Balm Recipe

This soothing balm is specially formulated to have antiseptic, antimicrobial, analgesic (pain-relieving), and antibacterial properties. It soothes and moisturizes the skin and works well for all first aid injuries, including children’s boo-boos.

This recipe yields 6 oz. So, if you use 2 oz. salve containers, you can keep one at home, take one on-the-go, and give one to a friend.  Or, you could host a make & take class and send your attendees home with their own 1/4 oz. salve jar of balm.

First Aid Coconut Oil Soothing Balm

  • Servings: Yield=6 oz.
  • Time: 10 minutes active
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Melt the beeswax in a double boiler.
  2. Once the beeswax is melted, add the coconut oil. Remove from heat when melted, and add the melaleuca, frankincense, and lavender essential oils.
  3. Slowly add witch hazel to the mixture, using a hand blender to combine. Blend on high for a few seconds until well incorporated.
  4. Spoon the cooled cream into sealable glass containers. The salve is ready to use. It should go on smooth, and you can expect a waxy, balm-like texture. To avoid contaminating the cream with stray bacteria, try not to touch it directly with your hands. Instead, use a cotton swab or clean tissue to apply it to a wound.

What would you include in your first aid kit? Comment below.

Essential Oils for Cut Flowers

Who doesn’t love having decorative spring flowers to brighten their home? The only downside to bringing cut flowers inside is that they don’t seem to last very long. We have been experimenting with cut flowers, and we found that adding a drop of melaleuca to the water helps them last longer!

Useful tips when caring for cut flowers:

  • Cut the stems of the flowers at an angle. This allows the flower to soak up nutrients more easily.
  • Add a drop of melaleuca essential oil to a flower water mix (see recipe below). The melaleuca helps kill bacteria that leads to mold growth.
  • Use filtered water to reduce the amount of chlorine and other minerals or chemicals often found in tap water. These substances diminish plant health.
  • Change flower water and recut flower stems (just a tiny bit) every 2–3 days. A cut flower stem eventually seals up, preventing nutrient assimilation. So cutting the stems and adding more nutrients helps preserve the flowers.
  • Keep cut flowers away from direct heat and light (if possible).

Decorative Flower Vases

  • Time: 5 minutes active
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Stir together sugar and melaleuca in a glass measuring cup.
  2. Add apple cider vinegar and filtered water. Mix well until sugar is dissolved.
  3. Add the water mixture to bottles or clear plastic tubes.
  4. Cut flower stems at an angle a little longer than the desired length. Arrange flowers in the bottles or tubes.
  5. Change flower water and cut stems just a little bit every 2–3 days.

Extra Ideas:

  • Clear plastic tubes make great single flower vases. You can easily decorate them by gluing ribbon, buttons, or other items to the outside.
  • If you are using cut flowers for an event—essential oil class, wedding reception, or party—you may want to use a floral essential oil instead of melaleuca to enhance the scent of your decoration. Then, when you are ready to display your flowers elsewhere (after 2+ days), add melaleuca essential oil to the replacement water. Some floral oils include lavender, ylang ylang, geranium, clary sage, Roman chamomile, jasmine, and rose.

Flower arrangements in glass bottles or clear plastic tubes make great centerpieces and decorations for essential oil classes!

Keys to Successful Essential Oil Classes (Including 50+ Class Ideas)

Teaching classes about essential oils can be a great way to share your love for essential oils with others—and it can be a great way to introduce others to essential oils and possibly increase sales if you’re a distributor.

Keys to a Successful Class

According to many people who have both taught and participated in essential oil classes, there are 3 main keys to giving a successful class:

  1. Gain knowledge and experience about what you are teaching.
  2. Keep your class focused on a specific, simple goal.
  3. Plan to allow the class members an opportunity to interact—both with you and with the oils.

Here are a few other things to keep in mind:

  • Keep it simple—don’t try to teach everything at once.
  • Love and have fun with what you are doing.
  • Share your own personal experiences.
  • Try to connect with your attendees by interacting with them.
  • Let people experience the essential oils as much as possible.
  • Have books, handouts, and other information available for those who would like to learn more.
  • Know (and be prepared to act on) all pertinent safety information for any essential oil you use during class.
  • Don’t try to fake what you don’t know.

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Possible Class Ideas

While there are many different subjects that can be taught about essential oils and aromatherapy, it is best to pick an area that intrigues or interests you. This will help ensure that you are enthusiastic about the subject, which will help those in your class feel enthusiastic as well. Some of the most loved classes are make-and-take classes because the attendees are able to take something home with them to help them experience the essential oils for themselves. While the following list is in no way comprehensive, it is a great starting point and may help you generate some new ideas.

