Week of Wellness: Lotions and Potions

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The Week of Wellness classes at the Eleve™ Event Center continue, and this post is from the “Lotions and Potions” class taught by Tamalu Watkins, an experienced massage therapist and essential oil user.

Lotions and Potions

Topical application of essential oils is a great way to apply oils, since the skin absorbs the oils quickly. Using lotion as your base for applying oils not only allows you to create custom blends that will last longer with fewer oil drops, but it also ensures that the oils are properly diluted for those with sensitive skin or children.

Making the Lotion

Making your own lotion is easier than you might think, and, because you made it, you know what you are putting on your skin.

One thing people often worry about when making their own lotion is if it will go bad (i.e. rancid or moldy). According to Tamalu, to prevent your lotions from going bad, just make sure all of your equipment and dishes are clean, your hands are clean, and you are using fresh ingredients.

Basic Body Cream Brochure

Tamalu provides a great lotion base recipe in her brochure Basic Body Cream. She lists the specific oils she uses but also mentions that you basically need 4 oz. of hard oils, 6 oz. of soft oils, and 9 oz. of distilled water. You will need about 45–90 drops of essential oils for the whole batch.

During the class, Tamalu shared with us her method and tips for making lotion. Start by heating water on the stove in a pan. Next, measure the hard oils (oils that are solid at room temperature such as beeswax, cocoa butter, coconut oil, shea butter, and mango butter) into a glass measuring cup. Tamalu suggests measuring by weight with a scale because this allows you to have a consistent end product each time you make a batch and also allows you to make substitutions easily. Melt the hard oils by placing the glass measuring cup in the pan of simmering water, stirring often.

Melt OilsWhile the hard oils are melting, measure out the soft oils (oils that are liquid at room temperature such as jojoba oil, sweet almond oil, grape seed oil, sesame seed oil, avocado oil, sunflower oil, shea oil, fractionated coconut oil, or olive oil) in another glass dish on the scale. NOTE: You do not want to melt these soft oils with the hard oils because it can really change the soft oils. For example, if olive oil is heated with the beeswax, the olive oil takes on a smell that will be difficult to mask.

Once the hard oils are melted, add the soft oils to the hard oils. Mix together until blended, and gently warm just until the oils have mixed together. Remove the oils from the heat.

In another glass measuring cup or medium glass bowl, pour in the right amount of distilled water. Place the glass dish in the simmering water, and warm until lukewarm to room temperature. NOTE: Only use distilled water! The minerals in other water can cause a chemical reaction when emulsified with the oils and ruin your lotion.

Whisk Oils and Water TogetherOnce the water is warm, remove the dish from the stove, and turn off the heat. Place an immersion blender in the water, and start blending. While continuing to blend, slowly pour the oil mixture into the water. As you blend, you will hear a change and feel the lotion thicken.

When you think you are done blending the lotion, leave it alone for a few minutes. If, when you come back, you find the water has separated out, that means you haven’t blended it enough. Blend it up again if needed. If the water doesn’t separate within the first few minutes of leaving it, then it means it emulsified properly and won’t separate later.

Now that the lotion is complete, you can add your essential oils to the entire batch or spoon (with a clean spoon or wooden craft sticks) the lotion out into smaller containers before adding the essential oils.

Words of Wisdom from Tamalu Watkins

“You cannot give without receiving.” As you rub oils and massage them into others, you also receive the benefits of the oils through the contact with your hands. As you massage, add the oils AFTER the deep massage, and use a light touch to stimulate the nerves. This increases the effectiveness of the oil application.

Another way to increase the effectiveness of the oils, Tamalu says, is to put socks on after rubbing the lotion (with oils) on your feet. Water also helps “drive” the oils into the skin; so take a shower or bath after rubbing the lotion and oils on your skin.

If you tend to have dry skin, these lotions will keep your skin soft for a long while. You usually don’t have to reapply as often as other lotions unless you are trying to heal a burn or other skin injury.

We hope you give lotion-making a try because we know you will love being able to give your skin a natural moisturizer and customize your lotion to your own needs with essential oils!

About the Presenter


TamaluWatkinsTamalu Watkins is an educator, massage therapist, author, mother of 9, and grandmother of 3 healthy, happy, and active children. Nutrition, essential oils, and essential oil application have been her focus for most of the past 20 years. You won’t regret time spent learning from her years of applied study.