Introduction to Aromatherapy/Essential Oils
A Simple Introductory Essential Oil Class Idea
Essential Oils 101
Class Idea: Intro to Modern Essentials Scavenger Hunt
Introduction to Modern Essentials: A Mini Textbook for Essential Oil Classes
Essential Health and Wellness with Modern Essentials
Single Essential Oils (use these Essential Oil Spotlights)
Most Commonly Used Essential Oils
Essential Oil Application
Aromatic Application
Topical Application
Internal Application
Essential Oil Safety
How Essential Oils Interact with the Body
Essential Oil Troubleshooting
Essential Oil Constituents
How Essential Oils Are Made
History of Essential Oils
Oils of the Bible
Everyday Uses for Essential Oils
Aromatherapy First Aid
Emergency Oils
Take the Urgency Out of Emergency
Relaxing with Essential Oils
Relaxation Gift Ideas for Women
Essential Oils for Sleep
Essential Oils for a Better Night’s Sleep
Essential Oils for Sleep
Seasonal Aromatherapy
Essential Oils for Romance
5 Perfect Summer Make & Take Class Ideas
Class Idea: Make & Take Autumn Room Sprays
Class Idea: Ribbon Christmas Tree Diffusers
Essential Oils for the Cold and Flu Season
’Tis the Season for Sickness
Stay Healthy This Winter Season
Essential Oils for Pain Management
Aromatherapy at the Office
Diffusing Essential Oils
Which Diffuser Is the Best? Diffusion Methods and Comparison Charts
Diffuser Blends
Diffuser Blends on a Budget
How to Clean Your Diffuser (including Diffuser Cleaning Spray)
35 Aromatherapy Jewelry Blends
Aromatherapy and the Emotions
Essential Oils for Mental Health
Chart Your Own Course with Emotional Aromatherapy
Muscle Testing and Essential Oils for Emotional Healing
Cooking with Essential Oils – FAQs and Tips
Cleaning with Essential Oils
Make & Take Class Idea: Natural Cleaning Sprays
Produce Cleaning Spray
Homemade Natural Dishwashing Soap
Disinfecting with Essential Oils
Essential Oil Antioxidants
Essential Oil Crafts
Make & Take Class Idea: Essential Oil Milk Bath Fizzers
Class Idea: Make & Take Aromatherapy Clay Jewelry
Aromatherapy Gift Ideas
Bath Salts
Sugar Scrubbies
Brown Sugar Lip Scrub
Solid Perfume Locket
Hand Sanitizer
Lip Balm
Soap Making with Essential Oils
Bath Pals Soap for Kids
Peppermint Candy Soap
Foaming Hand Soap
Lotion Making with Essential Oils
Lotions and Potions
Simply Luxurious Moisturizing Lotion
Hand and Foot Salve
Lotion Bars
Aromatherapy and Beauty
Youthful Skin
DIY Spa with Essential Oils
Class Idea: Spa Night
Aromatherapy and Massage
Essential Oils for Pregnancy and Childbirth
Essential Oils for Pregnancy
Birth Kit Essentials
Essential Oils and Fitness
Essential Oils for Sports Injuries
Yoga Mat Cleaning Spray
Essential Oils and Addiction
Essential Oils and the Road to Addiction Recovery
How to Use Complementary Therapies within Your Addiction Treatment
The Art of Roller Bottle Blending
Essential Oils and Gardening
Garden Spray
Essential Oils for Pest Control
Repelling Bugs and Insects
Soothing Insect Bites and Stings
Essential Oils for Animal Care
Essential Oils for Travel
Outdoor Travel Tips
Essential Oils for Car Travel
Essential Oils in the Classroom
Backpack Essentials for Teachers
Backpack Essentials for Students
Back to School Tips
Aromatherapy and Learning Disabilities

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Class Tips

How to Teach with Modern Essentials
Introduction to Modern Essentials™: A Mini Textbook for Essential Oil Classes
How to Hold a Make & Take Class
Build Your Business with Modern Essentials Living
Essential Oil Class Decoration Idea

Lesson Resources

Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils
Modern Essentials Living
Educational Resources at AromaTools®
Marketing Resources at AromaTools®

Cooking Class Ideas or Refreshments

All of the cooking recipes on this blog use essential oils, and many could easily be used to teach a cooking class or as refreshments. These are a few of our favorite recipes to use in classes:

Do you have a class idea that has been successful for you? Would you like to share your ideas with us? Just fill out the form below!

“Introduction to Modern Essentials™”: A Mini Textbook for Essential Oil Classes

This year, we introduce our newest edition of the “Introduction to Modern Essentials” booklet. We’ve updated this booklet to include a lot of fantastic information and recipes to make this booklet the best mini textbook for your essential oil classes!
A great way to approach these classes is to keep them focused on educating people about essential oils, but allow individuals to experience and use the oils as part of each class.

At the end of each class, invite those who would like to know more about your chosen brand of pure, therapeutic-grade oils to come talk to you after class or at a separate meeting. These meetings are great opportunities to share with others why you made the choice to naturally support the health of yourself and your family with essential oils.

Class Ideas

Essential Oils 101
Use the first few pages of this booklet to introduce individuals to essential oils and why they are being used by millions of people around the world as a natural way to
support health. This idea can be used on its own or combined with a make-and-take idea.

Scavenger Hunt
Doing this scavenger hunt activity can not only help bring some fun to your class and make it memorable, but it also gives your students a reason to look through the “Introduction to Modern Essentials” booklet. As they look through it and find the answers to the questions, they will learn so much about the essential oils and what the oils can do for specific conditions. They will also learn how they can use the booklet to find answers to their own questions. This activity can be used as a class idea on its own, or it can be added to another class idea as a bonus activity.

Aromatherapy Make & Take Class
Use the information on the diffusing pages to teach how the natural aromas of essential oils can affect the mind and emotions. Allow individuals to sample and make their favorite blend from the “Diffuser Blend Recipes” pages. Add their blend to water in a mini spray bottle for a take-home room and linen spray. An emulsifier (optional) will help distribute the essential oil evenly throughout the water.

Roll-On Balms
Use the information on the “Roll-On Blend Recipes” pages to teach about topical application of essential oils, and allow individuals to make their own natural roll-ons in mini roll-on bottles to take home with them. You can find roll-on bottles and carrier oils at aromatools.com.

Relaxing with Massage Oils
Use the information on the “Using Essential Oils—Applying on Location” and “Using Essential Oils—Massage” pages to teach about massage and topical application of essential oils. Allow individuals to use the “Massage Oil Recipes” to make their own natural massage oils in small bottles to take home with them. You can find small bottles (such as a 1/2 oz. or 1 oz. plastic bottle) and carrier oils at aromatools.com.

Essential Oil–Enhanced Baths
Use the information on the diffusing pages to teach how the natural aromas of essential oils can affect the mind and emotions. Allow individuals to sample and make their favorite blend of bath salts from the “Bath Salts Recipes” page. Have them place their scented bath salts in a jar to take home with them. You can find jars and epsom salt at aromatools.com.

icecream

Gourmet Ice Cream Chef Competition
Use the pages on cooking with essential oils to teach about how to use pure, therapeutic-grade essential oils in cooking. Give everyone 1 cup (240 ml) cream and 2 Tbsp. (25 g) sugar, or substitute your own favorite sweetener and sweeten to taste. Allow class members to create their own naturally flavored ice cream base using essential oils. Since only a small amount (a drop or less) of essential oil is needed, give each guest a small bottle to blend their essential oil “flavor profile” in, and then dispense a drop or less of the blend from the bottle (use a toothpick if less is needed).

Place the base in a quart-sized (1 L) zip-top bag, and seal the bag. Place that bag inside a gallon-sized (4 L) zip-top bag filled with ice and 1/2 cup (250 g) of rock salt. Shake until the cream has frozen (about 10–15 minutes). Use small spoons to allow everyone to taste the creations, and award prizes based on best tasting or most daring (black pepper ice cream, anyone?). You could also add another dimension by adding natural vanilla bean to the flavor mix!

Winter Wellness with Essential Oils
Using the Personal Usage Guide section, lead the members of the class through various ailments that often occur during the winter time (such as cold sores, common colds, congestion, coughs, earache, fever, etc.) Allow individuals to make a cough relief roll-on by using the blend recipe found under “Coughs” or an immune support roll-on by using the blend recipe found under “Colds.” Jojoba oil and roll-on bottles can be found at aromatools.com.

Hot-Chocolate-SocialHot Chocolate Social
Provide hot chocolate and various hot chocolate toppings, such as whipped cream, crushed candy canes, marshmallows, and chocolate chips. Also provide various essential oils to add to the hot chocolate. Peppermint, orange, cinnamon, cassia, and cardamom essential oil all make great additions to hot chocolate. Instruct guests to just dip a toothpick in the oil and then swish the toothpick around in their hot chocolate. Click here for a great hot chocolate recipe.