Week of Wellness: Take the Urgency Out of Emergency

Yesterday, we were pleased to host a class called “Take the Urgency Out of Emergency” taught by author Tamalu Watkins in our new Elevé™ Event Center. This class was part of our Week of Wellness to celebrate the grand opening of our new AromaTools™ retail store in Pleasant Grove, UT. This post covers the highlights of what was taught in that class.

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Emergency Essential Oils Kit

The first step to having a truly useful emergency essential oils kit is learning how to use oils to benefit your family today with their everyday health concerns. This competence is the key to a customized kit and the confidence to use it, says Tamalu Watkins—a mother, grandmother, massage therapist, author, and essentials oils educator.

MotherBandagingGirl

Do members of your family have allergy, respiratory, digestive, or blood pressure issues? Then, oils that address those ailments must not only be part of your emergency kit but also part of your mastered skill set. Your everyday needs will only intensify in a time of emergency. And that’s before anything else that an accident, sudden illness, or epidemic may throw your way. In other words, “practice makes permanent.” Determine to develop a skill set that will help you intuitively respond better when a crisis comes.

After your personalized oils, add other combinations and blends suitable for any emergency: calming (for victims and yourself as responder), cleansing, protective, respiratory, etc. For example, through years of having sons who play contact sports, Tamalu added bergamot to her kit for protection against head trauma.

What to Include in Your Kit

FirstAidBoxTo round things out, here is Tamalu’s basic supply list to equip you as a ready “first responder” in emergencies:

  • Empty Gelatin Capsules for taking essential oils orally or as suppositories.
  • Vegetable Glycerin as a carrier oil for taking oils orally (especially for children who can’t swallow capsules). A couple of drops of lemon (and a drop of oregano for adults) in a spoonful of glycerin can help soothe a sore throat or cough—the glycerin is naturally sweet and will not compromise the immune system or become dangerous over time like commercial cough syrups. To soothe cracked, bleeding skin, add a drop each of lavender and fractionated coconut oil to a glycerin base, and apply topically.
  • Baking soda for aiding detoxification. Make a paste, and spread it over affected areas. Add a drop of Purifying Blend for insect bites or a combination of lavender, peppermint, and eucalyptus for rashes.
  • Epsom Salts for detoxification as well as for reducing swelling and pain. Add to water to soak a sprain, strain, or bruise.
  • Fractionated coconut oil for diluting essential oils when massaging a large area or applying to sensitive skin.
  • Hydrogen peroxide for applying to wounds to loosen embedded materials.
  • Mustard plaster for a disaster in which lungs are affected. Use with caution, especially on small children and pets. Basic recipe: 3 heaping tablespoons dry mustard, 5 heaping tablespoons flour, ½ teaspoon baking soda, and water. Combine dry ingredients, and add enough water for a thick paste. The wetter the plaster, the “hotter” it becomes. Do not apply it directly to the skin. Spread it on a clean rag, or—better yet—spread between two old, clean t-shirts and then wear the double t-shirt. Discard the rag or t-shirts after treatment, and rinse the skin.
  • A variety of bandages and self-adhering sports wrapping tape for dressing all types of wounds. Rinse the wound with clean water, if possible. For embedded debris, soak with hydrogen peroxide to loosen, and then rinse. Drop lavender, melaleuca, or other soothing oils or blends onto the wound to cleanse, reduce pain, and promote healing. Seal with fractionated coconut oil (or other ointment), and cover with a gauze sponge. Wrap with gauze roll, and secure with self-adhering tape.

Knowledge Is Power

Tamalu’s ultimate objective for emergency preparedness is this: “Drop me—or you—into any situation with oils in hand, and we can come out OK because our knowledge will make a difference for good.” To benefit from Tamalu’s 20 years of experience with essential oils, check out her pamphlets, brochures, and books at AromaTools.com.

About the Presenter


TamaluWatkinsTamalu Watkins is an educator, massage therapist, author, mother of 9, and grandmother of 3 healthy, happy, and active children. Nutrition, essential oils, and essential oil application have been her focus for most of the past 20 years. You won’t regret time spent learning from her years of applied study.