Once everyone has helped themselves to hot chocolate and is sitting comfortably, this is a great time to share information about essential oils. You could focus on the health benefits of the oils you offered as hot chocolate mix-ins, provide basic introductory information about essential oils, discuss essential oils for winter wellness, or talk about cooking with essential oils.

Enhance Emotional Well-Being with Essential Oils
Use the diffusing pages and the “Emotions and Essential Oils” pages to teach how the natural aromas of essential oils can affect the mind and emotions. Lead the members of the class through various mental and emotional conditions found in the Personal Usage Guide section such as anxiety, calming, concentration, depression, grief/sorrow, memory, mental fatigue, relaxing, shock, stress, and uplifting. Allow individuals to smell the various oils or oil blends for emotional well-being, and invite them to create their own nasal inhaler using 1–3 oils (for a total of 5–8 drops) to take home with them.

If you have a great class idea that others can do with this booklet, please share it with us!

Class Idea: Ribbon Christmas Tree Diffusers

These Ribbon Christmas Tree Diffusers are simple to make and incredibly adorable! Hang one up in your car as a diffuser, on your Christmas tree as an ornament, or anywhere else you want to decorate and add a little holiday scent. Gifting one of these is also a great way to introduce a friend to essential oils.

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Use This Craft in a Make & Take Class

These Ribbon Christmas Tree Diffusers also make a fun make-and-take project at an essential oil class! Just start with a short lesson about essential oils, and then mingle with your guests as they make their own Ribbon Christmas Tree Diffusers.

Here are the items you will need from AromaTools®:

Other items you’ll need to gather:

  • Printed instructions
  • Ribbon
  • Rulers
  • Scissors
  • Markers
  • Beads
  • Thread or thin elastic string
  • Needles (want to make sure your string can fit through your needles.)
  • Clear fingernail polish (or other fray-stopping glue)
  • Essential oils (such as a Christmas blend or a few single essential oils that your guests can make their own blend with)
  • Distilled water

Depending on the number of people attending your class, you can set this up in the following stations:

  • Materials Station. This station should include various types of ribbon, rulers or another way to measure out the ribbon, scissors, and a variety of beads (you’ll need small beads to help tie off the string and larger beads to use as the tree trunk). Every ribbon tree requires 2 small beads and 10 larger beads. Make sure to include a list of materials needed.
  • Ribbon Tree Assembly Station(s). Have markers, rulers, elastic string, scissors, needles, and clear nail polish at this station with instructions for making the Ribbon Trees.
  • Essential Oil Station. This is where your guests can make their own essential oil spray. You’ll need the 15 ml spray bottles, vegetable glycerin, essential oils, and distilled water with instructions for making the sprays. If you have a holiday-scented essential oil blend, it would be easy to just offer that. If not, you can offer a few single essential oils and recipes for your guests to make their own holiday-scented blend. Here are a couple holiday blends you can try: Holiday Diffuser Blends, Citrus Spice Diffuser Blend, Autumn-Scented Essential Oil Blends.

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Ribbon Christmas Tree Diffuser

  • Servings: 1
  • Time: 10–15 minutes active
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Ribbon Trees:

  • Ribbon
  • Rulers
  • Scissors
  • Permanent marker
  • Beads
  • Thread or thin elastic string
  • Needles (make sure your string can fit through your needles)
  • Clear fingernail polish (or other fray-stopping glue)

Essential Oil Spray:

Instructions:

  1. Cut a piece of ribbon 19″ (48 cm) long. Use a marker to place a small dot in the center of the ribbon 2″ (5 cm) from one end of the ribbon to mark your starting point. From this point, make additional marks along the ribbon, spacing them apart at these increments: 2 3/4″ (7 cm), 2 1/2″ (6.5 cm), 2 1/4″ (6 cm), 2″ (5.5 cm), 1 3/4″ (5 cm), 1 1/2″ (4.5 cm), 1 1/4″ (4 cm), 1″ (3.5 cm), etc. (the spaces between the marks should gradually get smaller by a 1/4″ [.5 cm] as you move down the ribbon).at_rct_ribbon
  2. Select your beads. You’ll need 2 small beads to secure the ends and 10 larger beads for the “trunk” of the tree.
  3. Cut a piece of thread/string about 30″ (76 cm) long (you’ll need about 10–12″ [25.5–30.5 cm] for the tree and extra for the loop at the top). Thread your needle, and tie the ends of the string together.at_rct_beads
  4. Put your needle through the ribbon at the starting point (the mark 2″ [5 cm] from the end), then through a large bead, then through a small bead; continue threading around the small bead, back through the large bead, and back through the ribbon at the same mark. This secures the bottom of the tree. Now put the needle through another large bead, through the ribbon at the next mark, through another large bead, through the ribbon at the 3rd mark, and repeat until all the large beads are gone. After the last bead is threaded, put the needle through the small bead, then around the small bead, back through the large bead, and back through the last mark on the ribbon. Tie a knot, then go back up through the ribbon, large bead, and small bead. Tie another knot a 2–4″ (5–10 cm) above the tree (or however big you want your hanging loop to be), and cut the thread.at_rct_assembly
  5. Finish by cutting the ribbon ends to where you think it looks good, and apply clear nail polish or glue to the ends to help prevent fraying.at_rct_finishing
  6. Make an essential oil spray by placing 1/4 tsp. (1.5 ml) vegetable glycerin in the 15 ml bottle. Add 4–6 drops of essential oil. Fill the rest with distilled water, and screw on the spray top. Shake to combine.
  7. To use, spray your essential oil spray on the ribbon tree, and hang wherever you desire. Refresh the scent by spraying the tree again with more of the essential oil spray.at_rct_sprayingeo

How to Hold a Make & Take Class

Make-and-take classes are surging in popularity because they are easy to hold, give your attendees hands-on experience, and allow your guests to leave with something containing essential oils to use at home. Essential oils often sell themselves if they can be introduced with adequate information and something simple for your new contact to try.

at_eo_mt_class_studentMake-and-take classes (and other essential oil classes, for that matter) can seem quite daunting, but they don’t have to be! In this post, we will show you a simple outline that can be adapted to whatever make-and-take class you choose to do.

When planning for a class, you will need to do the following:

  1. Select a date, time, and location. Keep in mind who you want to attend when deciding these things, but don’t get caught up in trying to make it work for everyone—you can always hold more than one of the same class.
  2. Invite people, and remind them about it a week before and the day before the class.
  3. Order your materials. AromaTools has a lot of ingredients and containers that are commonly used for essential oil DIY projects. AromaTools also offers a free event program and additional resources to help you with your classes. Click here for more information.
  4. Gather essential oils and other needed materials. Print any instructions, handouts, and labels as needed.at_eo_mt_class_supplies
  5. Prepare a short lesson. The length of your lesson can depend on how much time it will take for your make-and-take project. If you try to keep your lesson to less than 30 minutes, you should have enough time for questions and your make-and-take project. Here are a few ideas for lesson topics:
    • the basics of essential oils;
    • how essential oils support a specific body system;
    • the most common essential oils and how to use them;
    • essential oils for [fill in the blank] (children, pregnancy, animals, emotions, cooking, cleaning, weight loss, exercising, basic first aid, women, romance, winter wellness, etc.).

    Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils can be a great resource in helping you plan your lesson.at_me8_lifestyle2

  6. Hold your class. Remember to keep it simple: give your short lesson; answer questions; show how to do the make-and-take project; then let your guests do their project, mingle, eat refreshments, and leave.
  7. Follow up. If you were introducing anyone to essential oils through your class, make sure to contact them later that week and answer any further questions they have or invite them to another class later.

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These are a few things you will need to consider when preparing for your class:

  • Decide if you want to discuss any business opportunities or keep the lesson education-based. If you do want to market a specific essential oil company, be careful not to make any health claims about the essential oils; speaking generally about health benefits is better. You can always give your class attendees an “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet or refer them to other information that provides more specific uses for essential oils.
  • Decide if and how you want to charge for the make-and-take project. Some charge a flat fee for their classes; others give their attendees 1 free item and charge for extras; and some provide (or charge for) materials but not the essential oils.
  • Depending on the make-and-take item, you may want to prepare a sample ahead of time so you can show the finished product.
  • Figure out how to set up your make-and-take station(s). Make sure to have at least one station and arrange it so the attendees can either all make the project at the same time or walk down a line to put together their item. Of course, the way you set this up depends on the number of attendees, the project, the supplies you have on hand, etc.
  • It’s a good idea to have printed instructions of how to make the item so your attendees can refer to it as they make their product and be able to take it home with them so they can make more if desired. You may even want to provide labels so your attendees can remember what they made and what they can do with it after the class.
  • Other optional suggestions include holding a drawing to get contact information, offering refreshments, and providing additional handouts or prizes.

If you would like some specific class ideas, check out our Essential Oil Class Ideas category. Also, feel free to browse our Essential Ideas category for more make-and-take class projects and topics:

Do you have any tips for holding an essential oil make-and-take class? Let us know in the comments below! 

Class Idea: Make & Take Autumn Room Sprays

Seasons are changing, and autumn time is here. The leaves are changing colors and falling on the ground. Along with these changes, we begin to notice different smells such as apples baking, pumpkins and squashes cooking, and sweet spices like cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, cardamom, and ginger. Maybe you aren’t surrounded by those smells, but wish that you were. Well, we’ve got the solution and essential oils to make it easy for you!

You will love how these room sprays bring the autumn scents into your home! You could just make them for yourself, but why not turn it into an easy essential oil make-and-take class and share the love with others?

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The idea for this class is really simple:

  1. Invite all the people you want. Make sure to remind them about the class a week before and the day before, because people really do forget.
  2. Order these items from AromaTools (aromatools.com):
  3. Gather the rest of your materials. These are the other items you will need:
    • Essential oils: cinnamon, ginger, clove, orange, cardamom, rosemary, and patchouli
    • Distilled water
    • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) measuring spoon(s)
    • Scissors (for cutting out the labels)
    • Funnels (helpful, but optional)
  4. Print off these instructions on regular paper and these labels on the blank label sheets from AromaTools.
  5. Prepare a short lesson about essential oils and their benefits. A great topic to discuss is how the essential oils in these sprays have antibacterial properties and can help purify the air and support the immune system. Remember to keep the lesson free of health claims and speak generally of supporting the immune system rather than listing specific conditions if you plan on discussing any business opportunities with an essential oil company. You can find great information for your lesson in Modern Essentials™: A Contemporary Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils. Here are a few pages from the 8th Edition to help you get started: pp. 6–10; 28; 29; 218–19; 288.
  6. Make one of each of the sprays listed below before the class so your attendees can try them and choose a scent they would like to make.
  7. Prepare your make-and-take stations. Set up the materials so it is easy for everyone to make their room spray. It is up to you whether or not you charge your attendees for making make one or more sprays, but we suggest allowing each attendee one free spray and charging for extras if they desire more than one. Make sure to have enough instruction sheets to allow each attendee to take one home in case they would like to make any of the other sprays on their own.
  8. Offer refreshments, if desired.

This is a great class to simply give your attendees a little information about essential oils, time for asking questions, and a fun autumn-scented spray to take home with them. If you want to discuss the business side of essential oils, this class is an easy one to do that as well.

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Fall Room Sprays

  • Servings: Yield=2 Tbsp. (30 ml)
  • Time: 2–5 minutes active
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients & Supplies:

Instructions:

  1. Pour glycerin and essential oil in the spray bottle; swirl to combine.
  2. Fill the rest of the bottle up with distilled water. Screw the lid on, and shake to mix. If possible, let sit overnight before using to allow the ingredients to integrate.
  3. To use, spray around the room as needed. Do not spray directly in the face.

Essential Oil Autumn Blends:

Pumpkin Spice:
3 drops cinnamon
2 drops ginger
2 drops clove
2 drops orange
1 drop cardamom
Spiced Chai:
3 drops cardamon
2 drops cinnamon
2 drops clove
1 drop ginger
Orange Pomander:
4 drops orange
2 drops clove
2 drops rosemary
Fall Leaves:
6 drops orange
1 drop patchouli
1 drop ginger
Autumn Spice:
4 drops orange
3 drops ginger
2 drops cinnamon
Snickerdoodle:
5 drops orange
2 drops cinnamon
1 drop clove

Build Your Business with “Modern Essentials™ Living”

Have you heard about the Modern Essentials™ Living book? This amazing resource contains cooking recipes, craft ideas, cleaning recipes, body care recipes, class ideas, diffuser blends, and a chart listing common uses for many essential oils and blends. It introduces essential oils in a way that is completely marketing compliant, so it is a safe resource to use in any setting! We want to discuss a few ways you can use Modern Essentials™ Living to help build your business.

Use Modern Essentials™ Living in Your Classes

Modern Essentials™ Living is a perfect resource to use in any marketing or educational class. Here are a few ideas for how to use this book in a class setting:

  • Use one of the class ideas suggested in Modern Essentials™ Living on pp. 189–202. As you apply a facial mask, make jewelry, drink hot chocolate, make cleaning sprays, or make wintertime shower disks, you can talk about the essential oils and even discuss how to make money by being a distributor.
  • You don’t have to stick to our class ideas—you can come up with your own! Try teaching an essential oil cooking class by making one of the food recipes in Modern Essentials™ Living. As you cook, discuss the tips and tricks found on pp. 9–17 for using essential oils in your cooking.
  • DIY classes (also known as make-and-take classes) are very popular because they tend to be more interactive and let your attendees leave with something to try that contains essential oils. Try holding a make-and-take class of your own, and use the craft, body care, cleaning, or holiday ideas in Modern Essentials™ Living as your DIY project. Don’t forget to introduce the essential oils and let your attendees know where they can purchase them.
  • Have a few copies of Modern Essentials™ Living on hand to pass around your classes. This is a great way to show “newbies” all the different ways you can use essential oils other than the standard application methods. You may even have some people ask to buy one of your copies!
  • The Modern Essentials™ Living book can be used as a drawing prize. You can have your class attendees enter a drawing as they arrive (you may even want to offer this as an incentive to arrive early). Whenever you choose to close the drawing, select a winner and give him or her a copy of Modern Essentials™ Living!

Using Modern Essentials™ Living at Trade Shows

Running an essential oil booth at a trade show is the perfect example of marketing essential oils. But you need a way to get people interested in the essential oils without making health claims. This is where Modern Essentials™ Living can be beneficial! Here are a few ways you can use this book at a trade show:

  • Have several copies available for people to browse through. This can help them get an idea of how the oils can be used without you needing to explain it to them.
  • Make some of the products for people to try as they come to your booth. This can give them a way to experience essential oils aromatically and topically. If the venue allows it, you may even be able to offer essential oil food samples.
  • You may want to consider offering a class at another time and have interested people sign up for your classes while at the trade show. It is often difficult to relay all the information you would like to while having short conversations with passersby, so a class is a way you can educate interested parties a little more thoroughly. If you want to hold a make-and-take class, be sure to have the finished product available at the trade show to provide an example of what will be made in the class.

Use Modern Essentials™ Living to Build and Educate Your Team

One of the best ways to build an essential oil business is to educate your team members about the many ways essential oils can be used. Here are a few ideas of you can do this with Modern Essentials™ Living:

  • Send out an email every once in a while that contains a tip/trick about essential oils. Modern Essentials™ Living contains many bits of useful information including application methods, cooking tips, recipes, class ideas, diffuser blends, and even information about what each oil can do (found in the Quick Usage Chart). If you share information from the book, just make sure to reference it as your source and let your team members know where they can get a copy for themselves!
  • Keep a copy of the book in a waiting area at your office or home. Make sure it is visible and easy to pick up and browse through.
  • Another way Modern Essentials™ Living can be used is to offer it to clients who sign up under you or for rank advancements of your team members.


As you can see, there are many ways Modern Essentials™ Living can help you succeed in your essential oil business. Check out this article to learn more about this amazing resource and see sample pages: Introducing Modern Essentials™ Living.

Do you have any other ideas of how you can use this book to build your business? Comment below! We would love to hear them!

Class Idea: “Intro to Modern Essentials™” Scavenger Hunt

One of the tough things about giving someone a sample of an essential oil is that often that person doesn’t know what to do with it (other than whatever you tell them to). When you share essential oils with a “newbie,” it is important to also give them something containing more information about essential oils. The “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet is the perfect companion to essential oil samples!

What Is Great about This Booklet?

This little booklet is packed with a lot of great information! The first section introduces essential oils and teaches what they are and how they can be used to help enhance health and wellness. The 8th edition of this booklet now includes recipes for diffuser blends, roll-on blends, massage oil blends, bath salts recipes, and cooking guidelines in this section. The next section lists the 44 most common essential oils and some of the ways each one is used. In the last section, the Personal Guide, readers can discover which essential oils, essential oil blends, and essential oil–inspired supplements are commonly used for hundreds of different health conditions. Not only does this booklet give your “newbie” enough information to start using the essential oils, but there is also a place on the back to include your contact information so they know how to contact you if they wish to purchase more oils.

Introduction to Essential Oils Class Idea

The goal of this class is to help your attendees learn about essential oils and show them how to find answers to their essential oil questions.

Start the class with a short lesson introducing and explaining the essential oils. You can use the Introduction to Essential Oils section found in the “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet. Another great resource and handout is the “Modern Essentials™: An Introduction to Essential Oils” Tear Pad. You can also use the Science and Application section found in Modern Essentials™ (the large book) for even more information. We recommend reading this section, if possible, so you are better able to answer any questions your students may have.

Conduct a scavenger hunt activity. Pass out an “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet to everyone in the class. (We recommend letting them take their booklet home with them as a free gift. Make sure to include your contact information on the back!)

Here’s how to do the scavenger hunt activity:

  • You (the teacher) ask a question from the list (7th edition list) (8th edition list).
  • Everyone (all class attendees) tries to find the answer in their booklet.
  • The first person to find the answer raises their hand and waits to be called on to state the answer and where they found it.
  • Give a little time so everyone can also find the answer by going to that page. During this time, you can pass the winner a small treat (this is optional but fun!).
  • Repeat with a new question.

Doing a scavenger hunt activity can not only help bring some fun to your class and make it memorable, but it also gives your students a reason to look through the “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet. As they look through it and find the answers to the questions, they will learn so much about the essential oils and what essential oils can do for specific conditions. It also helps them learn how they can use the booklet to find answers to their own questions. Doing this activity will increase the likelihood of your attendees trying the essentials oils and even purchasing more.

Open the class up for questions. Be sure to leave time to answer questions your attendees have. Try to keep the questions in this class focused more on the essential oils and their benefits. Refrain from marketing a particular brand of essential oils, but rather refer them to another class (even if you hold your marketing class after a 10-minute break) to learn more about where they can purchase essential oils. Remember: Your goal with this class is to help your attendees learn more about the essential oils and how to find information about which oil(s) to use for their health challenges.

This class idea was suggested to us by Jenny Keller. Do you have a class idea you would like to share with others? If so, fill out this survey or comment below. We would love to hear from you!

This “Introduction to Modern Essentials™” booklet makes a great mini textbook for essential oil classes. Click here to see more ideas for using this booklet in your classes!

5 Perfect Summer Make & Take Class Ideas

Even though it is summertime, you can still hold essential oil classes. In fact, there are a lot of make-and-take class ideas that are perfect for summertime!

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Here are a few ideas:

1. Essential Oils for Car Travel:

Use our “Essential Oils for Car Travel” post as your reference to teach a short lesson. Talk about what essential oils would be useful to keep on hand during a road trip. Then make a car diffuser (like this one or this one) or the Soothing Summer Skin Spray (recipe below).

2. Essential Oils for Outdoor Travel:

Use our “Essential Oils for Outdoor Travel” post as your reference to teach a short lesson. Talk about what essential oils would be useful to take on camping trips. Then make sunscreen or the Soothing Summer Skin Spray (recipe below).

3. Essential Oils and Insects:

Use our “Repelling Bugs & Insects” post and our “Soothing Insect Bites and Stings” post as your reference for teaching a short lesson. Then make these Soothing Bug Bite Sticks or these Mosquito-Repelling Paracord Bracelets.

4. Essential Oils for Summertime Body Care:

Use Modern Essentials, pp. 275 (sunburns), 315 (hair), 339–40 (nails), and 365 (skin) as a reference for teaching a short lesson about taking care of your hair, skin, and nails during the summertime. Then make any of the following skincare recipes or the Soothing Summer Skin Spray (recipe below).

5. Essential Oils in Summer Treats:

Use our “Cooking with Essential Oils” blog post as a reference for teaching a short lesson about cooking with essential oils. During the class, you can even make one or more of these recipes and serve them as refreshments afterward.

Soothing Summer Skin Spray Recipe

This soothing spray is perfect for helping you stay cool while out in the heat this summer. All the ingredients are perfect for refreshing you and your skin! You can also use it as an after-sun spray to help soothe sunburned skin.

For those who prefer using wipes rather than a spray, simply mix up this recipe and pour over folded paper towels or bamboo wipes.

If you are using this as a make-and-take class project, you may want to divide the recipe in half for your guests to make a smaller batch and place it in 4 oz. plastic or glass spray bottles.

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Soothing Summer Skin Spray or Wipes

  • Servings: Yield=8 oz. (240 ml)
  • Time: 5 minutes active
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) aloe vera gel
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) witch hazel
  • 1/2 Tbsp. (7.5 ml) Fractionated Coconut Oil
  • 10 drops lavender essential oil
  • 5 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 2 drops melaleuca essential oil
  • 3 drops frankincense essential oil (optional)
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) distilled water
  • 8 oz. plastic or glass spray bottle

Instructions:

  1. Mix together everything except the distilled water. Stir until well combined.
  2. Pour mixture into the spray bottle, and add distilled water. Shake to combine.
  3. To use, mist on skin as needed.

Extra Idea:

Make this recipe into cooling wipes by mixing all ingredients together as outlined above and pouring the liquid over folded paper towels or bamboo wipes until moist. Wring out if needed. Store in a zip-top bag.